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Foods That Stabilizes Blood Sugar

Foods That Stabilize Blood Sugar

Foods That Stabilize Blood Sugar

Controlling your blood sugar and insulin levels is probably one of the most important factors for slowing the aging process and preventing many diseases. Diabetes heart disease, high blood pressure and cholesterol weight gain – especially belly fat various forms of cancer inflammation resulting in arthritis, wrinkles and even hair loss … are all influenced by elevated blood sugar levels. So this is a very important topic for overall health, fitness and longevity. Best Foods for Best Blood Sugar In a minute I’ll reveal some of the best tactics I’ve used over the past 25 years to help prevent and reverse diabetes, but let’s first discuss the best foods for stabilizing your blood sugar levels. Protein You should have some protein with all of your meals, whether it’s vegetarian or animal. If it’s animal, please select low fat sources and it’s best to not fry the meat. Steam, bake or broil. Fats You should also have a little bit of healthy fats with all your meals because fat lowers the release of insulin, improves the glycemic load of a meal and helps stabilize your blood sugar levels. The best fats are natural forms – such as fish oils, flax-seed, raw nuts, avocado, coconut and similar fats. Stay away from heated and hydrogenated fats. Fiber Similar to fat, fiber also helps control the release of insulin – so you should have some fiber with all your meals. The best source would be vegetables, fruit and legumes. Carbohydrates And finally, the main food that really controls your blood sugar and that’s carbohydrates. Ideally you want to select low glycemic carbohydrates. The best are vegetables, fruits, sweet potatoes, and legumes. The worse are grains – such as breads, pasta, rice, and oats. These should be limited and the best time to eat them would Continue reading >>

How Does Eating Healthy Stabilize Blood Glucose Levels?

How Does Eating Healthy Stabilize Blood Glucose Levels?

Diabetics face a daily struggle of keeping blood glucose levels under tight control. But you don’t have to be diabetic to benefit from maintaining a steady supply of glucose in your bloodstream to provide your body with the energy it needs. When blood glucose levels are unstable, you risk experiencing a dangerous condition called hypoglycemia in which you feel lightheaded, confused, slow, shaky or fatigued. By choosing healthier food options, including whole, fresh foods with a low glycemic index, you can stabilize your glucose levels to avoid glucose crashes. Excess Sugar Many Americans consume too much added sugar in their diets, sometimes more than 22 teaspoons or 355 calories a day from various sources. To increase shelf life and enhance flavor, food manufacturers add sugar to many processed foods, from cereals to sauces to frozen dinners. Sodas are also loaded with sugar. These hidden sugars add empty calories to your diet, leading to overweight and obesity, which in turn are risk factors for prediabetes and diabetes. Avoiding processed foods in favor of fresh, whole foods leads to a healthier diet and greater stability for blood glucose levels. The Glycemic Index Glucose is your body’s main source of energy, derived from foods that contain carbohydrates. Researchers at the University of Sydney came up with a carbohydrate-rating system called the glycemic index. This system ranks foods with carbohydrates according to how quickly they are digested and turn into glucose in the bloodstream. Foods that score 55 or below are low glycemic, digesting slowly and providing a steady stream of glucose over time instead of a quick burst of energy. Foods with a score over 70 are considered high glycemic, causing your blood sugar levels to rise quickly and leading to crashes Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acidsthe "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerelcan help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. A study at the University of Texas Southwest Continue reading >>

A Natural Way To Help Control Blood Sugar

A Natural Way To Help Control Blood Sugar

Keeping blood sugar levels balanced is crucial for helping maintain energy levels and avoid complications associated with diabetes. Dietary changes, such eliminating certain foods and focusing on others, and lifestyle changes, such as exercise and stress avoidance, can and do make a difference in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. While dietary fiber doesn't supply nutrients or calories, it positively affects your blood sugar. Soluble fiber, which is soluble in water, helps stabilize blood sugar levels by delaying stomach emptying, thus slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption, improving regulation of blood sugar and lowering your body's insulin requirements. Insoluble fiber, which isn't soluble in water, increases the speed of waste elimination, helping to prevent constipation. The recommended dietary intake is 14 grams for every 1,000 calories you consume. Most fiber-rich foods also contain other types of non-fiber carbs, such as sugar or starch, that you must keep in mind for meal planning. Focus on low-carb, non-starchy fiber sources, such as spinach, kale, broccoli, leafy greens and green beans. Fruits, potatoes, corn, peas, beans, lentils, winter squash and whole-grain breads, cereals and pastas are also rich in fiber, but higher in starchy carbohydrates. Eat Antioxidant-Rich Foods Some clinical studies suggest that people with diabetes have elevated levels of free radicals and lower levels of antioxidants that fight free radicals. Free radicals are molecules containing unpaired electrons that can damage cells and cause disease. Preliminary clinical studies show the antioxidants vitamin E, selenium and zinc may help keep blood glucose levels in a normal range, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Fruits, such as blueberries, cherries and Continue reading >>

5 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar

5 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar

Good health is all about balance, especially when it comes to blood sugar. Eating the proper ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates at every meal keeps blood sugar stable, helps maintain physical and emotion balance, stops food cravings, and sustains energy levels. Balance your blood sugar by eating from the following list regularly, and don’t forget to keep your body hydrated with PLENTY of water each day. You can’t eat enough of these! Look for nutrient-dense options such as kale, spinach, and broccoli, which are loaded with fiber and calcium. Eat them at every meal! Wild caught fish, free-range beef, and eggs are excellent sources of blood stabilizing protein. Eat 4 to 6 ounces at least twice a day for blood sugar balance Grab a handful of almonds or walnuts for a healthy snack that keeps you satisfied and stable. Nuts are a great source of fiber, healthy fat, and protein. Lentils, garbanzo beans, and hummus are high in fiber, low in fat, and a good source of protein, keeping blood sugar nice and steady. Be sure to soak beans overnight, which will ease digestion. To balance blood sugar, avoid foods that spike insulin levels, increase inflammation in the body, and lead to weight gain. For optimal health, steer clear of these next two foods... No longer limited to candy, refined sugar is added to everyday items such as salad dressing, yogurt, fruit juice, and prepackaged foods. Read food labels carefully and focus on fresh, whole foods to avoid unnecessary spikes in blood sugar. Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

How To Help Stabilize Your Blood Sugar Better Throughout The Day

How To Help Stabilize Your Blood Sugar Better Throughout The Day

Anyone who has ever dealt with low blood sugar knows how debilitating it can truly be. Not only can it make you incredibly hungry, but also moody, angry, lightheaded, and your mental focus may suffer as well (even with all the coffee in the world!). Remember that all of our hormones work together as a network, so when one is out of balance, others will be affected too. Hormones are the messengers to our cells that act as regulators in our body, and it’s incredibly important that we care for them as much as possible. Our blood sugar is one of the most important issues to consider when taking care of our hormones, as it can control many other responses within our body, and because the hormone insulin that controls our blood sugar is directly affected through how we eat. Insulin and Our Blood Sugar Insulin’s job is to use glucose from our food to fuel our metabolism to keep our bodies operating normally. Our brains also run primarily on glucose, which aids in mental focus and function. For most of us, we can largely influence how insulin works in our bodies if we take care of our needs to eat healthy foods on a consistent basis throughout the day. However, when we don’t eat, or eat the wrong foods, our insulin levels aren’t able to work like they prefer to. Ideally, we would eat a meal and insulin would draw the glucose from our food, release it into our cells and propel glucose through our bloodstream to give us energy and provide our brains with the nourishment they need. When this process doesn’t work as intended, blood sugar issues start to creep up and pose a problem for our health and well-being. There are some simple things you can do to manage your blood sugar better and support your insulin levels to work for you, instead of against you. Try these out fo Continue reading >>

12 Thyroid-friendly Foods That Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

12 Thyroid-friendly Foods That Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Do you know how important your blood sugar is to your body? When you ignore your blood sugar, you run the risk of serious health consequences. Give your blood sugar the attention it deserves, and find foods that stabilize your blood sugar today. After all, It’s never too late to start eating with your health in mind. Why Blood Sugar Matters Our bodies are constantly dealing with swings in blood sugar, and blood sugar problems are not simply reserved for those dealing with conditions like diabetes. When we keep our blood sugar in check, we keep our body operating properly. The blood in our system drives our bodies, and when our blood sugars are all out of whack we run the risk of those areas (like our brain, for instance) not working properly. In the past, I’ve shared some tips of my own to get the conversation started (1). Today, we’re going to talk even more about eating with your blood sugar in mind. First, let’s pay attention to what a “normal” blood sugar level looks like. This means that we also need to understand the difference between normal and optimal. Normal is where your blood sugar should be, and optimal is where you want your blood sugar to be. In Conclusion: When it comes to your blood sugar, you should always be looking to achieve that optimal status. You should never be settling for less than normal. For your morning fasting glucose level… Normal: <99 mg/dl Optimal: 75 – 85 mg/dl For your post-prandial glucose level (which is 1 – 2 hours after a meal)… Normal: <200 mg/dl Optimal: <120 mg/dl Anxiety Hunger Moodiness Energy crashes There are also less common, but just as serious, symptoms like: Headaches Muscle pain When we start to identify the forces underpinning these symptoms, we might start looking at more serious diseases behind o Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Stabilize Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Stabilize Blood Sugar

Foods That Stabilize Blood Sugar Your blood sugar levels and their fluctuations are intrinsically tied to your health. With recent research, it is becoming more evident than ever that foods that stabilize your blood sugar are important to eat on a regular basis, while foods that cause blood sugar spikes or fluctuations should be avoided. Your blood sugar levels are tied to a wide range of hormonal responses that can contribute to your body's metabolism, your mood, energy levels, fat storage and more. Your body has a very different response when you eat a bagel compared to eating piece of broccoli, and this response is what you need to be concerned about. In general, when you eat foods that break down quickly and cause a spike in your blood sugar, like a bagel, you can become insulin resistant and gain weight more easily. Even worse, you can develop pre-diabetes or diabetes, so be sure to include these seven and other foods that stabilize blood sugar in your diet more frequently. Almonds are one of the best blood sugar stabilizing foods Almonds are high in monounsaturated fats which are associated with stable blood sugar levels. They are also a good source of several vitamins and minerals that can have a wide range of beneficial effects on the body. Magnesium is one mineral in particular that can lower your blood sugar. The fats in almonds are metabolized slowly by your body, as well as the protein and carbs. One cup of almonds has 45 grams of fat, 28 grams of which are healthy monounsaturated fat, 20 grams of protein, and 20 grams of carbohydrates. This is an excellent balance of carbohydrates, protein and fat which makes almonds almost like a small complete healthy meal. A perfect snack to keep your blood sugar stable throughout the day and keep you energized between m Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Balancing your blood sugar levels is essential when you are trying to maintain a healthy weight and reduce your risk of chronic illnesses like diabetes. Foods that stabilize your blood sugar are a great asset for your health, and the foods that cause a spike in your blood sugar such as simple carbs, sugar, grains and refined carbs can lead to insulin resistance which further develops into diabetes. The good news is that you can reverse the damage to your blood sugar levels and metabolism that may have been caused by a poor diet just by eating the right foods. Although a structured low calorie diet like the HCG diet is one of the best ways to do this quickly, you can also try implementing certain foods into your diet that can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and avoid the risk of developing insulin resistance. Blood Sugar Stabilizing Food #1 - Spinach Spinach is one of the best blood sugar balancing foods out there, and overall it is considered to be a superfood because it is loaded with antioxidants. It is one of the best foods that can help you feel satiated while providing you with enough energy and nutrients. Spinach is low in carbohydrates and is a low glycemic index vegetable, and it works as a great replacement for bread and other carbohydrates. Spinach also has a detoxifying effect that may help with blood sugar and metabolic stabilization, and diets rich in leafy green vegetables like spinach are associated with a much lower risk of Type 2 diabetes. It is rich in phytonutrients and minerals and vitamins as well such as magnesium, folate, and many others, and when you eat spinach alone or with other low glycemic index fruits and vegetables or protein it has the best blood sugar stabilization effect. Blood Sugar Stabilizing Food #2 - Nuts Nuts such as Continue reading >>

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

When Thomas Rupp was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was stunned. Despite having a challenging career (he was working in corporate finance and for FEMA), he managed to exercise regularly, and he rarely ate fast food or sweets. Sure, he weighed 245 pounds, but at 6 feet tall that didn't seem so terrible. He didn't consider that his weight pushed his BMI into the obese category—and he didn't realize that many of the "healthy" foods he was eating were actually loaded with tons of sugar and calories. Rupp's doctor started him on four different medications. The side effects were bothersome, but what really kicked him into gear was learning that he'd need to start injecting himself with insulin nightly. Instead, he turned to the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center, where he met with the founding director, Michael Dansinger, MD. They worked together to closely examine Rupp's diet and uncover pitfalls that Rupp had trouble spotting on his own. (You can control your blood sugar with food and without insulin by making healthy lifestyle changes. Try the easy plan in The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes.) For instance, while adding some cream and sugar to a cup of coffee might not be a big deal for some people, Rupp often downed 10 cups of coffee a day to power himself through long days in the office. (Here are 8 physical signs you drink way too much coffee.) And he was putting cream and sugar in each cup. "That's 10 containers of cream and 10 teaspoons of sugar a day I was adding to my diet," he says. And even though he worked out, "I was drinking green juices at the gym, or protein smoothies with mango, once again without realizing the sugar content." Other seemingly healthy choices—like salads—also concealed stealth sugar bombs. "I would add vinaigrette dressi Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

Blood Sugar Balance in Plain English Before we get started with tips to balance your blood sugar, I want to cover some basic blood sugar terms that I will be using in this discussion. Blood sugar/blood glucose – Glucose is the form of sugar that is in our bloodstream. Glucose is the body’s preferred source of fuel. Insulin – the pancreas secretes insulin, a hormone that shuttles glucose from the blood into body cells. It knocks on the cell and says, “Open up, I’ve got some glucose that I need to get out of the bloodstream so take it and use it for energy.” Insulin resistance – When we consume a large amount of refined carbs with very little fat and protein, our blood sugar spikes very high and the pancreas frantically overcompensates with insulin release. This overcompensation of insulin eventually causes insulin resistance, which leads to Type 2 Diabetes if poor dietary practices are continued. The good news, however, is that it can an be reversed through a healthy diet that balances your blood sugar. Glycogen – Glucose that doesn’t enter body cells is taken to the liver where it is converted to glycogen. This is a form of stored sugar that is broken down to stabilize low blood sugar levels between meals and during the night. It is healthful for the body store of glycogen, but stress and hormone dysfunction deplete our ability to store glycogen and this can contribute to blood sugar imbalance. Hyperglycemia – Hyperglycemia is another term for high blood sugar. It is normal to have a spike in blood sugar after a meal, but chronically high blood sugar causes severe health issues. Hypoglycemia – Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. Glycogen, the sugar stored in the liver, is responsible for raising blood sugar in-between meals and should prevent hypoglyc Continue reading >>

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

Part 1 of 15 A healthy diet is essential to reversing prediabetes. There are no foods, herbs, drinks, or supplements that lower blood sugar. Only medication and exercise can. But there are things you can eat and drink that have a low Glycemic Index (GI). This means these foods won’t raise your blood sugar and may help you avoid a blood sugar spike. In addition to diet changes, staying or becoming active is also important. Learn which foods you can add to your diet plan. You may be able to prevent prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by adding more of these foods, spices, and drinks into your diet. Eat them as healthy alternatives to sugar, high GI carbohydrates, or other treats. Want more info like this? Sign up for our diabetes newsletter and get resources delivered right to your inbox » Part 2 of 15 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are important components of a healthy blood sugar eating plan. They can improve insulin sensitivity. They can also help increase feelings of satiety, and have a healthy impact on blood pressure and inflammation. MUFAs are a key nutrient in avocados. Studies have shown avocados can lower the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is a group of risk factors that can increase the risk of diabetes. It can also raise the risk of blood vessel disease like heart disease and stroke. Avocados also have a low GI. For a unique, diabetes-friendly dessert, try making Oh She Glow’s natural, no sugar added, raw avocado chocolate pudding. Part 3 of 15 Protein helps the body maintain and repair itself. Since protein doesn't impact blood sugar levels, it doesn't have a GI ranking and won’t raise blood sugar levels. Protein also increases satiety, so relying on protein to feel full instead of bread, rice, or pasta may be Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

7 Ways To Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Enjoy Mediterranean meals iStock/Thinkstock According to studies involving 140,000 people, the odds of developing diabetes are 21 percent lower for those who follow a Mediterranean diet—building meals around plant-based foods, including fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, whole grains, and olive oil. Fish and chicken are eaten regularly but not red meat, butter, or sweets. Phytonutrients and fiber in the plant foods help with blood sugar control, and the olive oil might reduce inflammation. Go blue iStock/Thinkstock Eating more anthocyanins—the nutrients that give grapes and berries their bright red and blue colors—was linked to better blood sugar control in a new British study. One portion a day of grapes or berries can have the same impact on blood sugar as a one-point reduction in your body mass index, says researcher Aedin Cassidy of Norwich Medical School. Don't skip breakfast If you frequently miss a morning meal, you'll be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Eating breakfast may help stabilize blood sugar throughout the day. Prepare a healthy blend of protein, complex carbs, and fat—yogurt mixed with fruit and nuts, for example. Starting the day with lots of simple carbs (such as a bagel and OJ) is just as bad for your blood sugar as skipping the meal, according to experiments at the University of Minnesota. Sweat and strengthen iStock/Thinkstock Women who did both cardio (at least two and a half hours) and strength training (at least one hour) every week had the lowest diabetes risk—about one third less than that of non-exercisers. After an exercise session, your muscles take up more glucose from the bloodstream. As you become more fit over time, cells become more sensitive to insulin. Step away from the desk (and the TV) Hemera, iStock, Photodisc/ Continue reading >>

12 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar, A Holistic Nutritionist Explains

12 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar, A Holistic Nutritionist Explains

Do you regularly experience food cravings, mood swings, irritability or fatigue? If so, you may have a blood sugar imbalance. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1/3 of Americans are at imminent risk of becoming diabetic, and 90% of those at risk don’t even know it! Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial for optimal health and minimizes your risk of chronic conditions such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s and heart disease. Understanding Blood Sugar When you eat sugars and simple carbohydrates, these foods release glucose into the bloodstream very quickly, spiking your blood sugar. This spike forces the pancreas to produce excess insulin, which escorts the sugars out of the bloodstream and into the cells. Over time, when insulin levels are driven up over and over several times a day (due to too much sugar in the blood), the pancreas gets worn out and cells become resistant to accepting any more sugar. This excess sugar in the blood keeps blood sugar levels unnaturally high and insulin ends up storing it as fat. This can lead to visceral (abdominal) fat, weight gain and unhealthy cholesterol. As you can see, it’s not a good situation! And if left unchecked, a situation that can put you in the danger zone for diabetes and associated degenerative health concerns. But the good news is that it can be reversed through a healthy diet and lifestyle that balances your blood sugar. Below are some strategies to help you do just that! 12 Ways to Balance Blood Sugar 1. Learn about the glycemic index Foods low on the glycemic index release energy slowly into the bloodstream and cause only minor changes in blood sugar levels. These include animal protein, nuts and seeds, oils and fats, beans and lentils, whole g Continue reading >>

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