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Foods That Raise Blood Sugar Slowly

List Of Foods That Will Quickly Raise Blood Sugars

List Of Foods That Will Quickly Raise Blood Sugars

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar levels, can make you feel weak or tired. You can often prevent or treat the condition and restore your blood sugar to normal levels by eating high-glycemic foods, which are carbohydrate-containing foods that quickly raise your blood sugar levels. Contact your doctor if you suspect that you have a serious underlying condition. Video of the Day Watermelon, pineapple, bananas and grapes are fruits with a high glycemic index that can quickly raise your blood sugar. The glycemic index, or GI, of processed foods tends to be higher than fresh foods. Dried fruits, such as raisins and dried dates, can quickly raise your blood sugar levels. Fruit juice raises your blood sugar more rapidly than fresh fruit. To help replenish your body’s energy stores, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach suggests that you consume 8 ounces of fruit juice within 30 minutes of finishing a workout. Get a Boost from Refined Grains White bread, cooked white pasta and rice, pancakes, soda crackers and breakfast cereals made with refined grains can quickly raise your blood sugar levels. Refined grain products typically raise your blood sugar levels faster than their whole grain counterparts because they are lower in dietary fiber, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Rice cakes, hard pretzels, cornflakes and bagels are convenient choices to carry with you in case you begin experiencing symptoms of low blood sugar. Cooked carrots, potatoes and sweet potatoes can boost your blood sugar. Raw carrots have a lower GI. Nonstarchy vegetables, such as leafy greens, eggplant, zucchini and cucumbers, are lower in carbs and have very little effect on your blood sugar levels. Fat slows digestion and makes your blood sugar levels rise less quickly, so potatoes cooked wit Continue reading >>

The Fastest & Slowest Carbohydrates For Low Blood Sugars

The Fastest & Slowest Carbohydrates For Low Blood Sugars

Treating a low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) might seem easy: eat something with carbohydrates. But to ensure that you’re getting the best source of carbohydrate that will raise your blood sugar as quickly as possible isn’t as simple as you might’ve thought. For the most part, my relationship with diabetes is a positive one. Checking my blood sugar and taking shots doesn’t evoke any significant negative emotion in my mind (although, don’t get me wrong, I’d love a cure). However, treating a low blood sugar with something I’ve used a hundred-zillion times before, like glucose tabs, tends to make me feel sick to my stomach. Literally, the idea of consuming another juice box to treat another low makes me feel sick to my stomach and it evokes a sense of disgust. “I don’t want to drink another freaking juice box or eat one more freaking glucose tab!” Today, I no longer buy juice boxes for treating lows. And I have dozens and dozens of glucose tabs…but I am sick of that taste. Sick of the connection of how I feel when I’m low with whatever food I’m using to treat it. It’s an emotional connection I’ve made to my diabetes management that is negative. So I find new carbohydrates to treat my low blood sugars on a regular basis. Unfortunately, like I said, different types of carbohydrate take different amounts of time to break down into glucose and get into your bloodstream. I spoke with my friend, Mara Schwartz, who lives with Type 1 diabetes, and is a colleague of mine at TeamWILD (We Inspire Life with Diabetes) as the Director of Special Projects. She is a registered nurse, a diabetes educator and a clinical researcher at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes in Aurora, CO. She shared with me the fastest and slowest sources of carbohydrate fo Continue reading >>

A Long Glycemic Index Food List To Keep Your Blood Sugar Levels Balanced

A Long Glycemic Index Food List To Keep Your Blood Sugar Levels Balanced

The glycemic index food list is there for your benefit, and you’ll find that it will help you to learn more about which foods will be good for your blood sugar levels – as well as which ones can have a negative effect. There are many low glycemic foods that you can eat, and these foods will work wonders for your body by keeping your glucose levels low. High glycemic foods are the ones that will raise your blood sugar levels, and it’s these high glycemic index foods that you want to avoid. By following the glycemic index, weight loss is also a very real possibility. Understanding the Glycemic Index Before we can look at the free glycemic index chart below, it’s important that you understand just what the glycemic index really is. The Glycemic Index (or GI) is a chart that lists the foods according to their effect on your blood sugar. Foods that have a greater effect on your blood glucose levels will be ranked with a higher GI, while those with a lower GI ranking will not affect your blood sugar as much. There are many diets that you can try to help you to keep your carb consumption low, and the Glycemic Index Diet and Atkins Diet are two of them. You’ll find that these diets can help you to keep your blood sugar under control, as they’ll ensure that you don’t get too much glucose in your system. How Fast Carbs and Slow Carbs Affect Your Body High Glycemic Foods Pushes Your Insulin Production Through the Roof When you eat high glycemic foods – foods that will affect your blood sugar levels in a noticeable way – you’ll find that your body has to produce a lot more insulin to keep up with the glucose that comes from all the food you eat. This is because too much glucose can cause problems in your body, so your body has to respond by creating insulin to p Continue reading >>

List Of Slow-release Carbohydrate Foods

List Of Slow-release Carbohydrate Foods

Written by Aglaee Jacob; Updated June 30, 2017 The carbohydrates in asparagus are released very slowly. Food Combinations to Steady Blood Sugar & Raise Metabolism Most breads, white rice, breakfast cereals, white potatoes, soft drinks and baked goods contain carbohydrates that are quickly broken down into sugars. Quick-release carbs cause a sharp and rapid rise in your blood sugar levels, increasing your risk of putting on weight and getting type 2 diabetes. Slow-release carbs on the other hand are healthier options to keep your blood sugar levels more stable between meals and help you feel more satiated so that you can reach and maintain a healthy weight and prevent chronic diseases. All non-starchy vegetables contain slow-release carbohydrates. Good examples of non-starchy vegetables include spinach, kale, tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, onions and asparagus. Eat some at each of your meals to get the healthy kind of carbohydrates that will provide you with a slow but steady supply of energy for hours following your meal. Getting more non-starchy veggies is as simple as adding spinach, mushrooms and tomatoes to your morning omelet, preparing a big salad of leafy greens for lunch, snacking on carrot and celery sticks and accompanying your dinner with stir-fried broccoli, red bell pepper and onions. Some starchy vegetables, especially white potatoes, contain quick-release carbohydrates. Most fruits have a low to moderate glycemic index, the best tool to determine whether a food contains slow- or quick-release carbohydrates. If you want to eat only the most slowly released carbohydrates to minimize variations in your blood sugar levels, avoid tropical fruits, such as papaya, mango and pineapple. Instead, go for berries, melons, cherries, apples, plums and pear Continue reading >>

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

Wondering what blood sugar has to do with you, if you don’t have diabetes? Keeping your blood sugar levels as steady as possiblenow may help you avoid getting diabetes later. “As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes goes up,” says Alissa Rumsey, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Since you can’t modify your age, it is important to take other steps to lower your risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough exercise, and balancing your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar.” Controlling your blood sugar will also just make you feel better. “It’s best to control blood sugar—it keeps your energy stable,” says Leann Olansky, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If your blood sugar doesn’t vary that much before and after a meal, that’s a healthier way to be.” Unrelated to diabetes, symptoms of occasional high blood sugar aren’t life-threatening, but rather unpleasant and only potentially dangerous if you suffer from other health problems. “When your blood sugar is too high, it can make you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Olansky. “When it’s higher still, it can lead to dehydration and make your blood pressure unstable, and cause you to urinate more often, especially at night.” But when your blood sugar remains chronically high, insulin, a hormone that’s supposed to help your body store sugar as energy, stops working as it should. “Prolonged high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, meaning your body isn’t able to use insulin properly,” says Rumsey. “Over time this insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, when insulin isn’t able to keep your blood sugar within normal levels.” Current research reveals an association between spik Continue reading >>

Foods’ Strange Tricks

Foods’ Strange Tricks

You sit down to eat. How will your meal affect your blood glucose? If you’re on insulin, how much should you take? Turns out that counting carbohydrate will not always give you the answer. Food can affect you in strange ways. Do you know about the pizza effect? In a blog on glycemic index, I mentioned how plain pizza had a much higher glycemic index than a deluxe pizza with all the toppings. Plain dough and sauce raises your blood glucose way faster. What I didn’t mention was that all that carbohydrate in the deluxe pizza will get into your bloodstream eventually. You just don’t know when, unless you check your blood glucose every hour for four hours or even more. That’s because the fats and protein in the toppings slow down the absorption of carbohydrate. As a result, your blood glucose might spike two to five hours after the meal. Other meals that combine lots of carbohydrate with fats and/or proteins could have the same effect. Jan Chait posted here five years ago about a big spaghetti fest she had with her husband. The pasta was covered with a fatty sauce, with a side of garlic bread and lots of butter. Because of the fats (the pizza effect,) her blood glucose levels were up for two days, instead of just spiking high for an hour or two. One commenter posted on HealingWell.com that he injected enough insulin to cover the carbohydrate in a big Chinese meal, including lots of fried food. Two hours after eating, his glucose was 171, the same as it had been before the meal. But three hours later his sugar was over 500! It took him days to get back in control. Sometimes the pizza effect is helpful, like at bedtime. A bedtime snack that includes a small amount of fat and protein can help keep overnight levels from going too low. That way you don’t get a rebound e Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

When you have type 2 diabetes, what you eat can help you control your blood sugar, stave off hunger, and feel full longer. “Diabetes is when your blood sugar or glucose levels are higher than normal. It’s carbohydrate foods like breads, cereals, rice, pasta, fruits, milk, and desserts that can cause this rise," says Maggie Powers, PhD, president-elect of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. Your eating plan should focus on the amount and type of carbs you put on your plate throughout the day, Powers says. But it’s also important to have foods you enjoy. You want to eat enough so you feel satisfied and avoid overeating and poor choices. Here are seven foods that Powers says can help keep your blood sugar in check and make you happy and healthy to boot. These add color, flavor, and texture to a meal. Choose tasty, low-carb veggies, like mushrooms, onions, eggplant, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, and low-carb squashes, like zucchini. Try them with dips such as low-fat dressings, hummus, guacamole, and salsa, or roasted with different seasonings such as rosemary, cayenne pepper, or garlic. Go beyond your regular salad and try kale, spinach, and chard. They’re healthy, delicious, and low-carb, Powers says. Roast kale leaves in the oven with olive oil for quick, crunchy chips. You can also mix greens in with roasted veggies to add texture and a different flavor, or serve them with a little protein, like salmon. Plain water is always good, but water infused with fruits and vegetables is more interesting. Cut up a lemon or cucumber and put it in your water, or make ice cubes with some flavoring in them. If you’re not a hot tea drinker, try cold tea with lemon or a cinnamon stick. “Not only are these beverages low-carb, they can also help fill y Continue reading >>

6 So-called “healthy” Foods That Can Mess With Your Blood Sugar

6 So-called “healthy” Foods That Can Mess With Your Blood Sugar

by Dr. Will Cole Blood sugar imbalance is one of the most common signs of hormonal issues and when your thyroid, leptin, insulin, and cortisol hormones are off, so are you. When hormones mess with blood sugar, you might feel irritable, exhausted, and hangry, and this can make it very difficult to resist the foods you know you shouldn’t be eating. Most of my patients are well-educated in all things healthy, but despite their best efforts, they often still have hormone and blood sugar problems, exacerbated by foods they were sure were healthy, but can actually aggravate blood sugar imbalance in some people. Here are the foods you may not realize are aggravating your blood sugar balance: 1. Agave nectar Agave is a syrupy sweetener that is often considered a health food because it is categorized as low-glycemic (a measure of how specific carbohydrate-containing foods raise blood sugar). The problem is that agave nectar is high in fructose, which is hard on the liver and could contribute to fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. Also, although it may raise your blood sugar more slowly, it may also raise it just as high over a longer period, which isn’t necessarily better. 2. “Good” grains We’ve all heard the downsides of wheat and how gluten can be bad for your health in a myriad of ways. However, gluten-free grains as well as whole or sprouted grains have similar proteins to gluten, which can contribute to inflammation and are still extremely high in amylose sugars. An overload of these can lead to blood sugar spikes, insulin resistance, and inflammation – all risk factors (or markers) for diabetes. 3. Higher fructose fruit Fruit is a natural whole food that contains only natural sugars, so you may think it’s okay because you aren’t dousing it with anyt Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

The Glycemic Index

The Glycemic Index

The glycemic index ranks foods on how they affect our blood sugar levels. This index measures how much your blood sugar increases after you eat. When you make use of the glycemic index to prepare healthy meals, it helps to keep your blood sugar levels under control. This is especially important for people with diabetes, although athletes and people who are overweight also stand to benefit from knowing about this relatively new concept in good nutrition. Recent studies of large numbers of people with diabetes show that those who keep their blood sugar under tight control best avoid the complications that this disease can lead to. The experts agree that what works best for people with diabetes—and probably everyone—is regular exercise, little saturated and trans fat, and a high-fiber diet. That is excellent advice—as far as it goes. The real problem is carbohydrates, and that's what the glycemic index is all about. Foods high in fat or protein don’t cause your blood sugar level to rise much. The official consensus remains that a high-carbohydrate diet is best for people with diabetes. However, some experts recommend a low-carbohydrate diet, because carbohydrates break down quickly during digestion and can raise blood sugar to dangerous levels. A low-glycemic diet avoids both extremes. Many carbohydrate-rich foods have high glycemic indexes, and certainly are not good in any substantial quantity for people with diabetes. Other carbohydrates break down more slowly, releasing glucose gradually into our blood streams and are said to have lower glycemic indexes. The really shocking results of G.I. studies are in which foods produce the highest glycemic response. They include many of the starchy foods we eat a lot of, including most bread, most breakfast cereals, and ba Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

Blood Sugar Balance in Plain English Before we get started with tips to balance your blood sugar, I want to cover some basic blood sugar terms that I will be using in this discussion. Blood sugar/blood glucose – Glucose is the form of sugar that is in our bloodstream. Glucose is the body’s preferred source of fuel. Insulin – the pancreas secretes insulin, a hormone that shuttles glucose from the blood into body cells. It knocks on the cell and says, “Open up, I’ve got some glucose that I need to get out of the bloodstream so take it and use it for energy.” Insulin resistance – When we consume a large amount of refined carbs with very little fat and protein, our blood sugar spikes very high and the pancreas frantically overcompensates with insulin release. This overcompensation of insulin eventually causes insulin resistance, which leads to Type 2 Diabetes if poor dietary practices are continued. The good news, however, is that it can an be reversed through a healthy diet that balances your blood sugar. Glycogen – Glucose that doesn’t enter body cells is taken to the liver where it is converted to glycogen. This is a form of stored sugar that is broken down to stabilize low blood sugar levels between meals and during the night. It is healthful for the body store of glycogen, but stress and hormone dysfunction deplete our ability to store glycogen and this can contribute to blood sugar imbalance. Hyperglycemia – Hyperglycemia is another term for high blood sugar. It is normal to have a spike in blood sugar after a meal, but chronically high blood sugar causes severe health issues. Hypoglycemia – Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. Glycogen, the sugar stored in the liver, is responsible for raising blood sugar in-between meals and should prevent hypoglyc Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Unless you are eating a meal right away, the best treatment for lows is a combination of simple and complex carbohydrates plus some protein. Quickly treating lows lessens stress hormone release and lowers the chance of the blood sugar going high after a reaction. You'll feel better if the body is quickly resupplied with the fuel it needs.Your brain, muscles and other cells will thank you for not prolonging their misery. Eat 15 to 20 grams of fast acting carbohydrates immediately. Consider how much unused bolus insulin may still be active. Decide whether complex carbohydrates and/or protein are needed to keep you stable until you eat your next meal. Test your blood sugar 30 minutes later to make sure it has risen. Repeat step 1 if necessary. After a moderate or severe low blood sugar, wait 30 to 45 minutes before driving or operating machinery. A return to normal coordination and thinking is slower than the return to a normal blood sugar. You may need to eat more than 20 grams for a low: when you took a carb bolus for a meal but never ate it. when it has been only an hour or two since your last injection of rapid insulin. when you have been more physically active. Glucose is the "sugar" in blood sugar and may also be referred to as dextrose on labels. It comes in tablets, such as Dex4 or BD Glucose tablets, and in certain candies like Sweet Tarts. Glucose breaks down quickly and reaches the blood as 100 percent glucose, which makes it the best choice for raising the blood sugar quickly. Another good product for raising your glucose is Glucolift Glucose Tablets . Table sugar consists of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, so when it breaks down in the stomach, only half is immediately available as glucose. Fruit juices, like orange juice, contain mostly fruct Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Eating Low-glycemic Foods

Diabetes: Eating Low-glycemic Foods

Eating low-glycemic foods is one tool to help keep your diabetes under control. The glycemic index is a rating system for foods that contain carbohydrate. It helps you know how quickly a food with carbohydrate raises blood sugar, so you can focus on eating foods that raise blood sugar slowly. Foods that raise blood sugar slowly have a low glycemic index. Most of the carbohydrate-rich foods that you eat with this plan should be low or medium on the glycemic index. Eating low-glycemic foods is most helpful when used along with another eating plan for diabetes, such as carbohydrate counting or the plate format. Counting carbs helps you know how much carbohydrate you're eating. The amount of carbohydrate you eat is more important than the glycemic index of foods in helping you control your blood sugar. The plate format helps you control portions and choose from a variety of foods. The glycemic index of a food can change depending on the variety of the food (for example, red potato or white potato), its ripeness, how it is prepared (for example, juiced, mashed, or ground), how it is cooked, and how long it is stored. People respond differently to the glycemic content of foods. And because many things affect the glycemic index, the only way to know for sure how a food affects your blood sugar is to check your blood sugar before and after you eat that food. High-glycemic foods are rarely eaten by themselves, so the glycemic index might not be helpful unless you're eating a food by itself. Eating foods together changes their glycemic index. Look at the overall nutrition in foods-and not just their glycemic index-when you plan meals. Some low-glycemic foods, such as ice cream, are high in saturated fat and should be eaten only now and then. And some high-glycemic foods, such as Continue reading >>

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