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Foods That Cause Diabetes

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

You're cutting back on coffee iStock/Wavebreakmedia Your java habit might not be such a bad thing. Studies show that coffee consumption (both caffeinated and decaffeinated) can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. One study analysis by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that those who sipped six cups a day had a 33 percent lower risk of developing the disease compared to non-coffee drinkers. Certain components in coffee seem to reduce insulin resistance and may also boost glucose metabolism, the process of converting glucose to energy. Follow these healthy habits to prevent diabetes. You're a chronic night owl iStock/Marilyn Nieves If late night is your favorite time of day, you might be putting yourself at risk for diabetes. A recent Korean study found that people who stay up until the wee hours of the morning are more likely to develop diabetes than those who hit the sack earlier, even if they still get seven to eight hours of sleep, MensHealth.com reported. Night owls tend to be exposed to higher levels of artificial light from televisions and cell phones, a habit that is linked to lower insulin sensitivity and poorer blood sugar regulation, study author Nan Hee Kim, MD, said in a press release. Staying up late is also linked with poor sleep quality and sleep loss, which can disrupt your metabolism. Ignore these diabetes myths that could be sabotaging your health. Your diet is light on probiotics iStock/SilviaJansen "The risk of diabetes increases when you have more bad bugs [bacteria] than good bugs in your gut," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Your stomach needs good bacteria, called probiotics, for proper digestion; low levels can lead to inflammation that may eventually lead to insulin resistance. Eat f Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Just when you think you're making all the right food choices, your blood sugar takes a leap or dive. Foods and drinks can have an impact you might not expect, and these surprise blood-sugar changes can be harmful (potentially causing low or high levels). Here are some things you should consider: Don't let bagels betray you. Counting carbs is a way of life when you have diabetes. Bread can really rack up those carbs, but not all bread is created equal. Think there's no difference between a bagel and an English muffin? One plain English muffin has 140 calories and 27 grams of carbohydrates. A bagel that's 4½ inches in diameter serves up 294 calories and 58 grams of carbs. That's about as many calories and even more carbs than a glazed donut. "It's about portion size. Some bagels are the size of a plate," says Pamela Allweiss, MD, MPH. She's a medical officer in the division of diabetes translation at the CDC. A fruit in any other form may be twice as sweet. All fruits have sugar, but did you know that different forms of the same fruit have vastly different amounts? Dried fruit packs a sugary punch compared with its fresh counterpart. Ten grapes, which weigh about 1.75 ounces, have 34 calories and 8 grams of sugar. They're also full of water, which helps fill you up. A 1.5-ounce, single-serving box of raisins packs 129 calories and 15 grams of sugar, but none of the water. "Without the water, the sugar is more concentrated in dried fruit. And with the smaller size, you're likely to eat many more of them," Allweiss says. Fruit juices are similarly deceptive. A 5-ounce Florida orange has 65 calories, 13 grams of sugar, and 3 grams of fiber. An 8-ounce glass of juice, though, has 112 calories, 24 grams of sugar, and no fiber. Sports drinks may not be so sporty. They may have Continue reading >>

10 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk

10 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk

1 / 11 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk As you pick up your morning coffee en route to work, you contemplate a glossy iced donut in the display case. You know it’s not good for you, but you deserve a treat, right? But before you make a grab for those tempting baked goods, consider this: These seemingly harmless everyday diet decisions aren’t linked just to the obesity epidemic in the United States, but also to the worldwide rise in type 2 diabetes. It’s time to ditch some bad everyday habits — before a diabetes diagnosis forces you to. This isn’t just idle advice, either. A British study of nearly 4,000 people found that such lifestyle fixes were key to stabilizing blood sugar and reversing metabolic syndrome, a condition that leads to diabetes. So what are you waiting for? Here are some important changes you can make to trim your waistline and cut your diabetes risk. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Professor of Cardiology, Summa cum Laude grad, Kahn Center for Longevity and GreenSpace Cafe. www.drjoelkahn.com @drjkahn. Author The Plant Based Solution NEW Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did the Film What the Health Get itRight? The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that sugar does not cause diabetes. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Continue reading >>

Food Causing Diabetes

Food Causing Diabetes

In Short ; Diabetes is caused when the intake of energy (from protein or sugars) is different from the need for that energy. Naturally, this does not happen, but milk, wheat products and foods that have been heated in any way, always contain physical addictive substances, stimulating food consumption regardless the physical need for energy. That is why obesity often comes with diabetes. But diabetes also occurs in thin people; Your body has two types of energy at its disposal: fat-like substances and sugar-like substances. Consuming too little fat de-stabilizes blood-sugar levels, which is what eventually can cause diabetes. So, sugars don't cause fat, and consuming protein or sugars can only cause diabetes in the relative absence of fat, because you need that fat (fatty acids) to be able to deposit redundant blood-sugar glucose) into the fat-depots (as glycerol). Psychological stress can also cause diabetes ; stress increases adrenaline secretion, increasing blood-glucose level. If this glucose is not used for physical activity, this may eventually cause diabetes too. To prevent diabetes: eliminate psychological stress. Consume as little prepared food (proteinacous prepared food in particular) and make sure to consume sufficient fat with every meal. In Detail ; Too little fat Sugars do not cause diabetes. All sugars*, including common sugar, fruit-sugars and starch, are decomposed into glucose for utilization. And glucose is there to feed your brain and your muscles. The brain alone needs 125 to 150 gram of pure glucose a day. Without glucose, which means without sugars, you can't live for a second. Merely the utilization of sugars can never cause diseases. But consuming too much sugar does. Doesn't it ? Only consuming too much protein and / or sugars combined with con Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found. Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role. In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found. Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes: 1. Apples You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes. Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes. “It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that nat Continue reading >>

Can A Poor Diet Cause Diabetes?

Can A Poor Diet Cause Diabetes?

There are two different types of diabetes: type-1 and type-2. While the exact cause of type-1 diabetes is unknown, research has shown that poor diet and a lack of exercise are key factors in the development of type-2 diabetes. To avoid type-2 diabetes, consume a diet low in fast foods, trans fats, saturated fats, sugars and processed foods. Video of the Day Type-2 Diabetes About 95 percent of those affected with diabetes have type-2 diabetes, a slow-developing disease that can occur at any age. People with either type-1 or type-2 diabetes have excess glucose, or blood sugar, in their blood that is not removed by the hormone known as insulin. In type-2 diabetics, an insulin resistance develops, and fat, liver and muscle cells no longer respond correctly to insulin. Symptoms of type-2 diabetes can include fatigue, hunger, increased thirst, blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, increased urination and slower healing. MedlinePlus notes that most people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes are overweight because excess fat makes it more difficult for the body to correctly utilize insulin. Several studies have shown that fast-food consumption can further the development of type-2 diabetes. A 2013 study published in the "European Journal of Nutrition" set out to clarify the role of dietary patterns in the onset of type-2 diabetes in overweight people. The study found that diets high in soft drinks and french fries, and low in fruit and vegetables, were associated with a greater risk of type-2 diabetes in overweight participants, particularly among those who are less physically active. A 2005 study published in "Lancet" concluded that fast-food consumption has a strong positive correlation with weight gain and insulin resistance, implying that fast-food intake may promote obesity and Continue reading >>

Four Food Choices That Greatly Increase Your Diabetes Risk

Four Food Choices That Greatly Increase Your Diabetes Risk

The food choices we make every day greatly influence our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The power of food was revealed in a study of more than 20,000 people from the Netherlands, published earlier this year in the European Journal of Nutrition. It showed that a diet heavy in junk food—characterized by soft drinks, fries, and chips—increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 70 percent. “Diet is of primary importance,” says Dr. Isaac Eliaz, medical director of Amitabha Medical Clinic in California, who was not involved with the study. “If someone wants to reduce their risk of getting type 2 diabetes, dietary changes have to be a part of the strategy, together with exercise and stress management.” To start eating better today, watch out for these four types of food that are known to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Learn Everything You Need to Know About Type 2 Diabetes » Highly Processed Carbohydrates Heavily processed carbohydrates, such as those made with white flour, white sugar, and white rice, are essentially whole foods stripped of important bran and fiber, as well as healthy vitamins and minerals. “Calories devoid of nutrients, with high sugar content, are the primary offenders,” says Eliaz. “As much as possible, these foods should be eliminated.” Because they are so easy to digest, these foods can cause spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels. Over time, this can lead to type 2 diabetes. According to a 2007 study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, a diet high in heavily processed carbohydrates increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 percent in Chinese women, compared with those who ate a diet rich in whole foods. To reduce your risk, limit your intake of foods made with processed carbohydrates, such as breads, muffins, cakes, c Continue reading >>

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Today, more than 30 million Americans have diabetes. Its the underlying cause of over 79,000 deaths per yearand contributes to hundreds of thousands more, according to the American Diabetes Association . Type 2 diabetes is caused by insulin resistance, which occurs when the body cannot properly use insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. There are a number of things that can cause insulin-producing cells to become exhausted and fail. Top offenders include: inactivity, obesity, smoking, consuming too much alcohol, and regularly eating high-glycemic foods that spike blood sugar, say Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health experts. But there are other, less talked about behaviors that can increase your risk of the condition. Take these five dietary habits, for example. They may seem harmless, but nixing them could lower your likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. Its great that you fit vegetables into your dietthey provide a healthy blend of nutrients, and a new study found that antioxidants found in produce could help reduce type 2 diabetes risk. However, its best not to pair starchy vegetables with other carbohydrate-rich foods. (Think: rice with sweet potatoes). While too much starch doesnt directly raise your risk of diabetes, it can contribute to weight gain and blood sugar spikes, both of which could up your risk. As with any food, moderation is key. MORE: 7 Sneaky Signs You May Develop DiabetesAnd How To Stay Healthy Many people dont consider vegetables like sweet potatoes, corn, and peas to be sources of starch, says Jenifer Bowman, RD, a dietitian at UCHealth in Fort Collins, Colorado. But if youre trying to regulate your blood sugar, you need to be aware of overall carbohydrate content. To make sure every meal is a balanced one, fill half yo Continue reading >>

6 Worst Foods For Diabetes

6 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Health Concerns: Diabetes , Type 2 Diabetes Over 25 million people in the United States have diabetes, and diabetes takes an enormous toll on the health of our population.1 Diabetes accelerates aging; damaging the kidneys, cardiovascular system, eyes and nerve tissue, and increases cancer risk.2-4 The devastating complications and premature deaths associated with diabetes can be prevented. The primary cause of the parallel increases in obesity and diabetes is the nutrient-depleted American diet. The worst foods for diabetes the foods that elevate blood sugar, reduce insulin sensitivity and increase type 2 diabetes risk are the foods that are most common in the standard American diet. Since diabetes is characterized by abnormally elevated blood glucose levels, of course it is wise to avoid the foods that cause dangerously high spikes in blood glucose primarily refined foods such as sugar-sweetened beverages, devoid of fiber to slow the absorption of glucose into the blood. Fruit juices and sugary processed foods and desserts have similar effects. These foods promote hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, and promote the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the body: AGEs alter the normal, healthy function of cellular proteins, stiffen the blood vessels, accelerate aging, and promote diabetes complications.5, 6 Refined Grains (White Rice and White Flour Products) Refined carbohydrates like white rice, white pasta, and white bread are missing the fiber from the original grain, so they raise blood glucose higher and faster than their intact, unprocessed counterparts. In a six-year study of 65,000 women, those with diets high in refined carbohydrates from white bread, white rice, and pasta were 2.5 times as likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes compar Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Can Cause Problem In Diabetes Management

7 Foods That Can Cause Problem In Diabetes Management

7 foods that can cause problem in diabetes management 7 foods that can cause problem in diabetes management Diet is an important component to maintain a good blood sugar level. Diet is an important component to maintain a good blood sugar level. If you have diabetes, it essential to stay away from foods that can cause a spike in the blood sugar or increase the risk of diabetic complications. Below we list the foods Diabetics should undoubtedly stay away from. Refined foods such as white bread, refined wheat flour, white rice etc. lead to sudden increase in blood sugar levels as they contain refined starch. Alternatively, you can go for Brown rice, Whole grains and brown bread. Dairy products like whole milk are replete with saturated fats that make things worse for diabetics and hence, should be avoided. These saturated fats also increase bad cholesterol levels and put your heart at risk. Also, add butter, full-fat curd, ghee and cheese on your list of "to-avoid" foods. Instead, go for skimmed milk, toned and double-toned milk, butter milk. Deep-fried foods such as Chips, French fries, Pakodas, Papads and the like also add to bad cholesterol levels. These starch and trans-fat rich oily foods are also the culprits behind weight gain. Obesity is said to be the primary cause of Diabetes. Instead, go for baked foods. The sugar content in fizzy drinks is too high. A regular can of Coca-Cola is found to contain around 6-7 teaspoons of sugar. Refined sugar, as explained above, not only causes an upsurge in blood sugar levels but also leads to obesity. Increased weight also increases risk of heart diseases. Fruit juices are full of fruit sugar which shoots up the blood glucose levels. Whole fruits have less sugar, fewer calories and more fibre, making them a healthier option f Continue reading >>

Can My Eating Habits Cause Diabetes?

Can My Eating Habits Cause Diabetes?

If there were a magic pill, completely eliminating your risk of developing diabetes, would you take it? If you could guarantee your health would never deteriorate, would you be interested in hearing more? Truth is, we cannot change our genetics or certain risk factors, such as ethnicity. But, there are some risk factors you can take charge over. You can be in control of many habits, some of which contribute to chronic diseases. Eating specific foods does not automatically cause diabetes. One high-sugar snack or one high-fat meal does not result in diabetes. Rather, it’s lifestyle and lifelong habits and trends that increase the potential of developing diabetes. Here are some tips to reduce your risk through eating more healthfully. Maintain a Healthy Weight Obesity and overweight are directly associated with type 2 diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that in the United States, one-third of adults and 17% of youth are classified obese (BMI > 30). The trend continues to climb every year. The epidemic of pediatric obesity contributes to the increased incidence of children developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing weight only 5% can reduce risk of developing diabetes dramatically. Keeping weight at a healthy level is key in avoiding diabetes. Move Your Body We have become a society of screens. Computers, laptops, tablets, e-readers, video games, television…. Everywhere you turn, adults and teens and children are staring at a screen of some sort. Long gone are the days where after school time involved riding bikes, climbing trees and playing in the park. To achieve the full benefit of physical activity, marathon running is not required. Simple morning walks, after-dinner bike rides or weekend hikes improve metabolism and burn calories. Incorporating moveme Continue reading >>

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