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Foods That Can Prevent Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

6 Foods That Stop Diabetes

6 Foods That Stop Diabetes

Diabetes is rampant in America with 18.8 million people diagnosed with the disease and 7 million undiagnosed. The majority have Type 2 diabetes, and obesity caused by overeating is generally recognized as the major cause. In addition to eating too much food, we are also consuming the wrong kinds of foods, says Ray Sahelian, M.D., a nationally recognized expert on supplements and author of Mind Boosters. Our diets include too many high-carb, highly processed foods and too many simple sugars, which stress the body, he tells Newsmax Health. The body becomes unable to respond properly to insulin, and the result is diabetes. "With diabetes, the body's pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels," says Dr. Sahelian. "People with Type 1 diabetes produce little or no insulin. People with Type 2 diabetes may continue to produce enough — perhaps even too much — but insulin receptors on cells develop resistance, a condition that prevents the body from using glucose effectively." Sugar continues to circulate in the blood and build up. The health results are devastating and include increased risks for heart disease, nerve damage, blindness, and kidney damage. A diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods fights diabetes, and specific foods help prevent Type 2 diabetes as well as help reverse the condition. Six of the most powerful are: Blueberries. Several studies have found that blueberries help improve insulin sensitivity, reversing the process that leads to diabetes. One government-funded study followed health professionals for as long as 24 years, and found that eating two or more servings of blueberries a week lowered diabetes risk by 23 percent, and another study published in the British Medical Journal found that replaci Continue reading >>

If Diabetes Runs In Your Family, You Need To Read The Latest Study On Fruit

If Diabetes Runs In Your Family, You Need To Read The Latest Study On Fruit

A huge study has revealed what we need to be eating every day to lower our risk of diabetes and related vascular complications. Unfortunately, it’s not ice cream or fries—but it is a simple dietary addition that most of us can easily make: fresh fruit. Huaidong Du, MD, PhD, of Oxford University, England, led the Chinese epidemiological study, which included half a million people and was reported online in PLOS Medicine. According to the research team, each daily portion of fruit consumed linked to a 12 percent reduction in diabetes risk, an association not significantly modified by sex, age, region, survey season, or a range of other factors including smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, body mass index, and family history of the disease. (Find out the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.) “To our knowledge, this is the first large prospective study demonstrating similar inverse associations of fruit consumption with both incident diabetes and diabetic complications,” writes Du and colleagues. In lay language, this means that the more fruit you eat, the lower your risk of diabetes and diabetes complications. “These findings suggest that a higher intake of fresh fruit is potentially beneficial for primary and secondary prevention of diabetes (Here are more foods that should be in a diabetic diet.) Previous research on how to prevent diabetes with fruit consumption has focused mainly on Western populations and typically included processed fruit—instead of only fresh fruit in the Chinese study. Because Chinese people with the disease are likely to cut fresh fruit from their diets due to a mistaken belief that any sweet-tasting food will raise their blood sugar, this may explain the very strong association in this study. Nonetheless, clinic Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Type 2 diabetes prevention tips and facts While genetics plays an important role in the development of diabetes, an individual still has the ability to influence their health to prevent type 2 diabetes. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This article focuses on ways to control risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People should watch their weight and exercise on a regular basis to help reverse prediabetes, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diet is important because it helps with weight loss. Some foods such as nuts in small amounts provide health benefits in blood sugar regulation. There is no single recommended diabetes prevention diet, but following a sound nutrition plan and maintaining a healthy weight are important steps in preventing the disease. Exercise is even more beneficial with weight loss in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Smoking is harmful in many ways including increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are medications available that have been shown in large trials to delay or prevent the onset of overt diabetes. Metformin (Glucophage) is recommended by the American Diabetes Association for prevention of diabetes in high-risk people. The coming years will be very exciting regarding the advances in the field of prevention of diabetes. However, the cornerstone of therapy will likely remain a healthy lifestyle. There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes since there is no know way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regardi Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

Eating Habits That Prevent Diabetes | Reader's Digest

Eating Habits That Prevent Diabetes | Reader's Digest

Your go-to foods don't vary much from day to day Researchers from Tufts University and the University of Texas Health Science Center recently discovered that people who have more diversity in their diets -- perhaps counter-intuitively -- had worse metabolic health, including larger waist circumferences, than people who tended to eat a smaller range of foods every day. "Americans with the healthiest diets actually eat a relatively small range of healthy foods," Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, senior author and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston, said in a press release. "These results suggest that in modern diets, eating 'everything in moderation' is actually worse than eating a smaller number of healthy foods." One additional serving of yogurt a day is linked with an 18 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a large Harvard study. Researchers hypothesize that yogurt's probiotics may help improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation, but more clinical trials are needed to determine this. Total dairy consumption was not associated with diabetes risk, and the study didn't differentiate between yogurt types. People with diabetes are often told to eat six small meals throughout the day, but fewer, bigger meals may be better, according to a new study. Czech researchers analyzed data from a previous study comparing two diets in 54 people with type 2 diabetes. Participants ate six small meals per day for 12 weeks, then a large high-fiber breakfast and lunch (but no dinner) for 12 weeks. When they ate two meals a day,they reported feeling less hungry, lost more weight, had lower blood sugar, and noted stark improvements in mood. If you eat bread at dinner, you save it for the end People with type 2 diabetes had Continue reading >>

These Are The Best Fruits For Preventing Diabetes

These Are The Best Fruits For Preventing Diabetes

In a study published in the BMJ in July 2013, researchers from Harvard University found that eating whole fruits can reduce the risk of developing type-2 diabetes, but some are more effective than others at warding off the disease. The report used data from three long-running health studies that included 151,209 women and 36,173 men, where participants sent back questionnaires about their lifestyle, diet, and health — specifically any diseases they'd developed — every few years for at least two decades. The researchers asked about 10 fruits: grapes or raisins, peaches, plums or apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupe, apples or pears, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, and blueberries. Blueberries were most effective in preventing diabetes, followed by grapes and then apples. Bananas and grapefruit were also good. Strawberries did not have much of an effect and cantaloupe slightly increased the risk for type 2 diabetes. See the chart below: BMJ On the flip side, drinking all kinds of fruit juice, including apple, orange, and grapefruit, was associated with a higher risk of the disease. Replacing three servings of fruit juice each week with blueberries decreased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 33% on average, according to the study. People with type 2 diabetes do not make enough of the hormone insulin, which pulls sugar (glucose) out of the bloodstream and into our cells to be stored and released later. Without enough insulin, bloodsugar hits spikes and troughs. Researchers suggest that blueberries, red grapes, and apples may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes because they contain high levels of anthocyanins, which have been shown to increase glucose uptake in mice with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Reduce Portion Sizes Portion size is the amount of food you eat, such as 1 cup of fruit or 6 ounces of meat. If you are trying to eat smaller portions, eat a half of a bagel instead of a whole bagel or have a 3-ounce hamburger instead of a 6-ounce hamburger. Three ounces is about the size of your fist or a deck of cards. Put less on your plate, Nate. 1. Drink a large glass of water 10 minutes before your meal so you feel less hungry. 2. Keep meat, chicken, turkey, and fish portions to about 3 ounces. 3. Share one dessert. Eat a small meal, Lucille. 4. Use teaspoons, salad forks, or child-size forks, spoons, and knives to help you take smaller bites and eat less. 5. Make less food look like more by serving your meal on a salad or breakfast plate. 6. Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you are full. 7. Listen to music while you eat instead of watching TV (people tend to eat more while watching TV). How much should I eat? Try filling your plate like this: 1/4 protein 1/4 grains 1/2 vegetables and fruit dairy (low-fat or skim milk) Move More Each Day Find ways to be more active each day. Try to be active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Walking is a great way to get started and you can do it almost anywhere at any time. Bike riding, swimming, and dancing are also good ways to move more. If you are looking for a safe place to be active, contact your local parks department or health department to ask about walking maps, community centers, and nearby parks. Dance it away, Faye. 8. Show your kids the dances you used to do when you were their age. 9. Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores. 10. Work out with a video that shows you how to get active. Let's go, Flo. 11. Deliver a message in person to a co-worke Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

5 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most prevalent health issues that people in our country suffer from. It’s the seventh leading cause of death, affecting millions of people in this country daily. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and above were diagnosed with prediabetes, which was 7 million more than we saw in 2010. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans were diagnosed and in 2010, that number was 25.8 million. What’s worse is that over 18,000 of those cases were in youth under the age of 20 years old! Clearly, we have a serious problem here. The Real Question At Hand Could it be that this is just by coincidence, or could the problem with diabetes have something to do with the way our food system has changed over the years? Since sugar is in just about everything and processed, fatty foods make up a large portion of Americans’ diets, clearly, the increase of diabetes has nothing to do with our country just magically becoming unhealthy. Our food industry is feeding us lies about what’s healthy and what’s not, and while our government has made significant changes to school lunch room menus, providing us with calorie counts on fast food and restaurant menus, and even banning soda in some cities, we still have a long way to go. Why would food manufacturers put sugar and toxic fats into our food considering they have no nutritional value whatsoever, if not to make us addicted to them to increase profit? These foods trigger opiates in the brain, much like the protein found in milk known as casein. Opiates create a drugged like feeling inside of us that leads us wanting more and inevitably coming back for more every single time. Why Sugar and Processed Fats Lead to Diabetes Each time we eat more added sugars and toxic fats (like vegetable oils and highly processed fats), we disrup Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat To Help Prevent Diabetes

Foods To Eat To Help Prevent Diabetes

Why is meat consumption a risk factor for diabetes? Why does there appear to be a stepwise reduction in diabetes rates as meat consumption drops? Instead of avoiding something in meat, it may be that people are getting something protective from plants. Free radicals may be an important trigger for insulin resistance, and antioxidants in plant foods may help. Put people on a plant-based diet, and their antioxidant enzymes shoot up. So, not only do plants provide antioxidants, but they may boost our own anti-endogenous antioxidant defenses, whereas, on the conventional diabetic diet, they get worse. In my video, How May Plants Protect Against Diabetes, I discuss how there are phytonutrients in plant foods that may help lower chronic disease prevalence by acting as antioxidants and anti-cancer agents, and by lowering cholesterol and blood sugar. Some, we’re now theorizing, may even be lipotropes, which have the capacity to hasten the removal of fat from our liver and other organs, counteracting the inflammatory cascade believed to be directly initiated by saturated-fat-containing foods. Fat in the bloodstream—from the fat in our bodies or the fat we eat—not only causes insulin resistance, but also produces a low-grade inflammation that can contribute to heart disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fiber may also decrease insulin resistance. One of the ways it may do so is by helping to rid the body of excess estrogen. There is strong evidence for a direct role of estrogens in the cause of diabetes, and it’s been demonstrated that certain gut bacteria can produce estrogens in our colon. High-fat, low-fiber diets appear to stimulate the metabolic activity of these estrogen-producing intestinal bacteria. This is a problem for men, too. Obesity is associated wi Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

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