diabetestalk.net

Foods For Diabetic Wound Healing

Diabetic Wound Care: 3 Foods For Improved Blood Flow

Diabetic Wound Care: 3 Foods For Improved Blood Flow

Diabetic Wound Care: 3 Foods for Improved Blood Flow Ginger can help improve circulation while adding flavor to tea, rice and other foods. Many people may not realize it, but blood flow is an Ginger can help improve circulation while adding flavor to tea, rice and other foods. Many people may not realize it, but blood flow is an important factor in the wound healing process. Diabetics often suffer from poor circulation, and this can result in a loss of sensation in the extremities. In such cases, someone may not notice if he or she has a lesion on the foot, and by not properly caring for the wound can experience infection that becomes gangrenous and requires amputation. Even for those without diabetes, good circulation is essential for the wound site to receive an ample amount of vitamins, nutrients and protective white blood cells. Exercising regularly is important to maintaining healthy circulation, as is being mindful of the foods you eat. Some fruits, vegetables, spices and other edibles are great for improving blood flow, and they can be integrated into the meals you eat everyday in tasty ways. Take a look at these circulation-boosting foods and how to incorporate them into your diet: Many Americans know of ginger as the flavoring in a large number of Asian dishes as well as in holiday cookies. The root of the ginger plant has been ground up and used as a popular spice for thousands of years, and it has also been utilized for its medicinal purposes. The ancient Chinese used ginger for nausea, diarrhea and other digestive issues, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. More recently, it has been found to help maintain healthy blood pressure levels, which is particularly important for people with diabetes and for wound healing. To incorporate ginger Continue reading >>

Ouch! Wound Healing With Diabetes

Ouch! Wound Healing With Diabetes

Join the conversation. register now or log in About the author View all posts by Katie Gutwald, RD Small cuts and blisters on the hands and feet are a nuisance. But for people with diabetes, these problems carry additional risks. You may have heard that diabetes affects wound healing , luckily there are steps you can take to decrease your risk. The most important thing you can do to prevent wounds and promote healing is to maintain a steady glucose level . Lowering A1C to below or around 7% has been shown to reduce microvascular and neuropathic complications of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. 1 Not eating enough calories gives us less energy. It also means that there is not enough energy for our cells to do their jobs, such as healing broken tissue. Make sure that you are always eating enough calories daily. There are supplemental drinks such as Glucerna that can help meet your needs. Speak with your physician if you feel you could benefit from these. Protein is a building block used to make new tissue during the healing process. Eating adequate levels of protein helps our body maintain its healthy status. Some good sources of protein are eggs, chicken, fish, beef, peanut butter and other nuts . Although you may not need extra levels of vitamins or minerals, making sure that you are getting enough each day will help speed the healing process. Consider taking a multivitamin every day.2 Look for one that is age specific to you as our needs change as we age. Make sure that you are getting at least 8 glasses of water per day. Try to avoid sweetened beverages whenever possible. Make sure your physician is aware of any wounds and that you are following them closely. The wounds can heal very slowly, but can get worse very quickly. Remember, prevention with optimal blood glucose c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Wound Healing Through Nutrition And Glycemic Control

Diabetic Wound Healing Through Nutrition And Glycemic Control

Diabetic Wound Healing Through Nutrition and Glycemic Control Nancy Collins, PhD, RD, LD/N, FAPWCA & Colleen Sloan, RD, LD/N Diabetes has quickly become one of the most complex health challenges of the 21st century. In 2010, a total of 10.9 million US residents ages 65 years and older were reported to be living with diabetes.1 Currently, it is the seventh-leading cause of death in the US, totaling 4.6 million deaths in 2011 (with healthcare expenditures reaching more than $471 billion.)2 A condition that increases ones risk for heart disease and stroke, diabetes is also the leading cause of kidney failure, new cases of blindness among adults, and non-traumatic lower-limb amputations. Approximately 15% of individuals who live with diabetes develop a foot ulcer, and 84% of this population will end up with lower-leg amputations.3 Several factors can disrupt wound healing. Without proper nutrition, a normal wound can rapidly become a chronic, infected wound. However, it is possible for wound care providers to reduce the huge economic burden and life-threatening complications of diabetes by implementing timely, easy-to-use interventions. Comprehensive diet and nutrition management have been shown to promote optimal glycemic control and facilitate wound prevention and healing. As such, all healthcare professionals should know how to adequately manage blood glucose levels to support wound healing in patients living with diabetes. This article explains how uncontrolled blood sugar impairs wound healing and offers practical nutrition recommendations and guidelines that promote healing, as well as simple suggestions to prevent further complications and comorbidities. Diabetes often causes slow-healing wounds that can worsen rapidly with elevated blood glucose levels serving as t Continue reading >>

Slow Healing Of Cuts And Wounds

Slow Healing Of Cuts And Wounds

Tweet Wounds or sores that take more than a few weeks to heal might be infected and require medical treatment, and often indicate an underlying disease such as diabetes. When you cut or burn yourself, your body begins a three-stage process to repair the damaged skin. First, an immune response causes the wound to become inflamed to prevent infections. Second, new cells (a scab) form over the wound, and finally scar tissue forms to heal the wound. Some wounds heal easily while others can take longer, particularly if they are severe or the individual has a poor state of health. Causes of slow wound healing There are a number of things that can delay or complicate the healing of wounds, including: Diabetes and slow healing wounds High levels of blood glucose caused by diabetes can, over time, affect the nerves (neuropathy) and lead to poor blood circulation, making it hard for blood - needed for skin repair - to reach areas of the body affected by sores or wounds. This can cause them to remain open and unhealed for months, increasing the risk of: Fungal infections Bacterial infections Gangrene Keeping blood glucose levels under good control can help to reduce the risk of slow healing wounds now and further in the future. Slow healing wounds can be a symptom of undiagnosed diabetes, particularly if other symptoms are also present. Slow healing of wounds, including cuts, grazes and blisters, can be particularly problematic if they affect the feet of someone with diabetes and if not treated properly, can raise the risk of amputation. It is important therefore that people with diabetes check their feet daily and report any signs of damage to their health team. When to see your doctor If you do not have diabetes and a cut or burn is taking a long time to heal or showing signs of Continue reading >>

Top Healing Foods To Repair Body And Reverse Your Diabetes

Top Healing Foods To Repair Body And Reverse Your Diabetes

Consistent (low-impact) exercise, combined with strength training Avoidance of "dead" processed foods and beverages Avoidance of prescription/OTC and recreational drugs You may be asking why it's important to wean off the drugs as quickly as possible. If you happen to be on insulin, you may not be eligible for certain jobs in the workplace, e.g. pilot, traffic controller, operator of heavy machinery. Consequently, it is important to (safely) wean off the insulin so that you are eligible for those jobs. Also, the longer you stay on a drug, the more dependent your body becomes on that drug. Plus, the drugs keep your body in a diabetic state and inhibit or slow down the healing process. As depicted in the following diagram(from the author's Science of Diabetes book), foods provide key nutrients in the form of macronutrients (such as carbs, proteins, and fats); and, also, in the form of micronutrients (such as vitamins and minerals). These nutrients, when obtained from healthy foods on a regular basis, are key to reversing your diabetes and achieving optimum health. From a nutritional science perspective, food is comprised of macronutrients and micronutrients. Thesemacronutrients will promote an overall effect upon your health and willhelp repair the damage caused by a disease such as diabetes. Note: For more information about nutritional science, get the author's Science of Diabetes book . We need adequate Carbohydrates from green and bright-colored vegetables and dark-colored fruits to generate the energy for your cells to do their job. Carbohydrates provide vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, fiberand glucose, which is necessary for cellular growth, fibroblastic mobility, leukocyte activity, cell-to-cell communications, and other activities during the inflammatory phase. Continue reading >>

Tips For Diabetes Wound Care

Tips For Diabetes Wound Care

A small cut can turn into a large complication when diabetes enters the picture. For one thing, diabetes can lead to a weakened immune system "so a simple cut or scrape can get infected easier than in someone who doesn’t have diabetes,” said Kiersten Weber, DPM, a podiatrist with the University of Oklahoma's Harold Hamm Diabetes Center in Oklahoma City. Neuropathy or nerve damage, one of the many diabetes side effects, also can play a role. Neuropathy can occur because extra sugar in the bloodstream can damage your nerves over time. “It usually starts in the smallest blood vessels, which are in the hands and feet,” explains Dr. Weber, and when you have neuropathy, you have decreased feeling in your feet. As a result, you may not feel pain if you have a cut or blister on your foot, and if you don’t know it’s there and don’t treat it, the sore could become infected. That’s why regularly inspecting your feet for cuts, scrapes, blisters, calluses, and other wounds is such an important part of diabetes care, she said. “If you can’t lift your feet, have someone do it for you and look at the bottom of your feet,” Weber said. “You also can use mirrors to inspect the bottom of your feet if you need.” Preventing Cuts and Scrapes Of course, the best way to protect yourself is to make a serious effort to prevent wounds. Make sure you never walk barefoot, even inside your home, and always wear good-fitting shoes. “I also tell my patients to check the inside of their shoes for stones,” Weber said. “If you have neuropathy, you could get a small stone in your shoe and not know it.” Protect your feet by letting your podiatrist handle even minor foot issues. Don’t try to remove calluses or warts yourself.You might be tempted to try commercial preparati Continue reading >>

How Your Diet Can Aid In Wound Healing

How Your Diet Can Aid In Wound Healing

Without proper nutrition, the whole process of wound healing can be negatively impacted. Your diet during recovery plays a critical role in how fast your wound heals, how strong the wound tissue becomes, the duration of the recovery period and how well your body fights off infection. A poor diet can turn a normal wound into a chronic wound that never seems to be get better. The Catabolic Phase Even a small wound can alter the way your body metabolizes nutrients. As the body attempts to heal itself from a wound, it will create stress hormones and divert extra resources – carbohydrates, fats, proteins, antioxidants and more – to the creation of new tissue. This is referred to as the catabolic phase of healing. Your metabolism essentially speeds up during this process. If the catabolic phase drags on too long, protein energy malnutrition (PEM) can set in. This begins a negative cycle which slows wound healing and deteriorates your health. Your body sends extra protein to deal with the wound and, as a consequence, other important body systems and organs don't receive enough protein. This leads to reduced muscle mass and delayed wound healing. Protein is the most important aspect of your diet when healing from a wound. Energy (calories from carbohydrates and fats), amino acids, antioxidants and minerals (zinc) are also important. Your dietary needs will be calculated on an individual basis, and your doctor or nutritionist may adjust the levels of each nutrient to facilitate healing. The following guidelines are only generalizations, but will give you an idea of what your diet should include. Protein Protein helps repair the damaged tissue from your wound. You'll want to take in more protein than usual to help the healing process. This means 2 to 3 servings of protein a d Continue reading >>

Nutrition Guidelines To Improve Wound Healing

Nutrition Guidelines To Improve Wound Healing

Why is good nutrition important for wound healing? Good nutrition is necessary for healing. During the healing process, the body needs increased amounts of calories, protein, vitamins A and C, and sometimes the mineral zinc. The following guidelines will help you choose “power” foods to promote healing. Goals for healthy eating Eat a variety of foods to get all the calories, proteins, vitamins, and minerals you need. MyPlate displays the different food groups. To personalize your plan, go to choosemyplate.gov. Click on SuperTracker online tool. Next, create your own plan to obtain a specific nutritional plan to meet your needs based on age, gender, and activity level. If you have a prescribed diet, follow it as much as possible, as it will help promote wound healing and may prevent infection and some complications. Food Group: Grains, using whole grain sources as much as possible Number of servings: 5 What counts as 1 serving: 1 slice bread; 1/2 cup cooked cereal; 1 cup ready-to-eat cereal; 1/2 cup cooked rice or pasta Food Group: Vegetables Number of servings: 2 What counts as 1 serving: 1 cup raw or cooked vegetable or 100% vegetable juice; 2 cups raw leafy green vegetables Food Group: Fruits. Number of servings: 2 What counts as 1 serving: 1/2 cup canned fruit or 1/4 cup dried fruit Food Group: Milk Number of servings: 3 What counts as 1 serving: 1 cup milk or yogurt; 1 1/2 ounces natural cheese; 2 ounces processed cheese (dairy or soy) Food Group: Meats and beans Number of servings: 5 1 ounce meat, fish, or poultry; 1/4 cup cooked beans; 1 egg; 1 tablespoon peanut butter; 1/2 ounce nuts or seeds; 1.5-2 ounces firm tofu Food Group: Oils, fats, and sugar Number of servings: Good source of calories, but these may be limited by prescribed diets Vegetable oils (canol Continue reading >>

Better Nutrition Boosts Diabetic Foot Outcomes

Better Nutrition Boosts Diabetic Foot Outcomes

The evidence documenting the role of nutrition in improving wound healing and neuropathy symptoms hasn’t been widely publicized, particularly among lower extremity healthcare practitioners. But getting that information to your diabetic patients could help save their feet. Practitioners who care for diabetic patients with neuropathy and an elevated risk of foot ulcers tend to agree on one thing: there is no one-treatment-fits-all solution. It takes a team of specialists working together, assessing patients one by one, to arrive at an effective treatment plan. And what lower extremity practitioners may not realize is that nutrition is a key part of that multidisciplinary equation. “What we don’t do well in medicine is evaluate nutritional status,” said David Armstrong, DPM, MD, PhD, professor of surgery and director of the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance at the University of Arizona in Tucson. “It is to our patients’ detriment that we don’t focus on this. If we ignore our feet, they’re going to go away. And by ignoring our nutrition, maybe we’re ignoring our feet. Whether we’ve taken it seriously in medical or nursing school, I think it’s important that we focus on it as we practice and in the research we do.” For patients with diabetes, evaluating nutritional status starts with evaluating blood glucose levels, which can affect both peripheral neuropathy and wound healing. But even blood sugar management requires more than a cookie-cutter approach, according to Wanda Howell, PhD, RD, university distinguished professor of nutrition science at the University of Arizona. “The emphasis for everybody on a team is to work with people, and follow up over the course of their management of diabetes to try to bring blood sugar within a reasonable ra Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

When you have diabetes, it's vital to treat foot injuries right away. Even minor wounds can turn into serious foot ulcers, which can cost you a foot -- or an entire leg -- if you don’t care for them quickly and thoroughly. These easy steps can prevent problems down the road. Common Causes What you put on your feet matters. "You can get a foot ulcer from something as simple as walking in new or tight-fitting shoes or getting a small pebble stuck in the shoe,” says Raul Guzman, MD, a vascular surgeon at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. If you have diabetes, you may get a kind of nerve damage that stops the feeling in your feet. Doctors call this neuropathy. If you can’t feel your feet, you may not know you’re hurt, and a small cut or sore can turn into something bigger. Or you might have poor blood flow to your feet, which makes it hard for even minor cuts to heal. Your doctor can tell you whether you have nerve damage or blood-flow problems. Guzman says he can do a test that shows how blood moves through your body. If the results are normal, you can have standard wound-care treatments. “If the results of this blood-flow test are abnormal, that means you have poor circulation that needs to be repaired,” he says. Surgery can help. “We can use a balloon and stent,” Guzman says, “or we can do a bypass procedure, where we connect the artery above the blockage to one of the arteries in the calf or foot.” Wound Treatment Options If you do injure your foot, don't try to take care of it at home. Go to a wound-care center or your doctor, even for blisters, calluses, and scratches. “Put on some antibiotic ointment and see a wound center or your doctor, at the latest, the next day,” says Harold Brem, MD, chief of the wound healing and regenerative medici Continue reading >>

Did You Know That Food Can Help Wounds Heal?

Did You Know That Food Can Help Wounds Heal?

Did You Know That Food Can Help Wounds Heal? People with diabetes do not heal as efficiently as people with normal blood sugar levels. Certain foods can help your wounds heal and also help keep your blood sugar optimal. Eggs (egg whites have protein and no cholesterol) Cheese (low fat is better for your heart) Nut butters (peanut butter, almond butter, cashew butter, etc.) Starch (bread whole grains are best cereal, noodles, rice, barley, kasha) Starchy vegetables (sweet or white potatoes, corn, peas, beans) Non-starchy vegetables (broccoli, green beans, asparagus, salad greens) Fat allows you to absorb your fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, K: Oil (olive and canola oil are best for your heart) Nuts (are good for your heart and health) The following vitamins are excellent to heal wounds most efficiently: ** Egg yolks contain vitamins and cholesterol while egg whites contain protein Marci SloaneMarci Sloane, MS, RD, LD/N, CDE, is a registered and licensed dietitian/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator. She grew up in NYC where she graduated with a degree in Nutrition and Physiology from Teachers College at Columbia University. For over a decade, Marci managed a Diabetes and Nutrition Education Center at a multi-bed hospital in South Florida and has been counseling people on healthy eating, weight loss, and managing diseases and conditions such as: diabetes, pre-diabetes, healthy eating, heart disease, weight loss, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, hypertension, hypoglycemia and a host of other nutrition-related diseases. Marci is an American Diabetes Association Valor Award recipient and lectures frequently to the public and healthcare professionals. Marci was a featured panelist for the Sun-Sentinel's "Let's Take It Off" weight loss program, was highlighted in Continue reading >>

5 Nutrition Tips To Promote Wound Healing

5 Nutrition Tips To Promote Wound Healing

5 Nutrition Tips to Promote Wound Healing 5 Nutrition Tips to Promote Wound Healing Published July 21, 2015 We've all had a wound: a cut, scratch or scrape that breaks the skin. Most wounds on healthy people heal quickly when kept clean and free of infection, while other types of wounds are more serious and often require medical intervention. These can include decubitus ulcers, also known as pressure sores or bed sores, which develop where bones are close to the skin such as ankles, back, elbows, heels and hips in people who are bedridden, use a wheelchair or are unable to change their position. People with diabetes also have a higher risk of developing foot ulcers that can take weeks or months to heal. Food choices and nutritional status influence wound healing since serious wounds increase the energy, vitamin, mineral and protein requirements necessary to promote healing. Also, nutrients are lost in the fluid that weeps from wounds. The first priority is to eat sufficient calories from a balanced diet of nutritious foods. Plan healthy, balanced meals and snacks that include plenty of foods from all the MyPlate food groups protein, fruits, vegetables, dairy and grains. Include optimum amounts of protein. Aim for 20 to 30 grams of protein at each meal and 10 to 15 grams of protein with each snack. A piece of cooked chicken, lean meat or fish the size of a deck of cards (about 3 ounces) contains 20 to 25 grams of protein. One egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter and 1 ounce of cheese each contain 6 to 7 grams of protein. One cup of low-fat milk or yogurt contains 8 grams of protein. Stay well-hydrated with water and other unsweetened beverages such as tea, coffee, 100-percent fruit juice and milk, which also contains protein. Some wounds may require a higher intake of cer Continue reading >>

Nutrition 411: The Diabetic Foot Ulcer Can Diet Make A Difference?

Nutrition 411: The Diabetic Foot Ulcer Can Diet Make A Difference?

Nutrition 411: The Diabetic Foot Ulcer Can Diet Make a Difference? Liz Friedrich, MPH, RD, CSG, LDN; and Nancy Collins, PhD, RD, LD/N, FAPWCA The statistics are shocking: 25.8 million Americans, or 8.3% of the population of the US, has been diagnosed with diabetes.1 Among the complications of the disease are diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which affect as many as 20% of patients with diabetes during their lifetime.2 DFUs can significantly impair a patients quality of life, require prolonged hospitalization, involve infection and gangrene, and may ultimately result in amputation. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has established evidence-based nutrition recommendations for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. These guidelines focus on increasing micro- and macronutrients to promote wound healing.3 Unfortunately, no such guidelines exist for treating DFUs, and it is unclear if recommendations for pressure ulcers can be extrapolated to DFUs. However, it appears that nutrition does play an important role. A poor diet can result in altered immune function, malnutrition, and poor glycemic control, all of which are risk factors for poor healing.4,5 Achieving and maintaining a healthy body weight can help maximize wound healing because glycemic control can be negatively affected by obesity.6 Healthcare professionals (HCPs) should encourage patients with DFUs to consume a healthy diet that contains nutrient-dense foods. A registered dietitian (RD) skilled in medical nutrition therapy for diabetes can assess, treat, and monitor patients with DFUs to help them meet their complex nutritional needs. Compromised immune function is one factor associated with nonhealing wounds; it affects wound healing in a number of ways.4 Protein-energy malnutrition is asso Continue reading >>

What’s The Connection Between Diabetes And Wound Healing?

What’s The Connection Between Diabetes And Wound Healing?

Diabetes is a result of your body’s inability to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose, or sugar, into energy. If your body has difficulty metabolizing glucose, it can lead to high blood sugar levels. This can affect your body’s ability to heal wounds. In people with diabetes, wounds tend to heal more slowly and progress more quickly, so it’s important to know what to look out for. Although cuts, grazes, scratches, and blisters can occur anywhere on the body, the feet are one of the most common places of injury. A small wound on the foot can quickly develop into a foot ulcer. Foot ulcers can become serious if left untreated. Between 14 and 24 percent of people who have diabetes and develop an ulcer will end up having a lower limb amputation. For this reason, it’s crucial that you do regular self-checks and closely monitor any wounds closely. Catching wounds early is the only way to reduce your risk of complications. Keep reading to learn more about the healing process, ways to speed the healing process along, and how to improve your body’s healing powers long-term. When you have diabetes, a number of factors can affect your body’s ability to heal wounds. High blood sugar levels Your blood sugar level is the main factor in how quickly your wound will heal. When your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it: prevents nutrients and oxygen from energizing cells prevents your immune system from functioning efficiently increases inflammation in the body’s cells These effects slow down wound healing. Neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy can also result from having blood sugar levels that are consistently higher than normal. Over time, damage occurs to the nerves and vessels. This can cause the affected areas to lose sen Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Wound Healing

Diabetes And Wound Healing

Diabetes can cause wounds to heal more slowly. This raises the risk that someone with diabetes will develop infections and other complications. A person who manages their diabetes well can improve wound healing and reduce the chances of developing a serious infection. Those with diabetes may find that different types of wounds are slow to heal. Minor wounds, cuts, and burns are a part of life, but for people with diabetes, they can cause serious health issues. Many people with diabetes develop wounds that are slow to heal or never heal. Wounds that do not heal well can become infected. An infection can spread locally, to surrounding tissue and bone, or to further away areas of the body. In some cases, they may even be fatal. Diabetic foot ulcers affect 15 percent of people with diabetes . These are painful sores that can ultimately lead to foot amputation. Even when a wound does not become infected, it can affect a person's health and quality of life. Cuts or injuries on the feet or legs can make it difficult to walk or exercise without pain. Keeping diabetes under control can reduce the risk of slow-healing wounds and complications, including foot ulcers. A 2013 study found a clear correlation between blood glucose and wound healing. People undergoing surgery for chronic diabetes wounds were more likely to fully heal if their blood glucose was well-controlled at the time of surgery. Diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood glucose levels. When blood glucose remains chronically high, it impairs the function of white blood cells, resulting in an inability to fight bacteria. Diabetes, particularly if uncontrolled, is also associated with poor circulation. As circulation slows, red blood cells move more slowly. This makes it more difficult for the bod Continue reading >>

More in diabetes