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Food Allergies And Type 2 Diabetes

Food Allergies And Diabetes

Food Allergies And Diabetes

Posted by Catherine | November 8, 2015 | Diabetic Diet | 0 | Food allergies and diabetes are really not a great combination. Although food sensitivity can have a variety of symptoms results they very often leave you feeling tired and jaded. Managing diabetes is hard enough without the added complication of food sensitivities. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic condition and food intolerances can trigger inflammation, destruction of cells in the form of an autoimmune disease and insulin resistance can be triggered by food intolerances. What that means in plain English is if you have a food intolerance or a combination food intolerances it may be far harder for you if not impossible to cure your diabetes. Fortunately, food allergies are very rare they affect less than 1% of the population. Food intolerance of food sensitivity is a milder form of allergy and these effect about 20% of the population. Food intolerance tends also to be to specific groups of products. The main culprits are Wheat-based bread and cereals and wheat bran products. Processed bread cakes pastries biscuits and cookies Dairy products, especially cows milk and cows milk cheese Food additives such as monosodium glutinate and tartrazine and yellow additives Because these intolerances are so common to this types of foods you often get an immediate improvement. The first step is to eliminate the first five group for two weeks. If there is an immediate improvement there is no need to go any further but if you feel better after three weeks it is worth eliminating the next five culprits and they are: Tomatoes, peppers and aubergines, and potatoes If you feel better after two weeks it is worth staying off the first big five group and reintroduce each week one food from the second group. When you reintroduce a foo Continue reading >>

Allergies & Diabetes

Allergies & Diabetes

From fall leaves to spring pollen, allergies can strike during any season. People might be allergic to dust, pollen, animals, certain foods and other common environmental elements. Because people with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to allergies, it is essential to discover how to minimize the symptoms. Allergies and Diabetes are both Autoimmune Disorders The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology reports approximately 50 million Americans suffer from allergies. Allergies are an autoimmune disorder as is type 1 diabetes. Many people with type 1 or 2 diabetes may also have allergies. The body’s natural response to allergens is to fight them. As a result, you experience symptoms such as sneezing, watery eyes, congestion, and a dry throat. Sometimes your eyes are itchy, and you get swelling of the face, lips, tongue or hands. Other symptoms may include chest heaviness or tightness and difficulty breathing as well as a stomach discomfort and bloating. The Ramifications of Dehydration: Allergies and Diabetes Allergies may cause your body to become dehydrated. When people with diabetes suffer dehydration, it may lead to fluctuating blood sugar levels and an elevated heart rate. Drink plain filtered water throughout the day to prevent the release of histamines. Your body releases histamine to stop water loss, and this triggers allergy symptoms. Stay hydrated to eliminate allergy symptoms and avoid blood sugar surges. When you exercise, keep bottled water handy to avoid dehydration. Foods and Allergy Symptoms Certain foods may aggravate allergy symptoms. You may need to avoid beverages and foods that produce mucous such as dairy products including milk, cheese, yogurt and ice cream. Be aware that alcohol, such as red wine, contains sulfites and may cause alle Continue reading >>

The Dairy Connection: Type 2 Diabetes And Lactose

The Dairy Connection: Type 2 Diabetes And Lactose

The subject of this article offers a few different scenarios: 1. to determine your risk of developing type 2 diabetes when you are lactose intolerant. 2. If you already have Type 2 diabetes what is your chance/ risk of developing lactose intolerance. Dairy reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes as well as managing glucose levels in those who have Type 2 diabetes. Along with helping to control glucose levels, dairy products contain many nutrients that are vital to developing healthy bones and teeth. However, there are individuals who are not able to consume dairy products in the recommended amounts because their bodies are not able to break down lactose. Lactose is found in milk and milk products and someone who is lactose intolerance finds it difficult to consume dairy products. This intolerance can be managed by working with a dietitian to properly limit dairy intake or possibly taking a supplement. Benefits of a Diet that Includes Dairy Products Dairy is an important part of a nutritious diet because it often offers healthy sources of protein, calcium, potassium, and vitamin D. Each of these nutrients plays a significant role in maintaining a healthy body. Calcium is required for healthy teeth and bones. In most American diets, dairy products are the main source of calcium. Potassium is important because it is helpful in maintaining a healthy blood pressure. Further reading: Vitamin D allows the body to maintain the appropriate levels of calcium which makes it an essential vitamin in the diet. When dairy products are consumed regularly, there is a reduced risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes. Full Fat Dairy vs Low Fat When choosing dairy products at a grocery store, you will find that there are many different ch Continue reading >>

Food Sensitivity, Allergy Or Food Intolerance

Food Sensitivity, Allergy Or Food Intolerance

Food Sensitivity, Allergy or Food Intolerance Posted by Catherine | November 7, 2015 | Allergies , Diabetic Diet | 0 | How did you feel after breakfast this morning? How did you feel after breakfast yesterday or after lunch? The food that you eat will have a direct influence on how you feel. You may have felt alert or energetic or lethargic or bloated but, however, he felt will have been a result of the food you ate. It may well be that you have Food Sensitivity, Allergy or Food Intolerance. Food affects the way we feel but it also affects how we function physically and emotionally. It determines how much concentration we have, it determines how happy we are or how bad tempered we are. To maintain peak performance, its necessary to make sure that all the nutrients in our food get from our digestive system and into our bloodstream. That may be stating the obvious but it seems that for a growing number of people this doesnt happen. An allergy is merely an abnormal response to a normal substance. This can be food or it can be an external substance such as pollen or pet dander. When the substance you are allergic to enters your body your immune system has to react. It produces large quantities of sensitising antibodies which immediately attach themselves to cell membranes. This causes them to erupt and release a number of chemicals and toxins including histamine and leukotrienes. Not surprisingly this causes a great deal of havoc the nasal and sinus cavities block up, the vessels delete there may be sneezing, runny noses, watery eyes, a rash on the skin and muscle spasms. The severity and the type of response depend on the area of the body affected in severe cases it may be accompanied by diarrhoea or vomiting, migraine and restricted breathing. Food allergies are in fact Continue reading >>

Food Intolerance Linked To Diabetes

Food Intolerance Linked To Diabetes

According to recent reports in the diabetes news, over 50% of the British population could have some form of food intolerance that results in weight gain , diabetes and other complications . The figures are particularly alarming when considered in the context of soaring diabetes diagnoses figures in the last few years. The news was reported by Allergy UK, a charity initiated to aid those suffering from food allergies. Cyndi O'Meara, an expert nutritionist , was reported as commenting: "There's been a 10 fold increase in people with food intolerances in the UK in the last 25 years. A big part of the problem is that we are assaulting our children with chemicals because the food that we are feeding them isn't real anymore, it's just a bunch of food additives, flavourings and colourings. If it's not margarine then it is modified milk, artificial sweeteners, and manmade sugars all of this has been put into the diet over the last 25 years which has resulted in hyper sensitive immune systems that react to everything a person eats." The reason for food intolerance could be down to the stress of modern life, food additives and pollutants all increasing chronic inflammatory conditions. Exactly how this influences pre-diabetes remains to be seen. Continue reading >>

When Healthy Food Makes You Sick: Food Intolerances.

When Healthy Food Makes You Sick: Food Intolerances.

Allergies increasingly cause health problems. Approximately 1-2% of adults suffer from a Type I (immediate reaction) food allergy. In extreme cases these allergies can be life threatening. Type III (delayed reaction) food allergies, however, are estimated to affect up to 40% of the population. These allergies are also commonly called food intolerances or sensitivities. Type III (delayed reaction) food allergies, are estimated to affect up to 40% of the population. Allergies develop when your immune system fails to recognize a food ingredient as a nutrient and treats it instead as a foreign object. When the immune system identifies a foreign object as harmful, it will create antibodies to combat them. The antibodies that are formed in the case of Type III allergies (food intolerance) are IgG antibodies.IgG antibodies develop in your blood from continually eating the offending food. Sometimes the body reaches a threshold where it no longer tolerates that food and it is treated like an invader in your system. The body produces an inflammatory response and if we continue having the offending food we see the physical symptoms appear hours or even days after consumption. This low grade inflammation settles in all different parts of the body and can manifest itself in many different symptoms. Some people suffer gastrointestinal problems like diarrhoea, flatulence and bloating. For others it may also cause reactions of the skin such as eczema and psoriasis. Headaches as well as disorders of the joints may also be the result of food intolerance. For others still, it is the inability to lose weight even though the calorie intake has been modified. Type III food allergies can also lead to chronic diseases over time such as IBS, diabetes type 2, Chrohns disease, etc. Difference bet Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Food Allergies: The Connection?

Diabetes And Food Allergies: The Connection?

Food allergies can make diabetes difficult to manage. An allergy is a reaction of your immune system to a substance that is not considered foreign to your body. What makes them worse is that they show little visible symptoms. Food allergies complicate the way the condition responds to the treatment being undertaken. There can be some metabolism complications of that can be caused by food allergies. Moreover, intolerances can make the condition more difficult to control and even irreversible at times. Some of the complications that food allergies or other intolerances can trigger are auto-immune cell destruction, inflammation and insulin resistance. Food allergies give rise to insulin resistance after the body swells up (oedema). Oedema is a response to the inflammation which contributes to the diabetic type conditions in the body. Inflammation caused by saturated fats is also one of the main triggers of an adverse diabetic response to food intolerance. Saturated fats cause the immune cells release a protein interleukin-1 Beta which is inflammatory. This protein reacts with various organs and tissues and resists insulin. Auto-immune responses are generally the effect of food allergies common with diabetes. Insulin resistance can result from many causes, which include food allergies and other intolerances. These can come in many forms. The highly processed food that we eat these days, which is full of chemicals, can cause the very process of ingestion can to chronic inflammation in some cases. This chronic inflammation disturbs the normal body processes such as insulin production. This creates a vicious cycle. Given such a relation between allergies and diabetics, they should consider food allergy testing. (Images:Getty) Read more articles on Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Managing Food Allergies & Diabetes

Managing Food Allergies & Diabetes

People with food allergies become unconsciously aware of everything that enters their mouths. The same can be said for people with diabetes who are required to manage their insulin levels each day. The relationship between food allergies and diabetes is undeniable. A food allergy can prompt a diabetic response, in turn complicating anti-diabetic treatments. Diabetes Mellitus, a metabolic disorder, can become harder to control when food allergies arise. When food intolerance occurs, inflammation and insulin resistance may be triggered. At The Allergy and Environmental Treatment Center, LLC, Dr. Liszewski and the esteemed allergy team are committed to a holistic approach to allergy treatment. We look for the underlying cause of the patient’s allergy, addressing potential and harmful triggers, while focusing on maintaining optimal health. If you or someone you know is looking for a reliable and helpful allergy management facility in Scottsdale or the Phoenix-metro area, contact The Allergy and Environmental Treatment Center, LLC today. It is necessary to eliminate or cut back saturated fat from your diet if you struggle with insulin resistance. According to research from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, saturated fats promote activity of immune cells to emit interleukin-1 Beta, an inflammatory protein. Interleukin-1 Beta is known for causing organs and tissues to resist insulin. Food allergies also cause cells to become inflamed, leading to insulin resistance. This process, called edema, is a common diabetic type response. Food allergies and intolerances can cause insulin resistance. Ingesting certain foods cause inflammation, disrupting insulin production and other bodily processes. Being cognizant of your diet improves the health of your digestive s Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

Food Intolerance May Cause Diabetes | Science | The Guardian

Food Intolerance May Cause Diabetes | Science | The Guardian

A common type of diabetes that affects young people may be caused by an adverse reaction to food, scientists have found. Suspicion has fallen on diet as a trigger for type 1 diabetes, which is usually diagnosed in childhood, following the surprise discovery that the condition is genetically similar to coeliac disease, a gut disorder caused by intolerance to gluten, a protein found in wheat. Genetic tests on nearly 20,000 people revealed that those with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease shared seven unusual genetic regions that were not seen in healthy volunteers. The finding will prompt scientists to investigate whether gluten or other dietary factors may cause diabetes in young people who are genetically susceptible to the condition. Early-onset diabetes occurs when the body's immune system mistakenly attacks cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, which is needed to control blood sugar levels. Around 250,000 in Britain are diagnosed with the condition, which can lead to blindness, limb amputations, kidney failure and heart disease. Coeliac disease affects about 1% of the population and is also caused by a malfunction in the immune system, but because it attacks gut cells that can grow back, the disease is treatable. "What we need to look at now is if there is a dietary trigger for type 1 diabetes," said David van Heel, a geneticist at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, who co-authored the study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Continue reading >>

Wheat And Dairy

Wheat And Dairy

We avoided dairy, gluten, and other allergenic foods with my youngest child, both while I was pregnant, and in his first few years of life. He breastfed exclusively for 6 months, and for a few years afterwards. He still developed diabetes. There has long been debate (and there are innumerable studies) about cow's milk and type 1 diabetes. Recent studies that have followed children over time do find evidence that cow's milk consumption may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes and/or associated autoimmunity, although perhaps depending on genetic risk. For example: A long-term study of U.S. children (beginning at birth) found that greater consumption of cow's milk was associated with the development of type 1-related autoantibodies-- but only in children of low to moderate risk of disease. However, cow's milk consumption was also associated with an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes in all of the antibody-positive children (Lamb et al. 2014). Published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, a double-blind, randomized study assigned genetically at-risk infants to receive either regular cow's milk infant formula, or a a casein hydrolysate formula, when breastmilk was not available in the first 6-8 months of life. Over the next ten years, the children are being analyzed for type 1 diabetes as well as type 1 related autoantibodies. The first results were hopeful: the children given hydrolyzed infant formula had a 50% lower risk of developing type 1 related autoantibodies by age 10. (Since this study did not include people from the general population, whether this intervention will work in people less genetically at risk of type 1 is not known). This study was part of a larger trial, the TRIGR (Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk). TRIGR began Continue reading >>

Understand The Connection Between Food Allergies And Diabetes

Understand The Connection Between Food Allergies And Diabetes

(NewsTarget) Here is food for thought. Food allergies can actually cause diabetic responses complicating anti-diabetic protocols and treatments. With Diabetes Mellitus being a metabolic disorder, diabetes becomes less controllable or irreversible when other metabolic issues due to food allergies and intolerances arise. Inflammation, auto-immune destruction of cells, and insulin resistance can be triggered by food intolerances. Inflammation The necessity to trim or eliminate saturated fat from the diet has been well documented. It seems that saturated fat not only can affect good heart health, but can also trigger insulin resistance. Research conducted at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that saturated fats cause immune cells to activate and excrete an inflammatory protein called interleukin-1 Beta. This protein interacts with organs and tissues causing them to resist insulin. Dr. William Philpott noted that some food allergies caused body cells to swell (edema) leading to insulin resistance. Edema is a response to inflammation which contributed to diabetic type responses in the body. He and his team observed blood sugar levels of patients before and after meals. When the offending food was removed, the diabetic response vanished in conjunction with the inflammation. The offending foods were usually corn, wheat, and dairy products. Auto-Immune Destruction In some Type 1 diabetics auto-immune responses can play a key role in their diabetes. It is thought that some 75% of Type 1 diabetics are allergic to their own pancreatic cells, which are responsible for insulin production. Research conducted in Australia and Italy has found a correlation between cow's milk and Type 1 diabetes in children. Bovine Serum Albumin is a protein to which some individu Continue reading >>

Allergy Tips For People With Diabetes

Allergy Tips For People With Diabetes

Aaachoooo! It's that time of year again: spring allergy season. For about 1 in 5 people, warm weather brings not only blooming flowers and trees but also the telltale symptoms of hay fever (seasonal allergies) -- sneezing, coughing, runny or stuffy nose, scratchy throat, and itchy eyes. For those with type 2 diabetes, spring allergies don't directly affect blood sugar, but there are things you need to watch out for, says Gerald Bernstein, MD, FACP. HE's the director of the Diabetes Management Program at the Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. For relief from itching, sneezing, and runny nose, you might reach for an over-the-counter (OTC) medication such as an antihistamine, which millions have used safely, Bernstein says. "But when you're throwing something like issues around blood sugar into the mix, you need to be a little more aware of the potential things that can occur." One in five people who use antihistamines become drowsy, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). "So if you take a nap and miss a meal, you can wake up with low blood sugar," Bernstein says. Look for newer antihistamines with less of a sedative effect or talk with a pharmacist about the side effects of various medications. To unclog a stuffy nose, you might choose an OTC or prescription nasal spray, but you might not know that some contain steroids. "Steroids stimulate the liver to make more glucose [blood sugar], so now your liver is beginning to make more sugar," Bernstein says. "And if you're not aware of this, you might be surprised and ask, ‘Why are my numbers high?'" Ask your doctor or pharmacist about nasal sprays without steroids. You have two choices: an OTC decongestant nasal spray or an OTC antihistamine nasal spray. If you cho Continue reading >>

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