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Flying With Type 1 Diabetes

Flying With Type 1 Diabetes

Flying With Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney My children have never been in an airplane not even James, and hes almost 14. Now, dont feel too badly for us. We do lots of cool stuff, and were not completely deprived. I mean, we go to Disneyland regularly, have tons of fun cousins around, and can see the (very tiniest) corner of the Pacific Ocean from our backyard. Im of the impression that every family has some ways that they are very fortunate, and my kids have a pretty good life. We just havent yet had the opportunity to go on vacations or trips where we fly in airplanes. Thats why James and I are so excited about our upcoming trip. In a few weeks well be heading out together to visit our nations capital, Washington, D.C. And were flying! While James has never flown, my travel opportunities since becoming a mom have been broader, though not by much. I did fly internationally last month, and it made me realize that the process with a child with type 1 diabetes might be a little complicated. I thought it was worth poking around and figuring out what kinds of things we could do to make for the best first experience getting through an airport. To find out the best tips for flying, I took to the internet for sure, but I also give a lot of credit to my super-awesome group of real-life moms of kids with type 1 diabetes. Some of these families fly very frequently (thats their familys fortunate thing!). It was great to start a conversation with my friends and get some of their best hints, which I want to share. First, my friends were emphatic that any discussion or list such as this cannot really replace the direct guidance you can get from the TSA website. They have a section for people with diabetes. Go there for the most updated information. Also, if youre traveling with a dev Continue reading >>

Air Travel And Insulin

Air Travel And Insulin

Tweet Travelling abroad with insulin has caused many people with diabetes problems in the past. Despite airline security, people with diabetes are able to carry insulin with them in hand luggage. A letter from your doctor is essential. It should clearly explain the necessity of carrying both insulin and syringes/insulin pump onboard. The letter should explain that you need insulin and you should present it at security to staff. If you encounter further problems, speak with a senior manager because air travel and insulin should no longer be a problem for people with diabetes. Why can’t I just put my insulin in the hold? Research from insulin manufacturers advises that insulin supplies are kept in hand luggage. This is because airline travel can cause baggage to freeze and affect the insulin. If insulin must go into the hold it should be well insulated or housed in an airtight container if possible, and placed as close to the middle of your suitcase as possible. How do I tell if my insulin has been damaged during the flight? You should examine the insulin for any trace of crystals. If some are found, you should discard this insulin and seek local supplies. Keep an accurate testing routine up to make sure your insulin hasn’t been affected. Should I give my insulin to the cabin crew? It can be standard protocol for cabin crew to request all medication for storage during the flight. Will I be allowed on the plane with my insulin and syringes/needles? With a doctor’s letter in hand, there should be no problem boarding with your insulin. However, it is worth checking the airline policy before you travel and phoning them up to make sure if you are concerned. Insulin User identity cards are available from Diabetes UK and independent companies. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitu Continue reading >>

Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes — With Careful Planning, Patients Can Enjoy Adventures Domestically And Abroad

Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes — With Careful Planning, Patients Can Enjoy Adventures Domestically And Abroad

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 15 No. 5 P. 20 Americans with type 1 diabetes are Supreme Court justices, Olympic champions, and professional actors and musicians. As a result, travel is part of their lives. But some people with type 1 diabetes (or their families) are apprehensive about traveling with their condition, especially on long trips away from home. The good news is that dietitians can effectively address these patients’ fears and encourage them to safely venture out. Imagine Allison, a 17-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes who wants to visit the Grand Canyon and participate in various activities while there. Anticipating a river rafting trip, she’s improved her self-care and is using an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). Allison’s endocrinologist says to let her go on the trip, but her parents think the trip is too dangerous, wondering how Allison will keep her insulin cold and her pump dry, and what will happen if her glucose goes too high or too low. Matt, 40, has adult-onset type 1 diabetes and hasn’t traveled since his diagnosis. He hopes to attend his family reunion in Pennsylvania Dutch country. He feels confident about administering the right amount of insulin to normalize his blood glucose after meals and snacks, but he lacks willpower when faced with tempting high-carbohydrate foods. Matt knows he’ll overindulge on shoofly pie and schnitz un knepp (dried apples and ham with dumplings). Plus, he’s worried about airport security and the possibility of being searched. His stress increases his blood glucose level. Both Allison’s parents and Matt assume there are limits to traveling when someone has type 1 diabetes, but dietitians can successfully address these assumptions. Whether patients with diabetes want to hike, Continue reading >>

15 Tips For Traveling With Diabetes

15 Tips For Traveling With Diabetes

I’ve always loved to travel, and so when I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 22, one of my biggest fears was that the disease was going to keep me tethered to home. Thankfully, nearly 14 years later, I’ve learned that diabetes doesn’t have to limit my adventures, as long as I’m thoughtful and prepared – and I’ve been fortunate enough to travel to far-flung places including China, Croatia, Cambodia, Vietnam, Siberia, Mongolia and Tibet. Here are my top 15 tips for how to take your broken pancreas on the road, whether you’re headed someplace exotic, or just relaxing on a beach. Traveling with Diabetes: How to Stay Safe Know how to contact your care team. Talk to your doctor ahead of time about how to get in touch with him or her (or the office) in the case of an emergency, especially if it strikes after hours. It can be helpful, too, to look up local diabetes centers or respected hospitals in the city or countries that you’re traveling to, just in case. Carry a card in your wallet saying that you have diabetes . . . in the language of the country that you’re visiting. (Google Translate can usually take care of this for you, even if its grammar is not entirely correct!) If you’re wearing an insulin pump, say that, too. Get a note from your doctor on professional letterhead saying that the syringes, insulin vials, and other assorted supplies cluttering up your carry-on are medically necessary for your personal diabetes care, and that you should be allowed to keep them with you at all times. This can be helpful going through airport security. Speaking of carry-on bags, never check your diabetes supplies. They have to be in carry-on (if, like, me, you always find yourself in group 5 for boarding, politely explain your situation to the desk a Continue reading >>

The Beginner’s Guide To Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes

The Beginner’s Guide To Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes

A big welcome to The Blonde Abroad’s new Type 1 Diabetes Travel Expert: I’m Cazzy Magennis, a travel writer whose goal is to inspire, motivate and reassure fellow diabetics that despite the hard times, and the down days, we can still achieve everything we want to in life– including travelling to anywhere in the world. I’ve partnered with The Blonde Abroad to bring you the best tips and guides for managing diabetes while travelling around the world! If you aren’t diabetic but are curious as to what it is and would like to learn more, then read more here. So, you have type 1 diabetes, its stressful and but you don’t want it to hold you back… then don’t! Travelling and exploring the world is a beautiful thing, and nothing should stop you; with careful planning and consideration you too can explore everywhere you want to. This is what I did, I don’t let diabetes slow me down, I work hard, and I travel, not without issues, but that’s all part of life. Here’s my step-by-step guide to get you traveling with Type 1 diabetes! Unfortunately if your control is bad and you are constantly in hospital, or in severe hypos, then I definitely would not recommend travelling just yet! Try and get yourself in better control by discussing options with your Diabetic specialist nurse or doctor, get yourself in better health as to minimize any complications when you are away. However, if you are having the usual random highs and lows with type one diabetes… then that’s nothing to stop you– I am not perfect, but I travel fine. You know yourself! Remember your health is the most important thing… if you don’t have it, you can’t explore! Before you go on an adventure, let your diabetic team know you are heading away– they can give you advice on the type of clima Continue reading >>

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

Whether it is for business or pleasure, you have to pass through security before boarding your flight. The TSA allows for diabetes-related supplies, equipment and medication—including liquids—through the checkpoint once they have been properly screened by X-ray or hand inspection. If possible, pack all your supplies together in your carry-on bag so you have everything on hand. Before your screening begins, inform the officer conducting the screening about any supplies on you or in your carry-on. Here’s how you can fly through TSA with these 5 diabetes devices! 1. Insulin Pump/Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common, but it’s always a good idea to carry the Airport Information Card when traveling. You may go through the airport metal detector with your insulin pump and CGM, as these devices are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference. However, we do not recommend going through an airport body scanner with your pump and CGM, as Medtronic has not determined advanced imaging technology to be safe for insulin pump or CGM devices. If you do go through an airport body scanner, be sure to remove your insulin pump and CGM, but do not send your devices through the x-ray machine as an alternative. If you do not wish to remove your devices, explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle, and request an alternative pat-down screening process. 2. Insulin Delivery Devices Be sure to have proof a physician prescribed your insulin and needles by providing a professional, pre-printed pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. You will need these items in Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Safe Overseas Travel When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

6 Tips For Safe Overseas Travel When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which a patient’s pancreas stops producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that enables a person to derive energy from the food they consume. Essentially, the body’s natural immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells – called the beta cells – in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes strikes children and adults at any age, causing dependence on insulin injections or pumped insulin for life. According to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), as many as three million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and the prevalence in those under age 20 appears to be rising. Travelers with Type 1 diabetes face a wide range of risks that have little effect on healthy travelers. Some of those risks include: Changes in physical activity Meals away from your typical diet Too much or too little sleep Impact of stress Even something as simple as a mild sunburn can have an affect on a diabetic traveler’s blood sugar level and cause a range of problems. Before any trip, a traveler with Type 1 diabetes has to take extra precautions. See the following tips for a safe trip when you have Type 1 diabetes. 1. See your Doctor Ahead of Time Your regular doctor will be able to give you some support including: A letter to explain your insulin pump, injection supplies, etc. A prescription for any medications you need If you need immunizations for your trip, you’ll want to have those well ahead of time and with your regular doctor so you have plenty of time to recover before you leave. See our Essential Pre-travel Health Checklist for additional tips. You should have more than enough insulin, syringes, test strips, and other supplies for your trip, but pack extra in case you experience a need for more insulin. 2. Be Prepared for an Continue reading >>

Perspectives On Long-distance Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes.

Perspectives On Long-distance Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes.

Perspectives on Long-Distance Air Travel with Type 1 Diabetes. Pinsker JE, et al. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2017. 1 William Sansum Diabetes Center , Santa Barbara, CA. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2017 Dec;19(12):744-748. doi: 10.1089/dia.2017.0259. Epub 2017 Oct 27. We sought to determine the real-life experiences of individuals traveling long distance (across five or more time-zones) with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Five hundred three members of the T1D Exchange online community ( www.myglu.org ) completed a 45-question survey about their travel experiences flying long distance. The cohort was stratified by duration of T1D and whether or not participants used continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy and/or a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). In the last 5 years, 71% of participants had flown long distance. When asked about their perceived "fear of flying," CSII users (with and without a CGM) reported their primary anxiety was "losing supplies," while non-CSII users described concerns over "unstable blood glucose (highs and lows)" (P < 0.05). In addition, 74% of participants reported more hypoglycemia and/or hyperglycemia while traveling overseas and 9% had avoided international travel altogether because of problems related to diabetes management. Furthermore, 22% of participants had run out of insulin at some point during a trip and 37% reported inadequate attention in current sources of information to the unpredictability of self-management needs while traveling. Especially problematic for individuals traveling with T1D are a lack of resources adequately addressing (1) protocols for emergencies while abroad, (2) how to navigate airport security, and (3) managing basal insulin rates when crossing time zones. A strong need exists for easily accessible, free resources Continue reading >>

Challenges Of Long-distance Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes

Challenges Of Long-distance Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes

Challenges of Long-Distance Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes Challenges of Long-Distance Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes Clinicians need access to better tools to personalize the advice they give to people with type 1 diabetes. Although long-distance air travel across multiple time zones presents many potential difficulties in general, insulin-treated individuals face numerous additional challenges related to this type of travel. They must adjust insulin dosage based on time zone, for example, and they may need to consider the effects of altitude on blood glucose levels.1 Despite these issues, there is a lack of adequate, easily accessible resources to guide patients in such planning. Noting the dearth of data on this topic, Pinsker et al explored the real-life experiences of adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who have traveled long distance (defined here as travel across 5 or more time zones).2 They recruited 503 members of the T1D Exchange online patient community, Glu , each of whom completed a 45-question online survey about their long-distance flying experiences. 71% of respondents had traveled long-distance by air in the last 5 years. Among those using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy, with or without a continuous glucose monitor , the primary travel-related fear was "losing supplies." Among noncontinuous subcutaneous insulin infusion users, "unstable blood glucose (highs and lows)" was cited as a main concern. Among those who had traveled overseas, more hypoglycemia and/or hyperglycemia was reported to have occurred during travel. Issues pertaining to diabetes management led 9% of respondents to avoid overseas travel altogether. 22% of participants had run out of insulin during a trip. 37% of participants indicated that available sources of informa Continue reading >>

Travel & Diabetes

Travel & Diabetes

People with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can travel all over the world – diabetes is no barrier. Make the right preparations and you should be able to minimise any potential problems. The diet for people with diabetes is the same healthy diet recommended for everyone so you should be able to choose items from the usual menu while away from home. If you are travelling alone, you may like to let the staff know when you check in as a precaution in case you become unwell during your stay. Things to check before you go Carry diabetes ID and a letter from your GP, which says you have diabetes and the medication you need to treat it if you are carrying insulin or an injectable medication. Take twice the quantity of medical supplies you would normally use for your diabetes. Find out where you can get supplies of insulin at your destination, in case of emergency. Contact your insulin manufacturer before the trip to see if your insulin is supplied in the country you are travelling to. It's also worth checking that it is sold under the same name. You can get your prescription sent to your destination by courier. Flights often cross time zones. If you treat your diabetes with medication or insulin, it’s important you check with your diabetes care team. If you need to make any changes to your regime be mindful that a hot or cold climate may affect how your insulin and blood glucose monitor work. Apply for the free European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) if you are travelling to a European Union member country – it will ensure that you have easy access to healthcare in that country. Apply for your card on theEHIC page on the NHS choices website, by calling 0845 605 0707, or fill in a pack at the Post Office. Beware of websites which offer to take care of the application for yo Continue reading >>

Travel Smart With Type 1 Diabetes | Everyday Health

Travel Smart With Type 1 Diabetes | Everyday Health

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. There's no need to stay home if you have type 1 diabetes. Use these diabetes management tips before you leave and while you're away for safe, enjoyable travel. Vacation should be a time to leave your cares behind, yet having type 1 diabetes may make traveling stressful. But that doesn't mean you have to stay home, wishing everyone else a nice trip. With a little preparation and flexibility, you can go ahead and pack your bags, too. Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes: The Basics Whether youre traveling by land, air, or sea, advanced planning is always a good idea with type 1 diabetes. Here's how to prepare for your trip: Bring a doctors note. Ask your doctor to spell out your medical need for insulin and the supplies required, says Toby Smithson, RDN, LDN, CDE, a certified diabetes educator, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. Make sure you have your doctors phone number in case you have a question or need to contact a pharmacy. If you wear an insulin pump or a continuous glucose meter, be prepared for Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents at the airport to inspect these devices. Keep your medication with you. Be sure to carry all medications and supplies in your purse or carry-on bag in case your checked bags get lost or are handled roughly. Stowing insul Continue reading >>

Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes

Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes

Is your mind spinning with details when just thinking about travel? How to get there? Where to stay? What will it cost? What are the food options? What activities or sights to see? What clothes to pack for the climate? Who will water the plants and take care of the pets? All of my diabetic supplies are packed all the time. Yes, I keep my bags packed and ready to go because really, who wants to worry about another thing when you have so many other details to coordinate before travel? I travel frequently, and often for long lengths of time. Due to this, I’ve developed a 3-tier packing system based on the amount of time I’ll be traveling. The System I’ve Developed A small eBags packing cube to carry 2-14 days worth of supplies A carry-on business shoulder bag for up to 3 months of travel A carry-on roller suitcase for all of my remaining diabetic supplies (This is what I use when traveling for more than 3 months and for international moves.) Plan Your Supplies When starting to plan, always account for double the supplies that you would normally use at home. For example, over 7 days at home, I would use 2-3 insulin pump infusion sets depending on when I last changed it. For 7 days of travel, I’d pack 4-6 infusion sets. If you might not need an item during your time of travel (for example, a Dexcom transmitter that should last for 3 months), pack a spare just in case. I use both an insulin pump and Dexcom CGM, so your necessary and preferred supplies may be different than mine. Here is what I pack for a 7-day trip: DEXCOM: Dexcom Transmitter (spare) Dexcom Sensors (2) Dexcom Receiver (if you use one) Charging cord for Dexcom receiver (and adapters if needed) Opsite Flexifix, precut to fit over Dexcom Transmitter (4) Skin Tac wipes (4) Uni-Solve wipes (4) PUMP: Pump I Continue reading >>

Travel

Travel

Whether for work or pleasure, travel can and should be fun and having diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t travel. With good planning, your trip can be safe, fun and hassle-free whether you’re going interstate or overseas. While traveling: Make sure you eat well, consider how different foods will affect you Make sure you check your blood glucose levels regularly For people with type 1 diabetes - carry the right lollies with you (overseas brands may not be as strong) If you are flying, prepare for long delays or misplaced baggage (just in case!) If traveling overseas, time zones and extreme climates may affect you and how you manage your diabetes, talk to your doctor or diabetes educator Below is information on planning your trip, travel insurance, airport regulation, what to ask your doctor, tips on what to pack and flying. Planning your travel itinerary & bookings (Three Months Prior) Plan travel itinerary and make bookings If you wear an electronic device to monitor blood glucose levels or infuse insulin, check with the airline to see if these devices can be operated in-flight Arrange travel insurance for health and belongings Check vaccination requirements When booking your flights, you may choose to tell the airline you have diabetes. This will be passed on to the cabin crew who are trained in meeting your needs during the flight. In general, ‘diabetic’ meals served in-flight can be quite bland and no longer necessary. However you may choose to order meals that are low in saturated fat and high in fibre and carbohydrate at the time you make your bookings. Be sure to make arrangements in advance so that you comply with Australian airline security regulations specifically for people with diabetes. The regulations are: You must carry all diabetes supplies includin Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes

6 Tips For Traveling With Type 1 Diabetes

6 Tips for Traveling with Type 1 Diabetes A globetrotter with Type 1 shares how to enjoy the journey, even when you forget your insulin in Kuala Lumpur. Im watching for my stop on a rickety train in rural Hungary, but there are no signs and I cant understand the announcements. This isnt the time to worry about my blood sugar levels. Ive had Type 1 diabetes for over 30 years, and it hasnt stopped me from doing anything or going anywhere. Ive traveled throughout Europe, Japan, Mexico, Southeast Asia, China, and the U.S. On all of my trips, taking care of my blood sugar levels is my first priority, but that doesnt get in the way of the adventure. From personal experience, here are 6 tips on rules of the road for traveling with Type 1: Recently in the small Czech town of Cesky Krumlov, I had a small sandwich and coffee at a little caf in the shadow of an ancient castle. My blood sugar was fine before the meal. Two hours later, though, I was over 300. How? It must have been the dense bread. From then on, I started upping my dosage when eating bread in Europe, and my readings improved. Even familiar foods may be prepared differently in foreign locales, so you can never be positive what will happen with your blood sugar. Check often, including every time you eat something new, even if you think you know what your reading is going to be. Throughout several weeks in Estonia and Latvia, I was consistently high. No matter what I did, I often was over 200. It was starting to get to me, but I didnt give up. By patiently experimenting with my Humalog doses, my readings eventually improved to an acceptable level. In times like these, its good to keep things in perspective. Uneven sugar levels happen to all people with diabetes, whether they are traveling or not. Wouldnt you rather ha Continue reading >>

Tackling Travel With Diabetes: Airport & Plane Food Secrets

Tackling Travel With Diabetes: Airport & Plane Food Secrets

Tackling Travel with Diabetes: Airport & Plane Food Secrets Adam, what do you eat when youre on a plane? My six go-to strategies from hundreds of flights and airports Q: Hi Adam, like you, I also travel a lot. What do you eat when youre on a plane for so many hours? I tend to go high as the plane food is not what people with diabetes need. What do you think? F.A. (Lisbon, Portugal) A: Thanks for this great question its one I think about a lot! I spend hundreds of hours every year in airports and on planes. But before I get into tactics, there are two ground rules I try to remember: 1. If Im not hungry, I DO NOT EAT. This is especially critical while traveling, since: A. Junk food is everywhere and continuously tempting in airports. There are so many opportunities to make unhelpful food choices, especially when I see food but am not actually hungry. B. Im more likely to be sleep deprived and stressed while traveling, which drive insulin resistance, sugar/carb cravings, and worse food choices. If I fall into such choices when Im not even hungry, high blood sugars are almost guaranteed. 2. I can avoid Diabetes Landmines with a pre-loaded plan of attack. How can I set up a Bright Spot choice instead? No matter the food environment I find myself in, I can usually change my default options by thinking ahead. Travel does bringa lot of uncertainty, but much of it is actually quite predictable I know what restaurants and snack options will be in my nearby airport, I know Ill be able to access my carry-on bag, etc. With those ground rules in mind, here are six tools I use to eat in airports and on planes! 1. I rely on nuts and seeds while traveling almonds, peanuts, pumpkin seeds (in theshell), sunflower seed (shelled kernels), etc. These are readily available in pretty much eve Continue reading >>

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