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Flu Shot Causes Diabetes

Flu Virus May Trigger Diabetes, Study Says

Flu Virus May Trigger Diabetes, Study Says

Flu Virus May Trigger Diabetes, Study Says Researchers have prompted another reason to worry about flu season. The influenza virus may trigger diabetes. But, if the hunch is true, it may also help doctors target and prevent diabetes. There are two common forms of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or when the cells ignore the insulin that the body creates. The second, less common form of diabetes is Type 1, which affects 5 percent of people with diabetes ,is when the body does not produce insulin at all. It is normally diagnosed during childhood or young adulthood. While people are born with a genetic predisposition for the disorder, an environmental factor triggers the onset of the lifelong condition - though researchers have remained uncertain about what exactly the environmental factor is. As a result, researchers from Italy infected turkeys with the flu , because infected birds normally have enlarged pancreas after developing the flu, even if the virus does not spread beyond their respiratory tract. After flu infection, many of the turkeys developed severe pancreatitis, or pancreas damage, and diabetes. Subsequent studies by the same researchers infected human pancreatic tissue with two common influenza viruses. In both cases, the flu virus grew very well, producing the type of chemicals that are, in turn, central to the autoimmune reactions that lead to type 1 diabetes.According to New Scientist, researchers theorize that immune cells bring infected cells to the fighter T-cells to help them learn to destroy the disease. But the T-cells become carried away with their job, learning to not just recognize the disease, but the insulin-producing cells that carry them. Normally, in humans, the flu virus r Continue reading >>

The Truth About Flu Shots

The Truth About Flu Shots

**Editors Note: This article is based on current recommendations and research from the CDC . We encourage everyone to consult their doctor whenmaking personal health decisions. I got my flu shot in a Target CVS this year. I went in to pick up my insulin from the pharmacy, and when the pharmacist asked if Id like to get a flu shot I agreed. Id been meaning to anyway. Within 2 minutes Id filled out the necessary paperwork and she gave me the injection. Unfortunately, she hit a vein when she took the needle out, blood was dripping down my arm right in the middle of a public area of Target. The pharmacist was embarrassed and worried that Id be upset, but with 15 years as a Type 1 diabetic under my belt, this felt like a pretty average day. I laughed, thanked her, and left with a $5 gift card. A win-win, because I know how important it is to get a flu shot as a T1D. No doubt, your healthcare professional has urged you to get a flu vaccine. In the United States, flu vaccines are recommended for everyone over 6 months old but if you have diabetes, getting vaccinated is especially important ( CDC ). Dr. Marina Basina, an endocrinologist at Stanford explains that If a person with diabetes gets the flu, it becomes much more difficult to manage blood sugars any infection will elevate blood sugars and increase variability in the readings and resistance to insulin. On the other hand, fevers, sweats and poor appetite may lead to low blood sugars, or ketone formation even in the setting of normal blood sugars. Furthermore, DKA is more frequent in the setting of flu even when blood sugars are not significantly elevated. Flu shots are a safe, inexpensive and effective way to lower your risk ofgetting sick. One study found that flu vaccination is associated with a 79% lower rate of hosp Continue reading >>

Did The Flu Shot Cause My Daughter's Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

Did The Flu Shot Cause My Daughter's Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Got questions about life with diabetes? So do we! That's why we offer our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1 peep W il Dubois , a diabetes author with many years' experience as an educator in a New Mexico clinic. This week, Wil is taking on one of those questions about whether vaccines -- the flu shot specifically -- might have led to diabetes. Well, we guess in this day and age of anti-vaccine scares, it's worth addressing this particularly long question head-on. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Gerry, D-mom from California, writes: My9-year-old daughter Ruby has been newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Thisdiagnosis has come completely out of the blue to us. We are a healthy family, one that doesnt eat junk food or ready meals, doesn't drink lots of sugary drinks,and there is no family history on either of the parents sides. We dont takeunnecessary medications, preferring a more holistic approach. Our consultant told us that the medicalprofession doesnt really know why T1 can suddenly start in juveniles, exceptto say that they think it is virus-related. I have a suspicion, though, whichis shared by my ex-husband.My daughters school was taking part in aprogram of vaccinating children under 11 against the flu virus toward the endof last year in November, and my daughter was given the fluvaccine via a nose spray. She didnt immediately appear to have a cold ortemperature but then shortly after began to complain of the occasional headacheor tummy ache. In the new year she had an increasedthirst and was weeing a lot more than usual, and saying she had a sore Continue reading >>

The Root Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes Could Be A Common Childhood Viral Infection

The Root Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes Could Be A Common Childhood Viral Infection

A young child becomes very thirsty very often and seems tired all the time. A visit to the pediatrician determines she has type 1 diabetes. The onset of type 1 diabetes may seem sudden, and it can be, but the disease may actually have been triggered by common childhood viruses years earlier. Type 1 diabetes—also called diabetes mellitus—was previously called juvenile-onset diabetes because most people affected with this disease are diagnosed as children and young adults. It isn't the most common form of diabetes and only 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. That doesn't make it any less serious—in fact, it can be a life-threatening disease. When we eat something, our body converts carbohydrates and starches in the food into sugar (glucose), which is then processed by our bodies to either be used or stored for later. People with type 1 diabetes have trouble keeping their blood sugar level even: It spikes when they eat something and goes very low if they don't. That's because their pancreas doesn't make insulin, the hormone that in a healthy human moves glucose from the blood into cells where it can be used for energy, keeping it from spiking after eating. Type 1 diabetics must constantly monitor their blood sugar and take insulin to keep their levels within a normal range to keep this process running. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, a disease where the body forms antibodies to itself and attacks parts of its own body. In this case, antibodies are formed to the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Experts believe type 1 diabetes may be caused by a genetic risk factors and environmental factors, including viruses. A viral link to type 1 diabetes is one of the findings in a new study led by Hanna Honkanen and Heikki Hyöty in th Continue reading >>

Flu And People With Diabetes

Flu And People With Diabetes

People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control your blood sugar. The illness might raise your sugar but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines for people with diabetes. Vaccination is the Best Protection against Flu CDC recommends that all people who are 6 months and older get a flu vaccine. It is especially important for people with diabetes to get a flu vaccine. Flu shots are approved for use in people with diabetes and other health conditions. The flu shot has a long, established safety record in people with diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia because of the flu, so being up to date with pneumococcal vaccination is also recommended. Pneumococcal vaccination should be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and throw the tissue away after using it; Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing; Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth (germs are spread that way); and Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care. If you are sick with flu-like symptoms you should sta Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

When public health officials fret about the soaring incidence of diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide, they are generally referring to type 2 diabetes. About 90 percent of the nearly 350 million people around the world who have diabetes suffer from the type 2 form of the illness, which mostly starts causing problems in the 40s and 50s and is tied to the stress that extra pounds place on the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose. About 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, and another million have type 1 diabetes, which typically strikes in childhood and can be controlled only with daily doses of insulin. For reasons that are completely mysterious, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing throughout the globe at rates that range from 3 to 5 percent a year. Although the second trend is less well publicized, it is still deeply troubling, because this form of the illness has the potential to disable or kill people so much earlier in their lives. No one knows exactly why type 1 diabetes is rising. Solving that mystery—and, if possible, reducing or reversing the trend—has become an urgent problem for public health researchers everywhere. So far they feel they have only one solid clue. “Increases such as the ones that have been reported cannot be explained by a change in genes in such a short period,” says Giuseppina Imperatore, who leads a team of epidemiologists in the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “So environmental factors are probably major players in this increase.” A Challenge of Counting Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the same underlying defect—an inability to deploy insulin in a manner that keeps blood sugar from rising too high—but they arise out of almos Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / flu shot key for people with diabetes article Want More News? Sign Up for MedicineNet Newsletters! SUNDAY, Oct. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people -- particularly those with diabetes -- to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for Continue reading >>

Why You Should Get A Flu Shot

Why You Should Get A Flu Shot

As fall comes around I hear people debating, “Should I get the flu shot?”, “Should I vaccinate my kids?”. I’m always surprised to hear just how hesitant people are to vaccinate. The flu is a highly infectious and serious viral respiratory infection. Many viruses can give you the sniffles, but allow you to continue working or going to school. The flu, however, actually knocks you out, and flu symptoms can be quite severe and prolonged. In addition, bacterial infections (superinfections) can occur on top of the flu infection– those are situations which can truly overwhelm the lungs. Such a situation is especially dangerous for the elderly and the very young. It can even cause death. People’s main concern with the influenza vaccine tends to be that the injection will actually give them the flu. This is not true. While the vaccine can cause soreness or redness at the site of the shot, pains in the joints, and even mild fever, it is nothing like the flu itself. A good excuse not to get vaccinated is if you have an egg allergy, in which case the vaccine is contraindicated, since the vaccine is developed in eggs. Many people don’t get the flu vaccine, and they are okay. People with diabetes, however, shouldn’t take a chance. Most people with diabetes are not aware that for them, the flu can pose a much bigger threat than it does for people without diabetes. When blood sugar levels are elevated, especially above 200mg/dL, the immune cells do not work as efficiently and therefore patients with diabetes may have abnormalities in immune function. Studies have shown that diabetics are sick longer with the flu, have a higher chance of ending up in the hospital, and even an increased risk of death. This is particularly true for patients who have diabetes complicatio Continue reading >>

Does The Flu Shot Affect Blood Sugar?

Does The Flu Shot Affect Blood Sugar?

While most physicians will tell you that your blood glucose will not be impacted by a flu shot, anecdotally there are reports of increased blood sugar levels immediately post- injection. Does this mean you shouldn’t get a flu shot? Absolutely not. Your risk from contracting the flu is far greater than a brief period of elevated blood glucose. The Flu Shot Doctors say that diabetics should not take the nasal form of the flu vaccination, only the injection. The vaccine is made of killed flu viruses, and cannot give you the flu. The vaccine is between 70% and 90% effective, and takes about two weeks to provide full immunity. It is generally available sometime during September, and physicians urge diabetics to get it as early as possible so they have complete immunity when the season begins. Some people report higher-than-normal blood glucose readings immediately after their vaccination and for a week or two. Generally, these levels are not high enough to signify an emergency situation, i.e. hyperglycemia and all of its ramifications. There is no real explanation for this increase, other than a possible small bump to the metabolism as the body processes the vaccine. Being aware of the possibility, and adjusting insulin and diet to address the higher readings should be sufficient. If after a couple of weeks glucose levels don’t return to normal, consult your physician. Why Getting a Flu Shot is Critical for Diabetics According to the CDC, diabetics are three times more likely to be hospitalized for the flu and the complications it causes than the rest of the population. Diabetes weakens the immune system, making diabetics more susceptible to the flu, and more likely to develop complications. Doctors not only urge diabetics to get vaccinated, but also strongly recommend t Continue reading >>

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

In the fall of 1997, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed that the number of Americans living with diabetes has skyrocketed in the past 40 years with a record sixfold increase in this chronic disease since 1958. It is estimated that nearly 16 million Americans are suffering with diabetes and 5 million more may have it but not know it. Over the past four decades, intensive national mass vaccination campaigns have dramatically increased vaccination rates among American children who now are getting 34 doses of 10 different viral and bacterial vaccines before they enter kindergarten. Recent published data in the medical literature suggest increasing numbers of childhood vaccines may be playing a role in the big jump in the number of cases of juvenile diabetes. The most frequent kind of diabetes is diabetes mellitus, a chronic degenerative disease caused when the pancreas either fails to produce a protein hormone called insulin or the body's cells are resistant to the action of insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot process and use glucose, a blood sugar which is a chief source of energy for living organisms and is found in certain foods like fruit. If the body's cells have become resistant to insulin, glucose cannot be moved from the blood to cells in order to be transformed into energy. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I, called insulin-dependent juvenile diabetes, and Type II, called adult-onset diabetes. Type I Diabetes - Type I diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), occurs mostly in children and young adults. Five to 10 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes are Type I diabetics. In Type I diabetes, the body cannot produce insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the bloodstream and be secreted from the body in the Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

(HealthDay)—With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people—particularly those with diabetes—to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. Immune system boost. As people age, their immune system weakens. The flu can tax Continue reading >>

Flu Virus May Trigger Diabetes

Flu Virus May Trigger Diabetes

Italian researchers have discovered that the flu virus may trigger the onset of type 1 diabetes. Sign Up for Our Healthy Living Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2012 The flu virus may do more than just make you sick with the flu, say Italian researchers. It could also trigger diabetes. Type 1 diabetes , once known as juvenile diabetes, affects as many as 3 million Americans, most of them diagnosed as children. Type 1 diabetes develops when the bodys immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells found in the pancreas. The condition is genetic, but an environmental trigger is also necessary for it to appear. Researchers have suspected the flu virus might provide this trigger since the 1970s, because type 1 diabetes often sets in after an infection. Study author Ilaria Capua and her team from the World Organization for Animal Health infected turkeys with the flu to test their theory that it could trigger diabetes. They conducted the study on turkeys because they knew birds with the flu often have an inflamed pancreas, according to New Scientist . They found that many of the turkeys infected with flu virus developed severe pancreatic damage, as well as diabetes. The researchers then infected human pancreatic tissue with two common flu viruses and found that both viruses grew well in the tissue. The flu virus in the pancreatic cells triggered production of inflammatory chemicals that are central to the autoimmune reactions that lead to type 1 diabetes. Normally, in humans, the virus attacks the lungs and gut, but not typically the pancreas. But it can sometimes get into the blood and travel to the pancreas , researchers said. Capua is now testing th Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccines Can Cause Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Research Confirms

Childhood Vaccines Can Cause Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Research Confirms

Childhood vaccines can cause diabetes and metabolic syndrome, research confirms Sunday, October 13, 2013 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer (NaturalNews) Comprehensive research compiled by expert immunologist Dr. J. "Bart" Classen has uncovered the disturbing fact that childhood vaccines are a common cause of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as the barrage of chronic illness symptoms typically associated with metabolic syndrome. Because they tend to overstimulate the immune system, vaccines have the potential to either inhibit the proper production of insulin, resulting in the development of type 1 diabetes, or spur the production of too much insulin, resulting in the development of type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, as many people are already aware, is an autoimmune condition whereby the body attacks the pancreas and destroys the pancreatic cells responsible for producing insulin, a detrimental situation in which the body must be artificially injected with insulin. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is actually a chronic inflammatory condition marked by the pancreas producing too much insulin, and the body being unable to properly absorb it. According to Dr. Classen, most of the people who develop type 2 diabetes, although often overweight or obese, are not typically responsible for triggering the onset of this potentially deadly condition. Particularly in children, there is clearly another factor involved in the development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and one that available science on the subject seems to confirm is related to childhood vaccines. "Not only are vaccines causing an epidemic of autoimmunity including type 1 diabetes, but they are causing an epidemic of metabolic syndrome as the immune system acts to suppress the inflammation and autoimmun Continue reading >>

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Having type 1 or type 2 diabetes puts you at increased risk of illness because elevated blood sugar weakens the immune system. Getting an annual flu shot is the best way to protect yourself. Fall is here, and that means that along with pumpkins and hay rides, it’s influenza (flu) season—which can last until May. For those with diabetes, flu isn’t just a drag: It can result in hospitalization, and occasionally even death. Fortunately, a vaccine can slash your risk of the illness by an estimated 40-60%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The flu shot also lowers your chances of hospitalization, which is most common in flu patients with chronic conditions like diabetes. The vaccine can also “prevent major respiratory infections during the flu season,” says Kavita Seetharaman, MD, staff physician at Joslin Diabetes Center, a Boston-based non-profit affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Why Is the Flu So Dangerous for People with Diabetes? “As with any other infection, the flu virus can cause inflammation, congestion, and mucus production in the respiratory tract,” as well as cough, fever, and even breathing difficulties, Dr. Seetharaman says. But for diabetes patients, there’s another risk. “When patients with diabetes are not feeling well,” due to illness, infection, or injury, “they can become more insulin resistant. Blood sugar rises [even if patients aren’t eating], and ketones can develop,” she explains. Ketones are chemicals that are produced when there’s not enough glucose (sugar) to fuel the metabolism; the presence of ketones (which can be detected with over-the-counter test strips) indicate that the body is using fat for energy. Patients with diabetes can accumulate ketones in the blood, which can make Continue reading >>

Elevated Bg From Flu Shot?

Elevated Bg From Flu Shot?

I had been struggling with my BG for several weeks. I was so frustrated. Well I kept adjusting my basal rates and now have everything back to where they should be. Finally!!! Well now I'm puzzled. I changed my infusion set this morning. I went to the pharmacy to pick up more strips and my insulin. While there I had my flu shot. It wasn't planned. But now all afternoon my BG won't come below 130 even with corrections. Has anyone noticed that the flu shot will cause the rise that is very stubborn to come down? My arm is a little sore and I have to admit I do have the body aches. I'm thinking the elevation could be from the shot. But it makes me wonder if the infusion set maybe isn't in a "happy" place. Sorry you had probs with it Debbie. I had no increase in bg last year, but I know the vaccine is different each year, so who knows. I haven't had this year's yet, I had planned to go Saturday, but kinda got side-tracked and ended up going to buy a car instead I'll go this coming Saturday, and will keep a close check on bg. Sounds like you were coming down with something anyway, hope you feel better soon. Last edited by Mands; 9/28/09 at 12:02 AM. Reason: typos A1c December 06 6.3 March 06 6.2 June 07 5.7 Dec 07 5.8 June 08 5.6 Nov. 08 5.7 Jan 09 5.8 May 09 5.6 Aug 09 5.4 Feb 10 6.0 Sept 10 6.5 Feb 11 7.1 June 11 5.7 Nov 11 5.9 (41) Feb 12 6.1 (43) Aug 12 6.4 (46) Dec 12 5.8 (40.4) June 13 5.9 (41) January 14 6.1 (43) July 14 6.4 (46) Feb. 15 5.8 (40) Sept 15 6.8 (52) January 16 7.6% (60) April 16 7.0% (53) July 16 5.9% (41) Oct. 16 5.4% (36) I don't think I was coming down with anything. I felt fine prior to the flu shot. Last year was actually the first year I had no symptoms after getting the shot. I always get a sore arm, run a low grade fever and get the typical flu li Continue reading >>

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