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Florida Department Of Health Diabetes

Diabetes | Florida Department Of Health

Diabetes | Florida Department Of Health

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose, which your body uses for energy. Your blood takes the glucose to the cells throughout your body. Your blood always has some glucose in it. But too much glucose in the blood is not good for your health. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (sugar) is too high. The glucose from food needs insulin to get into the body's cells. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood. If your body does not make enough insulin or the insulin does not work right, the glucose can't get into the cells, so it stays in the blood. This makes your blood glucose level high, causing you to have diabetes. New: Diabetes Advisory Council Legislative Report The Diabetes Advisory Council, in conjunction with the Department of Health, the Agency for Health Care Administration, and the Department of Management Services, has submitted its first biennial report on diabetes to the Governor, Speaker of the House, and President of the Senate. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What is Prediabetes? Prediabetes means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Prediabetes is a serious health condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. 86 million American adults have prediabetes. Nine out of 10 people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. If you have prediabetes, you are 5 to15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people with normal blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. The vast majority of people with prediabetes do not know they have the condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 of every 3 U.S. adults has prediabetes and half of all Americans aged 65 years and older have prediabetes. If you have any of the following risk factors, you are more likely to develop prediabetes: 45 years of age or older Overweight Have a parent, sister, or brother with diabetes Family background is African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander Developed diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes), or gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more Physically active less than 3 times a week It is important to find out early if you have prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, because early treatment can prevent serious problems that diabetes can cause, such as loss of eyesight or kidney damage. If you have two or more of the risk factors above, you should consider getting a blood test from a health care provider for prediabetes and diabetes. If your test results indicate you have prediabetes you should enroll in an evidence-based lifestyle program to lower your chances of getting type 2 diabetes. Studies show that people with prediabetes can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program Accreditations And Disclosures

Diabetes Prevention Program Accreditations And Disclosures

Diabetes Prevention Program Accreditations And Disclosures Estimated Time to Finish: 3:00 hours (2.75 hours for modules; 15 minutes for testing) Prediabetes is a health condition characterized by blood glucose levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Prediabetes is treatable, but only about 10 percent of people who have it are aware that they do. Left untreated up to one-third of people with prediabetes will progress to diabetes within five years. [i] This online, three video module activity is designed to provide primary care providers with the knowledge and skills to: Recognize the pathophysiology, the incidence and implications of prediabetes Identify the indicators that prediabetes has transitioned to diabetes Initiate treatment to prevent the damage to the body that occurs during prediabetes Refer prediabetic patients to community resources to help them with preventive lifestyle changes Primary care team members, including Physicians, ARNPs, PAs, Nurses, Registered Dietitians, Pharmacists, Licensed Social Work and Mental Health Professionals, and others who support and treat patients at risk of diabetes. As a result of participating in this activity, the learner should be able to: Talk with prediabetes patients about lifestyle changes that can impact their disease state Refer prediabetes patients to in-person or online education programs Describe the steps to be used to effectively encourage larger institutions to implement a prediabetes education program All learning objectives apply to all professions in the target audience Nicole Johnson, DrPH, MPH, MA Activity Director If you plan to claim credit please take the time to scan through the doc Continue reading >>

Fdoh Diabetes Project

Fdoh Diabetes Project

Florida 211 Network Database on Diabetes Education and Prevention Programs Project with the Florida Department of Health The purpose of this project is for the Florida Alliance of Information and Referral Services (FLAIRS) to ensure all members of the Florida 211 Network have the most current information on diabetes self-management education (DSME) programs and Centers for Disease Control Recognized Lifestyle Change Programs (LCP) in their data bases. This project will assure that Floridians with or at high risk for chronic diseases and their health care providers have access to information about quality community resources to best manage their conditions. The Department supplies a list of programs by county and educational information that is put on the 211 websites during February for heart disease and during April for diabetes awareness. The Florida 211 Network updates this program information and responds to callers requesting information on diabetes self-management education programs and CDC recognized lifestyle change programs. Referrals are then offered to these programs. Continue reading >>

Florida Board Of Nursing Healthiest Weight Florida Work To Raise Awareness And Prevent Prediabetes - Licensing, Renewals & Information

Florida Board Of Nursing Healthiest Weight Florida Work To Raise Awareness And Prevent Prediabetes - Licensing, Renewals & Information

Healthiest Weight Florida Work to Raise Awareness and Prevent Prediabetes Posted in Latest News on February 9, 2015. The Florida Department of Health joins the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in their campaign to Prevent Diabetes STAT :Screen,Test, ActTodayby raising awareness about the risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes and encouraging all Floridians to take action to lower their risk. According to the CDC, an estimated 29.1 million people of the U.S. population have diabetes. An even larger amount however has prediabetes. Roughly 86 million American adults have prediabetes and nine out of ten people with prediabetes dont know they have it. Prediabetes means a persons blood glucose level is higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Those with prediabetes are at an increased risk for developing serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease. The sooner people find out they have prediabetes and take action, the better their chances of preventing type 2 diabetes. Studies show people with prediabetes can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of their weight by making lasting lifestyle changes to improve nutrition and increase physical activity to 150 minutes each week. Healthiest Weight Floridaan initiative of the Florida Department of Healthis currently working across the state to increase opportunities for physical activity and access to healthy foods and promote health in worksites and schools. The Florida Department of Health also provides several Diabetes Prevention Lifestyle Change (DPLC) programs through the county offices. The DPLCP is a 16-week program for people with prediabetes. Trained lifestyle coaches assist part Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Education

Diabetes Self Management Education

Diabetes Self Management Education The best way to manage your diabetes is to take a diabetes self-management education (DSME) class. In Florida, DSME is covered by health insurance. Programs provided as a health benefit must meet national standards. DSME is NOT a 24-hour nurse hotline or a brochure. It is tailored to individual needs, but can be provided in a group setting. Group DSME classes provide a social networking component that increases success. DSME can be provided in person or via telehealth. Telehealth is the use of technology to deliver health information. How do you know you are receiving quality DSME? The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) authorizes two organizations, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) to certify DSME programs as meeting the national standards. The designation of ADA recognition or AADE accreditation assures participants in these DSME programs that they are receiving quality services. DSME is covered by insurance. If you have any difficulty with insurance coverage of diabetes self-management education, contact the Office of Insurance Regulation Consumer Hotline at 1-877-693-5236. Find an ADA-recognized DSME program near you: Find an AADE-accredited DSME program near you: Telehealth programs – Florida locations Currently, there are no locations in Florida which offer accredited or recognized DSME via telehealth. Programs will be listed here as they become available. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Services | Florida Department Of Health In Bay

Diabetes Services | Florida Department Of Health In Bay

Marsha Sumner, BSN, RN, Senior Community Health Nurse Supervisor Jo Colville, BSN, MA, CDE, LNC, Diabetes Services Consultant & Coordinator Deanna Howard-Gonzalez, MBA, RD,LD/N, CDE If you have concerns, questions or suggestions about the services offered through the Diabetes Services Program, please contact the program manager at 850-252-9652. We welcome your feedback and will utilize it for continuing improvement of service delivery. Healthy Bay Division is committed to excellence in chronic disease prevention and health promotion through health education. Development of health management strategies integrated with education are integral components toward decreasing risk for development of chronic disease as well as management of chronic disease for those who are already diagnosed. The Diabetes Services Program seeks to address the need for educating Bay County residents and helping them manage their health through the offering of diabetes prevention and self-management education. Current offerings include: National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention led National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) is an evidence-based lifestyle change program for preventing Type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight which reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with pre-diabetes. It teaches participants strategies for incorporating physical activity into daily life and eating healthy. Participants meet in a group setting to receive a 1-year lifestyle change program that includes 16 weekly core sessions and 6 monthly follow-up sessions with a trained Lifestyle Coach. Our program is listed in CDCs Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advisory Council

Diabetes Advisory Council

Welcome to the Florida Diabetes Advisory Council Website The Diabetes Advisory Council is a statutorily mandated ( 385.203, F.S. ) group that was created to guide a statewide comprehensive approach to diabetes prevention, diagnosis, education, care, treatment, impact, and costs. The Diabetes Advisory Council serves as the advisory unit to the Department of Health, other governmental agencies, professional and other organizations, and the general public. The council provides statewide leadership to continuously improve the lives of Floridians with diabetes and reduce the burden of diabetes. The Diabetes Advisory Council makes specific recommendations to the State Surgeon General regarding the public health aspects of the prevention and control of diabetes. The Diabetes Advisory Council, in conjunction with the Department of Health, the Agency for Health Care Administration, and the Department of Management Services, has submitted its first biennial report on diabetes to the Governor, Speaker of the House, and President of the Senate. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program

Diabetes Prevention Program

The National Diabetes Prevention and Lifestyle Change Program (NDPP), which is based on research lead by the National Institutes of Health and supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC), helps prevent by type 2 diabetes by 58% when participants lose 5% to 7 % of their body weight (10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person). To qualify for the program, a person must be overweight and at risk of developing diabetes. Many factors increase your risk for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes: Having a family background of African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American-Indian,Asian-American, or Pacific-Islander. Having had diabetes while being pregnant (gestational diabetes), or having given birthto a baby weighing 9 pounds or more. Being physically active less than three times a week. NDPP spans one year and participants meet as a group with a trained lifestyle coach for 1 hour once a week for 16 weeks (4 months) and then once a month for 8 months. Participants learn how to make healthy lifestyle changes that can help prevent or delay their development of type 2 diabetes, including choosing healthier foods, losing weight, being more physically active and managing stress. The group setting provides a supportive environment with people who are facing similar challenges. *In 2014, the Florida Department of Health in Hillsborough County achieved full recognition from the CDC, which means we have demonstrated effectiveness by achieving all of the requirements described in the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program Standards. We are only the 4th entity in the U.S. to achieve this, the first health department, and we remain the only group in Florida fully recognized. New classes are starting regularly. If you are interested or would like our brochure or get more inform Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program (ndpp)

National Diabetes Prevention Program (ndpp)

National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) Home Programs and Services Wellness Programs National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) Florida Department of Health in Lake County Florida Department of Health in Lake County The National Diabetes Prevention Program is a 12 month program that consist of 16 weekly one hour core sessions followed by 6 monthly followup sessions that provide tools to: Pre-diabetes is when your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes. You may be at risk for Type 2 Diabetes if you: Are physically active fewer than 3 times per week Had gestational diabetes or gave birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds. See your doctor to get your blood sugar tested today! This program is offered free of charge at various locations in Lake County. For more information or to register for a class, call 3525896424 Option 3 or email [email protected] 1 out of 3 kids are now considered overweight or obese. 65% of adults in Florida are at an unhealthy weight. Continue reading >>

Area Agency On Aging For North Florida

Area Agency On Aging For North Florida

Search using Service when you know one or more of the words in a service terms. For example, searching with the words rent and assistance will help you find the service term rent payment assistance. Search using Agency/Program Name when you know one or more of the words in a service provider name or program name. For example, search with the words red and cross to find American Red Cross locations and see what services are offered. If you dont find any matching results, change the drop down list from Any Word to Partial Word. This is the least restrictive search. Finding too much on the results list? If there are too many results matching the word you used for searching, try the following to see fewer matches: Use more words for searching. For example, search with the three words bill payment assistance instead of just the word assistance. Another example is to search with the words abuse counseling or abuse prevention instead of just abuse. Change the drop down list from Any Word to All Words or Exact Phrase. This is the most restrictive search. If you limited your search by ZIP Code or town, delete the limits. Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Prevention Program Offered In Hillsborough County

Free Diabetes Prevention Program Offered In Hillsborough County

Free diabetes prevention program offered in Hillsborough County HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, Fla. The Florida Department of Health in Hillsborough County wants to help you reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, so they're offering a free program for certain residents. Participants will work with trained lifestyle coaches to form healthy eating habits and exercise routines. The first class will begin 10 a.m. on May 24, at the DOH-Hillsborough Floyd Kelton Clinic, located at 4704-B W Montgomery Ave in Tampa. A Spanish-only class begins 2 p.m. on June 13, at the WellCare Health Plans Center, located at 8328 N Florida Ave in Tampa. The first round is limited to just 15 participants, and more rounds will be offered based on demand. To qualify for the program, a person must be overweight and at risk of developing diabetes. Many factors increase the risk for prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes including: Having a family member with diabetes. Having a family background of African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American-Indian, Asian-American, or Pacific-Islander. Having had diabetes while being pregnant (gestational diabetes), or having given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more. Being physically active less than three times a week. Residents who are interested in the diabetes prevention program should call (813) 907-8015 ext. 7111 or email [email protected] . Copyright 2018 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is commonly diagnosed in children and young adults, but it's a lifelong condition. If you have this type of diabetes, your body does not make insulin, so you must take insulin every day. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin pump, making healthy food choices, getting regular physical activity, taking aspirin daily (for many people), and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation provides resources for people with type 1 diabetes, care givers, and health care providers. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes — about 9 out of 10 people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. You can get type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. Type 2 diabetes was previously called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions, due to an increased number of older Americans, and a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. In type 2 diabetes, your body makes insulin, but the insulin can't do its job, so glucose is not getting into the cells. Treatment includes taking medicine, making healthy food choices, getting regular physical activity, taking aspirin daily (for many people), and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body generally produces less and less insulin over time. This means that you may need to increase your medications or start using insulin in order to keep your diabetes in good control. Gestational Diabetes Gestational (jess-TAY-shun-ul) diabetes occurs during pregnancy. This type of diabetes occurs i Continue reading >>

As Part Of Diabetes Alert Day, Florida Health Officials Encourage Public To Learn About Risks

As Part Of Diabetes Alert Day, Florida Health Officials Encourage Public To Learn About Risks

As Part Of Diabetes Alert Day, Florida Health Officials Encourage Public To Learn About Risks Tuesday is Diabetes Alert Day, and Florida health officials are encouraging the public to learn about their risk for the disease. Jamie Forrest with the Florida Department of Health says there are a different types of diabetes for people to be aware ofType 2 being the most common. Type 1 diabetes is something that usually develops early in childhood and its where the body is unable to produce insulin to manage blood glucose or blood sugar levels, said she said. Type 2 diabetes is something that develops later in life often times, although weve seen more cases starting in youth, and its preventable and controllable. She says people over the age of 45 are at a higher risk. The risk of diabetes does increase with age, Forrest added. Other risks include being at an unhealthy weight, having a family history of diabetes, and not being physically active. Forrest says that risk can be lowered by just staying active and maintaining a healthy diet. For more information, visit healthiestweightflorida.com or DoIHavePrediabetes.org . For more news updates, follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner . Continue reading >>

About The Diabetes Prevention Program In Florida

About The Diabetes Prevention Program In Florida

1,090,356 adults have prediabetes in Florida. Without intervention, 15% to 30% will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Lose 5% to 7% of your body weight; get 150 minutes of physical activity a week. Drop risk for type 2 diabetes by 58%. Florida has a serious problem with diabetes.7.1% of the population has prediabetes in Florida. This includes 9.63% of Floridians age 65+, 7.9% of Floridians age 45-64 and 4.9% of the population age 18-44. However, this only includes people who reported being clinically diagnosed with prediabetes; many more people have this serious condition without knowing about it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates one in three adults has prediabetes. Prediabetes is the state of your body before you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. It means your blood sugars are running a little high, your body is having trouble metabolizing what you eat, and you are likely going to develop full-fledged type 2 diabetes if you dont do something about it. Guess what? You can do something about it. The State of Diabetes in the State of Florida Diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death in Florida In 2013 there were 5,209 deaths from diabetes In 2012 there were 565,117 hospitalizations from diabetes There are approximately 1,708,447 adults in Florida (11.2%) with diabetes DPP in Florida is a 1-year program (including meetings about once per week in the first 16 weeks followed by monthly support meetings) for people with prediabetes that moves proven research into communities. In this program, trained lifestyle coaches assist participants in reducing diabetes risk by losing 5 -7% of their body weight and increasing their physical activity. The goal of this program is to improve quality of life. The program was developed specifically to p Continue reading >>

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