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Flaxseed Oil And Diabetes

Oil Changes: The Final Chapter

Oil Changes: The Final Chapter

Over the last two weeks (in “Oil Changes: Part 1” and “Part 2”) we’ve explored several different kinds of edible oils and hopefully expanded your horizons a little. I’m going to wrap things up on oils this week with a look at two other oils that you may or may not be familiar with. Let’s start off with flaxseed oil. Where does this oil come from? The flax plant, of course. Flax is an ancient plant, dating back to the Stone Age. Flax fibers are used to make paper and fabric. Artists use linseed oil, which is derived from flaxseed, in oil paint. You may have heard or read a lot about flaxseed and its health benefits. Flaxseed oil is rich in an essential fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA for short. ALA has two other cousins, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These three fatty acids are omega-3 fatty acids, which you may know better as fish oils (although ALA isn’t found in fish). Omega-3 fatty acids have heart-health benefits, as they have been shown to help lower triglyceride levels, lower blood pressure, prevent irregular heartbeats, and reduce the risk of heart attack. In addition, they can also help reduce inflammation in the body and therefore help improve symptoms of certain inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Omega-3 fatty acids play an essential role in the behavioral and cognitive development of infants and children, too. Unlike omega-3’s, omega-6 fatty acids (found in most vegetable oils) may actually promote inflammation in the body. Therefore, it’s important to get the right balance of omega-3’s and omega-6’s. Nutrition experts recommend we aim for 2–4 times more omega-6’s than omega-3’s. The problem is that the typical American diet contains mor Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Adding Flaxseed To Type 2 Diabetic Patients Regimen

Effectiveness Of Adding Flaxseed To Type 2 Diabetic Patients Regimen

Received date: April 29, 2017; Accepted date: May 24, 2017; Published date: May 31, 2017 Citation: Tharwat S, Shaheen D, El-Megeid AA, Salam R, Rashed L, et al. (2017) Effectiveness of Adding Flaxseed to Type 2 Diabetic PatientsRegimen. Endocrinol Metab Syndr 6:267. doi:10.4172/2161-1017.1000267 Copyright: 2017 Tharwat S, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background and Aims: Flaxseed is a promising alternative reducing the risk of diseases associated with obesity. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supplemented bakery with flaxseed or flaxseed oil on type 2 diabetic patients Materials and Methods: Ninety type 2 diabetic on oral hypoglycemic (body weight, fasting, post prandial blood glucose, cholesterol , LDL, HDL, Triglycerides, VLDL and leptin) were recorded at base line, and after twelve weeks. Participants divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (control): Consists of 30 patients on regimen diet with type 2 diabetes who received regimen diet 1350 kcal. Group 2: Consists of 30 patients with type 2 diabetes and following regimen diet same as group (1) plus a dose of flaxseed oil bakery regimen diet for twelve weeks. Group (3): Consists of 30 subjects with type 2 diabetes on regimen diet the same as group (1) plus supplementation with flaxseed bakery product for twelve weeks. Results: After twelve weeks significant changes in group 2 and 3 Versus control in BMI (0.05, 0.03) fasting (p<0.001), post prandial glucose (0.03, 0.02, 0.001), HA1c (0.02, 0.01), cholesterol (0.024, <0.001, 0.01), triglycerides (<0.001), LDL (0.05, 0.001, 0.01), VLDL (<0.001) Continue reading >>

Flaxseed Oil And Diabetes: A Systemic Review

Flaxseed Oil And Diabetes: A Systemic Review

Abstract Preventing the occurrence of diabetes with nutritional interventions is a therapeutic strategy that may warrant greater research attention. Recent studies suggest that for the vegetarians other than the fish oil adding flaxseed oil to the diet may decrease insulin resistance in diabetics and pre-diabetics and help in reducing the risk of developing type 2 as well as type 1 diabetes. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are an essential source of energy found in animal and vegetable fats and oils. The general consensus is that eating the right proportion of omega-3 and omega-6 reduces inflammation in the body, the association between omega-3 Fatty Acids (FAs), type 1 and type 2 diabetes is not fully understood yet. Studies in the past suggest that omega-3 and omega-6 FA may affect the development of diabetes by modulation of insulin sensitivity in phospholipids membranes. Evidence suggests omega-6 FAs are generally protective for diabetes risk, whereas the evidence for omega-3 FAs is mixed. Based on the results of clinical trials, epidemiological investigations and experimental studies, ingestion of flaxseed oil has been suggested to have a positive impact on diabetics as well as pre diabetics. The purpose of the present review is to identify the protective effects of flaxseed oil and Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA) on diabetes. Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free Continue reading >>

High Dose Flaxseed Oil Supplementation May Affect Fasting Blood Serum Glucosemanagement In Human Type 2 Diabetics.

High Dose Flaxseed Oil Supplementation May Affect Fasting Blood Serum Glucosemanagement In Human Type 2 Diabetics.

High dose flaxseed oil supplementation may affect fasting blood serum glucosemanagement in human type 2 diabetics. Barre DE(1), Mizier-Barre KA, Griscti O, Hafez K. (1)Department of Health Studies, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. [email protected] Type 2 diabetes is characterized partially by elevated fasting blood serumglucose and insulin concentrations and the percentage of hemoglobin as HbA1c. It was hypothesized that each of blood glucose and its co-factors insulin and HbA1c and would show a more favorable profile as the result of flaxseed oilsupplementation. Patients were recruited at random from a population poolresponding to a recruitment advertisement in the local newspaper and 2 areaphysicians. Completing the trial were 10 flaxseed oil males, 8 flaxseed oilfemales, 8 safflower (placebo) oil males and 6 safflower oil females. Patientsvisited on two pre-treatment occasions each three months apart (visits 1 and 2). At visit 2 subjects were randomly assigned in double blind fashion and in equalgender numbers to take flaxseed oil or safflower oil for three further monthsuntil visit 3. Oil consumption in both groups was approximately 10 g/d. ALAintake in the intervention group was approximately 5.5 g/d. Power was 0.80 to seea difference of 1 mmol of glucose /L using 12 subjects per group with a p < 0.05.Flaxseed oil had no impact on fasting blood serum glucose, insulin or HbA1clevels. It is concluded that high doses of flaxseed oil have no effect onglycemic control in type 2 diabetics. Continue reading >>

Flaxseed And Diabetes

Flaxseed And Diabetes

Is flaxseed beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes? Does it help my prostate gland as well? – Frank, Florida Yes, flaxseed may help lower your sugar levels, and it plays a role in the prevention of prostate cancer as well. However, the strength of the evidence is too weak to permit definitive recommendations. Nonetheless, flaxseed is rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential fatty acid that appears to be beneficial in preventing heart disease and related illnesses. Flaxseed contains the right ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, is high in fiber, and provides a phytoestrogen called lignan, which may have antioxidant properties that protect against certain cancers. There is some evidence that eating flaxseed reduces blood sugar levels after a meal and increases insulin levels because of its high content of soluble fiber. (It is 28 percent fiber, of which two-thirds is soluble.) Indeed, flaxseed carbohydrate (what remains after the oil is removed) was used in a study that showed a beneficial effect. Although this result was not duplicated in other studies, flaxseed has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity. An interesting, yet unproven, potential benefit may be the prevention of type 1 and type 2 diabetes; in animal models, flaxseed has been shown to delay the onset of the disease. Flaxseed might help your prostatic health as well. In fact, the American National Cancer Institute has singled out flaxseed as one of six foods that deserve extensive research. Why? Because flaxseed contains a large amount of phytonutrients that serve as antioxidants, as well as those omega-3 fatty acids, which seem to play a role in preventing the formation of abnormal cells in the body. In terms of your specific question, flaxseed may reduce the prostate-specific antigen Continue reading >>

Flaxseed Benefits Diabetes In Many Ways!

Flaxseed Benefits Diabetes In Many Ways!

Flax for Diabetics -a nutritional powerhouse whole grain food has so many benefits for fighting diabetes. As part of a balanced + healthy diet, flax for diabetes is so excellent because it helps stabilize blood sugar + controls/prevents diabetes. Flax for diabetes is a low glycemic food and has many benefitsl due to the Omega 3, fiber, protein + Lignans found in flaxseed. Are you looking for ways to better control your blood sugar levels? Flaxseed benefits diabetes and adding flax to your daily diet may be the answer youve been looking for. Flax for Diabetics- 10 Ways Flax can help Fight + Prevent Diabetes: Flax seed is a low glycemic food and helps stabilize blood sugar levels for longer. Flax is a whole grain. Flax is an excellent source of fiber -helping your feel fuller longer. Flax has Omega 3 -which makes your brain feel satiated and helps stop cravings! Protein in flax helps the body get nutrition that takes longer to digest and process helping provide more nutrition for longer. Flax hull lignans help heal the body lessening or preventing complications from diabetes. Flax prevents spikes in blood sugar and keeps blood sugar levels more stable for longer. Research has shown that flax for diabetes as part of a daily diet can help lower and stabilize blood sugar levels. Flaxseed is an easy thing to add as part of a balanced diet and can make dramatic differences in your blood sugar as well as overall health. Many of our own customer's have told us stories of how they have tried flax for diabetes and of the successes they have had in lowering and stabilizing blood sugars. Sherrie's Flax for Diabetics success story: Here are the results I have had in only a few months. I am 52 years old and have several health problems. Type 2 diabetes and Menopause and constipation b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Eat Flaxseeds To Control Blood Sugar And Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Diabetes Diet: Eat Flaxseeds To Control Blood Sugar And Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Diabetes diet: Eat flaxseeds to control blood sugar and reduce heart disease risk Diabetes diet: Eat flaxseeds to control blood sugar and reduce heart disease risk Flaxseeds reduce blood sugar and also help lower the risk of diabetes complications such as heart disease and strokes, making them a very important food for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Flaxseeds are one of the best foods when it comes to controlling diabetes. The seeds help manage blood sugar levels, and together with lifestyle changes and medication as required, can help diabetics more easily manage their disease. Also known as linseeds, flaxseeds can improve insulin sensitivity. As they keep blood glucose stable, diabetics should experience less major spikes throughout the day. This blood sugar-lowering effect is due to flaxseeds' insoluble fibre content, reports medical website Healthline. Diabetes diet:Eat shirataki noodles to control blood sugar Research has found that insoluble fibre slows down the release of sugar into the blood and reduces blood sugar, it explained. Healthline cites several studies which have found that people with type 2 diabetes who added 10-20 grams of flaxseed powder to their daily diet for at least one month saw reductions of up to 20 per cent in blood sugar levels. Diabetes Daily notes a Canadian study that showed subjects who consumed 50g of flaxseed in meals for four weeks experienced a 27 per cent reduction in blood sugar levels after eating. Flaxseeds can also help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease and stroke, due to the high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Diabetes diet: Eat flaxseeds to control blood sugar and reduce heart disease risk Type 1 Diabetes - An autoimmune disease that prevents the body from producing insulin to regulate blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Super Seeds For Diabetics: How Are Flax Seeds Good For People With Diabetes?

Super Seeds For Diabetics: How Are Flax Seeds Good For People With Diabetes?

Home Healthcare Blogs Super Seeds for Diabetics: How Are Flax Seeds Good For People With Diabetes? Super Seeds for Diabetics: How Are Flax Seeds Good For People With Diabetes? Flaxseeds are glassy, nutty small seeds that are packed with some of the essential nutrients that our body requires, they are a good source of dietary fiber, proteins, manganese, and vitamins and are low in a lipoprotein. They are known to be health protectors because flax is a whole grain food which fights against diabetes. It is essential for a diabetic person to follow a strict balanced and a healthy diet, it is healthier when you include flax seeds in your daily diet which are beneficial to diabetic patients. We dont want too high or too low blood sugar levels that cause damage to our bodies. It is always recommended to include foods that help you feel fuller and takes a long time to break down by supplementing more nutrients to the body. These small seeds are very beneficial due to the omega 3, protein, fiber, magnesium, calcium and lignins found in them. The more whole grain, vegetables and low glycaemic foods we eat, the easier it is for our bodies to maintain and stabilize blood sugar levels. Flax seed is a low-glycaemic food that helps stabilize blood sugars which mean the blood sugar levels that increase when you intake more processed foods like white rice, sugar, flour and other foods will not increase when you eat flax. Flax will gently lower the blood sugar levels and then the sugar level stays there for a longer period. Due to its protein content, flax helps the body get nutrition that takes longer to digest and process providing nutrition for longer. Flax being an excellent source of fiber and mucilage makes you feel full for longer, stopping you from overeating, helps in relieving Continue reading >>

Flaxseed

Flaxseed

FLAXSEED Overview Information Flaxseed is the seed from the plant Linum usitatissimum. The seed or the seed oil is used to make medicine. The information on this page concerns medicine made from the SEED only. There is a separate listing for flaxseed OIL. People use flaxseed for many conditions related to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including ongoing constipation, colon damage due to overuse of laxatives, diarrhea, inflammation of the lining of the large intestine (diverticulitis), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or irritable colon, sores in the lining of the large intestine (ulcerative colitis), inflammation of the lining of the stomach (gastritis), and inflammation of the small intestine (enteritis). Flaxseed is also used for disorders of the heart and blood vessels, including high cholesterol, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), high blood pressure (hypertension), and coronary artery disease. Flaxseed is also used for acne, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), kidney problems in people with a disease called systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), symptoms of menopause, and breast pain. It is also used for diabetes, obesity and weight loss, HIV/AIDS, depression, bladder infections, malaria, and rheumatoid arthritis. Other uses include treatment of sore throat, upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), and cough. Some people use flaxseed to lower their risk of getting weak bones (osteoporosis) and to protect against breast cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer. Flaxseed is sometimes applied to the skin for acne, burns, boils, eczema, psoriasis, and to soothe inflammation. How does it work? Flaxseed is a good source of dietary fiber and omega-3 fatty acids. The fiber in flaxseed is found primarily in the seed coat. Taken befo Continue reading >>

Flaxseed And Diabetes.

Flaxseed And Diabetes.

Abstract Flaxseed contains 32% to 45% of its mass as oil of which 51% to 55% is α-linolenic acid. Flax lignan complex and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) have been isolated from flaxseed. Flaxseed and its components have antioxidant, hypolipidemic and hypoglycemic effects. These are mostly due to the SDG content. Oxidative stress has been implicated in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Flaxseed, flaxseed oil and flax lignan complex have not been investigated as to whether they reduce the incidence of diabetes and/or delay the development of diabetes. However, their effects on serum glucose have been studied. Flaxseed and flax lignan complex improve glycemic control. Animal models of type I diabetes involving streptozotocin administration or utilizing Bio-Breed diabetic (BBdp) prone rats are associated with oxidative stress. SDG treatment reduced the incidence of diabetes using serum glucose levels by 75% in the streptozotocin model of diabetes and by 72% in the BBdp rat model of diabetes. These reductions in development of diabetes were associated with decreases in oxidative stress measured by serum and pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA). SDG delays the development of diabetes in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes and this effect was associated with a reduction in serum MDA and glycated haemoglobin A1C. The data suggest that SDG may have a great potential for reducing the incidence of type 1 diabetes and delaying the development of type 2 diabetes in humans. Continue reading >>

Flaxseed Oil: Good Or Not For Diabetes Type 2?

Flaxseed Oil: Good Or Not For Diabetes Type 2?

Flaxseed Oil: Good or not for diabetes type 2? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Flaxseed Oil: Good or not for diabetes type 2? I've been reading about flaxseed oil being good for type 2's and in a different article, should be avoided by diabetics on certain meds like Metformin. I am taking Met 2x a day at the maximum mg. I am confused by some articles saying it benefits diabetics and others say to avoid it. Which is right? According to the University of Maryland Medical Center's website, flaxseed can raise your bg levels if you are takng Met. But there are many people here who eat flaxseed and say that it actually helps their bg levels. I would experiment to see. Let us know how it works for you. There may be truth in what you say. I eat raw flaxseed (for its fats) many times during the day. If I overeat it a bit my BGs tend to rise even on an empty stomach. I was afraid of the responses. I just bought a huge bottle of flaxseed oil and now I don't think I'll even use it. I got my dh to take one this morning so maybe he'll take a shine to them. I do have flax seed so I guess I'll use thosemore often. I use ground flaxseed all the time to make all sorts of baked goods. I find I get very little bg spikes from flaxseed. Sometime it will actually push my bg down. Flaxseed is basically all fiber so it shouldn't affect bg. It does have fat like any seed so if you are sensitive to fat you may need to be careful. Since using flaxseed I have raised my HDL to 89 I taker flax oil, 2000 mg per day, as a vegetarian source of EFA's. I also take an algae-source supplement of EPA and DHA (longer-chain EFA's not available in flax). I have nev Continue reading >>

Flaxseed Oil Omega-3 Fatty Acids: A New Treatment For Diabetic Foot Ulcer?

Flaxseed Oil Omega-3 Fatty Acids: A New Treatment For Diabetic Foot Ulcer?

This study investigated the effects of supplementation with flaxseed oil omega-3 fatty acids on diabetic foot ulcers. They found that treatment with omega-3 fatty acids improved diabetic would healing over a 12-week period. Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a serious complication of diabetes, causing a debilitating effect on quality of life. DFU is difficult to treat as normal wound healing processes are not as effective in patients with diabetes. Wound healing is greatly influenced by the bodys inflammatory response. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to mediate inflammatory responses and improve wound healing. This study investigated if supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids, derived from flaxseed oil, improved wound healing. This study included 60 patients with a grade 3 diabetic foot ulcer. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group received 1000 mg/day of omega-3 fatty acids from flaxseed oil. The other group received placebo (inactive oil). All patients continued taking standard medication to treat diabetic foot (ciprofloxacin, clindamycin). Wound healing parameters and blood glucose control were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Patients who received omega-3 supplementation had decreased ulcer length, width and depth after 12 weeks. Improved insulin homeostasis (balance) was also reported in these patients. Patients who received omega-3 supplementation reported no adverse events. There was also a reduction in markers of inflammation, such as c-reactive protein. This study concluded that treatment with omega-3 fatty acids improved diabetic would healing over a 12-week period. No adverse effects were reported. There were less women (14) included in the trial than men (46). The method of measuring wound healing was not the most accu Continue reading >>

Flaxseed Oil | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Flaxseed Oil | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been taking Flaxseed Oil as a recommended remedy for dry skin around my face. It does appear to be helping, but I want some reassurance that it's not bad for me in other ways before I buy another pot. I take 4000mg per day (morning and evening). It contains Flaxseed Oil (Linseed Oil), Modified starch, Gylcerine, Carrageenan, Di-Sodium Phosphate. I think that the biggest potential problem is for people who take blood thinning drugs and who also eat large quantities of flax/flax oil. Linseed is highly recommended, I buy the Linseed and grind the seeds in our coffee grinder. Then use about 2 spoonful's over my breakfast. The seeds should be ground so you can gain all its goodness. Now all my family enjoy adding ground seeds to their meals. Its also good exercise for my arms when using the grinding machine. Thanks for the link phoenix - I can't see anything in there that should worry me particularly, though no mention of any benefits to the skin either. Isn't it Linseed that you rub in to cricket bats? Could give a nice tinge to my complexion. swimmer - flaxseed oil is good for the skin, and all sorts of other health benefits as well, its a good thing to take. But what wd really well for my dry skin, is coconut oil (I cook/bake with it, take it off the spoon as well) I rub a small amount into my skin, doesnt leave a greasy film at all, I alternate this with Organic Manuka Honey Lotion from Holland and Barrett. Thanks Whitby I will get hold of some of the coconut oil and try that, but will probably continue with the flaxseed as well. Continue reading >>

Flax Seeds & Diabetes

Flax Seeds & Diabetes

Flaxseed is a popular item in the health food aisle, but it's not new -- evidence of flaxseed cultivation dates back to ancient times. Flax has long been considered a healthful seed, and preliminary research confirms some of its benefits. While flaxseed's full nutrition profile may not yet be understood, its touted benefits are often linked to omega-3 fatty acid, fiber and lignan content. In people with diabetes, adding flaxseed to the diet may impart helpful benefits, including blood sugar control, improvement of cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and a potential role in kidney health. However, larger studies are needed to fully understand the role of flaxseed in diabetes management. Video of the Day Flaxseed may help lower blood sugar levels. A study published in the September 2011 issue of “Journal of Dietary Supplements” showed that participants whose diets were supplemented with flaxseed powder experienced a 20 percent drop in average fasting blood sugar levels. Another study published in the July 2009 issue of "International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition" reported a 12 percent reduction in average fasting blood sugars in participants whose diets were supplemented with flax gum. Participants in both studies had type 2 diabetes. While the precise reason for the benefit is unknown, the fiber in flax may be responsible. Flax contains mucilage, or gum -- a gluey, gel-forming fiber that can slow digestion and allow the glucose from foods to be digested and released into the blood more slowly. These studies were small and short-term, so larger studies are needed to better understand the role of flax in blood sugar control. Cholesterol and Triglyceride Lowering In addition to blood sugar improvements, these studies linked flax to improved cholesterol and tr Continue reading >>

Flaxseed For Better Health And Better Blood Sugars?

Flaxseed For Better Health And Better Blood Sugars?

I just love flaxseed, and one I supplement with daily. Flaxseed has an amazing amount of benefits to help promote overall health. In saying that, how can one find flaxseed? What actual benefits does organic flaxseed provide? Can it help prevent your blood sugars from spiking? For that and much, much more, continue reading! Flaxseed oil is an excellent supplement that supports the body’s vital systems. It is rich in the omega-3 essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA. Although omega-3s are crucial to human health, they are not manufactured by the body, so it’s important to get a steady supply through dietary sources and supplements. There are two types of essential fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6. Most Americans get enough omega-6 fatty acids from dietary sources such as meat, eggs and dairy. Omega-3s are necessary for growth, heart health and brain function, but many of us do not get enough of them from dietary sources. MayoClinic.com reports that multiple studies have shown that omega-3 supplements may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. These supplements have also been studied as a treatment for depression and other mental illnesses, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, PMS, ADHD, osteoporosis, and even cancer prevention. Benefits of Flaxseed Flaxseed oil offers a wide range of health benefits. There are some studies showing that flaxseed oil can reduce total cholesterol and LDL (low density lipoprotein also known as bad cholesterol). This, however, is dependent on how well the alpha-linolenic acid is broken down into EPA and DHA. Flaxseed oil is likely to make platelets less sticky, which could help to reduce the risk of heart attack. It may also lower blood pressure and triglyceride levels (fat in the blood). Flaxseed oil has a Continue reading >>

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