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Fish Fry For Diabetics

A Lower Carb Southern Style Fish Fry

A Lower Carb Southern Style Fish Fry

Home A Lower Carb Southern Style Fish Fry Lower Carb Southern Style Fish Fry- A fish fry with all the high carb trimmings is a popular menu item and family meal in many areas including the Southern U.S. A typical fish fry can sometimes exceed over 90gm carbohydrate! I decided to tweak this meal to make it less of a carb-tastrophe and a little more diabetes-friendly. Fried catfish is included in my version so you would want to continue to let this be a special occasion meal. The catfish isfried in a light cornmeal batter then placed atop a bed of shredded cabbage and drizzled with a no sugar added slaw-type dressing. The cornmeal batter replaces hushpuppies made of cornmeal. No fish fry is complete without potatoes, so I included a few waffle fries as a garnish. I want to call this a fish fry salad! Hope this lets you enjoy a favorite meal without worrying about a spike in your glucose levels. Leave me a comment and let me know what you think! Turn this traditionally high carb meal into a diabetes-friendly salad featuring fried catfish and slaw. 3/4-1 # catfish filets or your favorite type fish 2 Tablespoons unbleached all purpose flour Frozen waffle fries- about 3 per person- baked per package instructions Slice the fish fillets into strips and place in a small bowl. Combine the cornmeal and flour in a small bowl. Salt and pepper the filets and coat lightly in cornmeal mixture. Fry the fish in hot oil until golden brown, allow fish to drain on a paper towel lined plate or on a rack. Prepare the dressing by combining all the dressing ingredients in a small bowl. To assemble: Place about 1 cup sliced cabbage on plate with radish slices and a few cherry tomatoes. Arrange 2 -3 slices of fish over cabbage then drizzle with dressing. Garnish with 3 waffle fries. Repeat proce Continue reading >>

11 Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

11 Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

Healthy Strategies and Suggestions for Keeping Good Blood Sugar Control By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images Eating out with diabetes can be stressful. Restaurants are in the business of selling food, not helping you stick to your diet. So, when you're eating out, you'll see, smell and hear about foods that you'd probably like to eat. It's sometimes easier to stick to your meal plan when you're eating in a more controlled environment, like your own home. Still, it is possible to eat out and not blow your diabetic diet . Here are some strategies and food suggestions for sticking to your diabetic meal plan when eating out. Think ahead about what you might eat before you arrive at the restaurant. If you are familiar with the menu, review it in your head and try to narrow down your options before you arrive. If you're less familiar with the menu, see if you can find it online or call ahead to inquire about it. It's easy to find something on a menu that you want to eat, but it takes longer to find something that will both satisfy your cravings and be compliant with your meal plan. Spending some time thinking about it ahead of time should help you to make a smarter food decision at the moment. For sit-down meals, build your meal by using the plate method . First, pick your lean protein (fish or skinless chicken breast), next your vegetable, fruit, low-fat dairy, and starch. When your food arrives, check that the portions match the plate method directions (1/2 your plate should consist of vegetables, 1/4 lean protein, 1/4 starch and a fruit and a low-fat dairy). If there is excess, ask for a doggie-bag and package up the excess food before you start to eat. If it isn't already posted, request nutrien Continue reading >>

The Best Fish For Diabetics

The Best Fish For Diabetics

Diabetes is a disease that affects your body's ability to properly use and store sugars from the foods you eat. Your body either does not make or does not respond to insulin, which is the chemical that causes glucose to be removed from your blood after a meal. While most diabetics can enjoy all foods in moderation, your diet should consist mainly of healthy foods full of vitamins and minerals. Fish is an excellent food for diabetics because it provides many of the nutrients found in meat without unnecessary saturated fat and calories. The American Heart Association indicates that you should have two 3.5-ounce servings of fish per week for the greatest health benefits. Video of the Day Salmon is a fatty fish full of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, but low in saturated fat. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics are at increased risk for developing heart disease, and omega-3 fats are important for your cardiovascular health. The American Heart Association indicates that omega-3s decrease triglyceride levels, lower blood pressure, slow the rate of plaques forming in your arteries and decrease the risk of developing an abnormal heart rhythm. Salmon provides you with lean protein that will lead to weight loss, and protein has been shown to help regulate your blood sugar. Salmon is also low in mercury, and you can safely consume up to twelve ounces per week. It is available in wild and farmed varieties. Prepare your salmon meals by baking, grilling or broiling. Avoid frying salmon to keep from taking in unnecessary saturated fat. Sardines are also a good source of omega-3 fats, and they are low in saturated fat. They contain as much calcium as a glass of milk, the B vitamin niacin, protein and iron. They are a convenient fish choice, since you can buy them Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

Why Would Eating Fish Increase Diabetes Risk?

Why Would Eating Fish Increase Diabetes Risk?

In the past two years, six separate meta-analyses have been published on the relationship between fish consumption and type 2 diabetes. The whole point of a meta-analysis is to compile the best studies done to date and see what the overall balance of evidence shows. The fact that there are six different ones published recently highlights how open the question remains. One thread of consistency, though, was that fish consumers in the United States tended to be at greater risk for diabetes. If we include Europe, then fish eaters appeared to have a 38% increased risk of diabetes. On a per serving basis, that comes out to be about a 5% increase in risk for every serving of fish one has per week. To put that into perspective, a serving of red meat per day is associated with 19% increase in risk. Just one serving per day of fish would be equivalent to a 35% increase in risk. But why might fish be worse than red meat? Fish intake may increase type 2 diabetes risk by increasing blood sugar levels, as a review of the evidence commissioned by the U.S. government found. The review found that blood sugars increase in diabetics given fish oil. Another possible cause is that omega 3’s appear to cause oxidative stress. A recent study, highlighted in my video, Fish and Diabetes, found that the insulin producing cells in the pancreas don’t appear to work as well in people who eat two or more servings of fish a week. Or it may not be related to omega 3’s at all but rather the environmental contaminants that build up in fish. It all started with Agent Orange. We sprayed 20 million gallons of the stuff on Vietnam, and some of it was contaminated with trace amounts of dioxins. Though the Red Cross estimates that a million Vietnamese were adversely affected, what about all the servicem Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Balance Your Choices When you have type 2 diabetes, you need to eat a good mix of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. So what's a well-balanced dinner? A power breakfast? The following meal examples can help you make better choices. Some people find it helps to count carbs. Keep in mind recommendations from your doctor or nutritionist, too. The Count: 2,060 calories, 276 g carbs No food is off-limits with diabetes, but this brunch will blow your carb and calorie budget in a hurry. Experts suggest that meals for people with diabetes should have 45-75 grams of carbohydrates, depending on individual goals. Your body weight, activity, and medications all matter. This meal packs enough carbs for four to five meals. The Count: 294 calories, 40 g carbs This quick meal delivers protein in a scrambled egg, and just 40 carbs, mostly from fiber-rich oatmeal and blueberries. Fiber slows digestion to help prevent blood sugar spikes. People with diabetes need to watch all types of carbs: cereal, bread, rice, pasta, starchy veggies, sweets, fruit, milk, and yogurt. Spread your total carbs across the day. The Count: 1,760 calories, 183 g carbs. Before one bite of burrito, you can get 98 grams of carbs and 810 calories in a basket of chips and salsa. If you're trying to slim down and eat less sodium, like many people with diabetes, the burrito adds 950 calories. You also get way more than a whole day's worth of sodium. The Count: 443 calories, 48 g carbs Lean beef and black beans make this Mexican dish a good option for a diabetic diet. The fiber in the beans can help lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Go heavy on the veggies and light on cheese. Enjoy 10 small corn chips (1 ounce) with a little guacamole. The Count: 2,510 calories, 83 g carbs This classic Southern m Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

By:Lori Brookhart-Schervish | Diabetic Living Magazine These top food offenders contain high amounts of fat, sodium, carbs, and calories that may increase your risk of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, uncontrolled blood sugar, and weight gain. The good news is you can indulge in your favorite foods and still eat healthfully with our satisfying and delicious alternatives. At Diabetic Living, we believe that eating with diabetes doesn't have to mean deprivation, starvation, or bland and boring foods. However, some foods really are best left on the table or in the store. Everyone -- with diabetes or without -- would be wise to avoid or limit the foods on this list because they are high in saturated fat, sodium, calories, or carbs, or might contain trans fats. High amounts of sodium and saturated fat can lead to heart disease, while excess sugars, high carb counts, and added calories can cause unwanted weight gain and blood sugar spikes. If you see some of your favorite foods on this list, don't despair: We've picked healthier options for you to choose from that taste great. So you can have your fries and eat them, too -- provided they're baked rather than deep-fat fried. *Nutrition information cited was gathered from company websites or food packaging. You walk into a restaurant and you're feeling starved. A quick scan of the menu and there they are: nachos, one of your favorites. You order them as an appetizer and also order a meal. Unfortunately, most restaurant nacho orders equate to and often exceed an entire meal's worth of calories, carbs, and fat. For example, a regular order of Chili's Classic Nachos has 830 calories, 59 grams of fat, and 39 grams of carb. You don't need to give up nachos to eat healthfully. Make a few changes to the basic rec Continue reading >>

Fab Fish, Chips And Peas

Fab Fish, Chips And Peas

This version is just as tasty and healthier than a chip shop version. Each 596g serving contains (excludes serving suggestion) 2 large potatoes, cut into thick chips and parboiled for 5 minutes 2 x 200g pieces white fish fillet of your choice lemon wedges and freshly ground black pepper, to serve Toss the parboiled chips in 2 tsp oil and season with plenty of black pepper. Spread the chips out on a non-stick baking sheet and cook for 25-30 minutes until golden and tender. Meanwhile, put the fish fillets onto a plate and dredge with flour, making sure they are well coated. Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and add the remaining tsp of oil, wiping it around the pan with kitchen paper. Shake off any excess flour and carefully lay the fish fillets down in the pan and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side. Heat the peas in a small pan of boiling water, drain then roughly mash. Mix the tartar sauce and yogurt together. Serve fish, chips, peas and tartar sauce with a sprinkle of black pepper, a wedge of lemon and a salad garnish. Dredging fish with flour before frying stops the surface of the fish from burning. For extra flavour you can add seasoning to the flour just salt and pepper, or spices such as Chinese five spice or smoked paprika. Use fine chickpea flour for a gluten-free alternative. Someone is diagnosed with diabetes every two minutes. Your donation can change lives. Continue reading >>

Breading For Meats For Diabetics

Breading For Meats For Diabetics

Tempura and most other breadings are high in carbohydrates. Recipes for breaded meat, fish and poultry often call for flour and other carbohydrate-rich ingredients. If you have diabetes, eating breaded meats could pose a problem for your blood sugar levels. Preparing breaded meat with ingredients that are less likely to disrupt your blood sugar levels is the best way to enjoy breaded foods without negatively impacting your health. Almonds are lower in carbs and contain more fiber and healthy fats compared to wheat flour. You can replace all or part of the white flour in your breading recipe with the same amount of almond meal to get a similar result. You can find almond meal at most health food stores, but you can get a fresher almond meal for less money by grinding almonds yourself until you get a coarse flour-like consistency. An almond breading goes well with white fish and chicken. Parmesan cheese contains no carbohydrates, which means that it doesn't affect your blood sugar levels. You can replace all of the flour in your breading recipe with grated Parmesan cheese, which will create a crispy crust on your meat when cooked. Dip your slices of chicken or meat in beaten eggs before coating them with Parmesan cheese to help the breading stick as much as possible. Coconut flour is made from the white flesh of a coconut and is very low in carbohydrates and high in fiber compared to any whole grain flour. The nutritional profile of coconut flour makes it a great choice for breading meats for people with diabetes. Simply dip shrimp, chicken, fish or meat in beaten eggs before rolling in coconut flour until well coated. You can bake your breaded meat in the oven or lightly fry it in a small amount of coconut oil. Choosing ingredients that have a lower carbohydrate content Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Fish Consumption And Frying Of Fish In Relation To Type 2 Diabetes Incidence: A Prospective Cohort Study Of Swedish Men

Fish Consumption And Frying Of Fish In Relation To Type 2 Diabetes Incidence: A Prospective Cohort Study Of Swedish Men

Fish consumption and frying of fish in relation to type 2 diabetes incidence: a prospective cohort study of Swedish men 2Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK 1Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden 2Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK Alice Wallin, Phone: +46 8 524 873 35, Email: [email protected] . Received 2015 Aug 25; Accepted 2015 Dec 6. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015 This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Epidemiological evidence on the association between fish consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes is heterogeneous across geographical regions. Differences related to fish consumption pattern could possibly help explain the discrepancy between the findings. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between fish consumption (total, fried, specific fish items) and type 2 diabetes incidence, taking exposure to contaminants present in fish (polychlorinated biphenyls and methyl mercury) into consideration. The population-based Cohort of Swedish Men, including 35,583 men aged 4579years, was followed from 1998 to 2012. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards models. During 15years of follow-up, 3624 incident cases were identified. Total fish consumption (4 servings/week vs. <1 serving/week) was not associated with type 2 diabetes in multivariable-adjusted analysis (HR 1.00; 95% CI 0.851.18); however, a statistically non-significant inverse association was observed after adju Continue reading >>

What Foods Have Little Or No Effect On Blood Sugar In People With Diabetes?

What Foods Have Little Or No Effect On Blood Sugar In People With Diabetes?

The type of food you eat can affect your blood sugar levels if you have diabetes. Raw foods, for example, are digested more slowly than cooked foods. Foods that are broken down more slowly release glucose into the blood more slowly. Foods that contain fat also take longer to digest than foods without fat. That's why an ice cream cone or a chocolate bar may not cause blood sugar levels to rise as quickly as you might expect. Checking your blood sugar two hours after eating carbohydrates is the best way to learn the effects of different foods. Moderation is key. At one time, people with diabetes were told not to eat sweets at all. Today, sweets and snacks are allowed, but portions need to be small and balanced during the day. Anything that used to run, walk, crawl, slither, fly, or swim will have little effect on your blood sugar. Basically, a properly sized serving of meat or fish has no effect on your blood sugar. Now if you take a piece of fish and batter-and-deep-fry it, it becomes a white food. If you don’t have a gas grill yet, this would be a good time to buy one. Cheese is another freebie, having little or no effect on your blood sugar. Same for the green veggies. Fruit can raise your blood sugar, but it can also be very healthy for you, especially fresh fruit. You’ll just have to use your meter to see how various types of fruit affect you. Beans are middle of the road, and nuts tend to treat blood sugar well, but are high in calories, so too many can cause you to put on weight. Taming the Tiger: Your first year with Diabetes If you ve just been diagnosed with diabetes, this book is for you! It is a fact. Getting a diagnosis of diabetes has the same impact on your body and soul as having a heart attack. Right now you are... Continue reading >>

Do Fried Foods Affect Blood Sugar?

Do Fried Foods Affect Blood Sugar?

Fried foods affect your blood sugar because fat slows down digestion. When you eat simple carbohydrates, your body can quickly convert them into glucose and your blood sugar levels rise. Fried foods usually contain carbohydrates, but the fat slows digestion. Instead of your blood sugar rising immediately, you may see a higher glucose level a few hours later. Video of the Day The faster your body can digest food, the faster and higher your glucose levels rise. If glucose levels rise too quickly, your pancreas may produce too much insulin, setting up a cycle of high and low blood sugar that can lead to insulin resistance, a precursor to Type 2 diabetes. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar, have the biggest impact on blood sugar levels. Complex carbs, such as fiber, help slow digestion and regulate glucose and insulin production. Any food that slows digestion, including fat and protein, slows glucose production. Fried Foods and Blood Sugar Fried foods affect your blood sugar levels differently, depending on what food is fried. French fries raise blood sugar faster than fried chicken, especially if the chicken is not breaded because chicken is protein and potatoes are carbohydrates. According to the American Diabetes Association, glucose production depends on the following: the quantity of carbohydrates consumed, the type of sugar and starch in those carbs, whether the carbs are combined with fat and/or protein and the cooking process. Although the fat may slow down digestion, the nature of the fat in fried foods -- trans fats -- are very bad for diabetics. Weight Gain and Insulin Resistance Carbohydrates and protein have 4 calories per gram, but fat has 9 calories per gram. Fried foods are often very high in calories. For example, a 3-oz. grilled skinless chicken breast ha Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Patient Eat A Fried Fish?

Can A Diabetic Patient Eat A Fried Fish?

Updated 9w ago Author has 184 answers and 376.8k answer views I have been coming across a lot of questions along these lines. Can diabetics eat this food item or that item? I will repeat what I have been writing in my earlier answers. The question should be whether a diabetic should eat a particular food item and not whether a diabetic can eat a particular food item. It is amount of carbohydrate that will determine the amount by which your blood glucose rises. So, higher the carb intake, higher will be the rice in your blood sugar levels. Fish, fried in LCHF friendly fats like butter, VCO, or Ghee will have virtually no carbohydrates and a lot of good fats. It can be and should be consumed by a diabetic person (provided they are non-vegetarian). Avoid the use of additives like batter, cornflour, bread crumbs etc. as they will add to the carb count and will turn a perfectly healthy LCHF food into a carb loaded unhealthy meal choice. George Van Winkle , former Senior Technical Services Engineer (2007-2013) Answered 14w ago Author has 95 answers and 27.9k answer views Diabetics dietary needs and tolerances will vary depending on the progression of the disease. Generally, fried foods add unnecessary large quantities of fats to foods. If the food is breaded or battered and then fried, it adds carbs and soaks up even more fat. Reasonable quantities of healthy fats are an essential part of a healthy diet, but frying foods usually adds more fat than is healthy in a balanced diet. Grilled, broiled, or poached fish is a way to get the good benefits (healthy protein) and healthy fats from fish like Salmon or Tuna without all the extra bad fats and carbohydrates of breaded and fried versions of the same fish. Try using a citrus juice like lemon or lime to add flavor as you grill o Continue reading >>

Eating Fish And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Eating Fish And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A population-based, prospective follow-up study 1Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Find articles by Jacqueline C.M. Witteman 1Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Corresponding author: Geertruida J. van Woudenbergh, [email protected] . Received 2009 Jun 8; Accepted 2009 Aug 2. Copyright 2009 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To investigate the relation between total fish, type of fish (lean and fatty), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in a population-based cohort. The analysis included 4,472 Dutch participants aged 55 years without diabetes at baseline. Dietary intake was assessed with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (relative risk [RR]) with 95% CIs were used to examine risk associations adjusted for age, sex, lifestyle, and nutritional factors. After 15 years of follow-up, 463 participants developed type 2 diabetes. Median fish intake, mainly lean fish (81%), was 10 g/day. Total fish intake was associated positively with risk of type 2 diabetes; the RR was 1.32 (95% CI 1.021.70) in the highest total fish group (28 g/day) compared with that for nonfish eaters (Ptrend = 0.04). Correspon Continue reading >>

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