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First Appointment With Diabetic Nurse

Diabetic Clinic - Morland House Surgery

Diabetic Clinic - Morland House Surgery

We are changing the way we organise appointments and provide support for people who have Type 2 Diabetes by putting in place a new way of working called care and support planning. This way of working aims to give you the opportunity to get more out of your annual review appointments by reorganising the way things happen and giving you more information before you see our Specialist Diabetes Nurse, Lucy. It should help you to talk about: What you can do to look after your health and stay well This way of working is being put into place across a number of surgeries in the area and is nearly always preferred by patients. It will help both you and our Specialist Diabetes Nurse Lucy make the best use of the time you have in your care and support planning appointment. All the important tests and results needed at your appointment will be available to you before the appointment as well as an opportunity to think through what questions you want to ask and identify your key concerns which you want to talk about. This means that your care and support planning review will take place over two separate appointments and you will have time to think about what you want to get out of these visits. At the first appointment, (which you will be invited to make in your birth month) you will be asked to attend the surgery to have a number of tests done with a healthcare assistant. The tests will include a blood test (non-fasting), weight, blood pressure and foot check. The healthcare assistant will book your next appointment which will be with our Specialist Diabetes Nurse, Lucy. Your test results from this appointment will be sent to you with an explanation of what they mean. There will also be a space on the letters for you to make notes. This will give you a chance to think about what you Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nurse (first Visit).

Diabetic Nurse (first Visit).

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've seen lots of people asking about first visit with the diabetic nurse, and as I had my first visit today, i thought I'd say, I had built it up in my mind to be worse than it was. She was very nice, and asked on my feelings of being diagnosed. She gave me a lot of information and explanation on things, and told me how things would be managed, what we were aiming for in terms of bg levels and stuff. She reasured me that I was normal in what i was thinking and feeling, and we had a chat about how my diagnosis would affect the other meds i was already on, and that she would be working around those as they were already doing what they were supposed to, and it would make things worse in terms of my mental health and my diabeties if they were changed to suit the diabeties. This reasured me as I had been worried about that. She checked my blood pressure, and my weight and my feet (with a funny little plastic thing just to check nerves were being as they should) She gave me a perscription for foot balm, as the otc creams i've been using for dry skin on my feet were not quite effective enough. She listened to the changes i've made to excersise and diet since being diagnosed, and gave me a few tips. I came away feeling a lot more informed, and feeling a bit better about things. So yeah, hope this helps others that are worried about seeing the diabetic nurse for the first time It is always comforting to see positive posts like yours. Me too I had a good experience when I saw the Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed following blood or urine tests for something else. However, you should see your GP straight away if you have any symptoms of diabetes . To find out if you have type 2 diabetes, you usually have to go through the following steps: Your GP will check your urine and arrange a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. It usually takes about 1 to 2 days for the results to come back. If you have diabetes, your GP will ask you to come in again so they can explain the test results and what will happen next. What your GP will discuss with you during your appointment depends on the diagnosis and the treatment they recommend. what high blood sugar means for your health your lifestyle for example, alcohol and smoking Your GP will do their best to discuss the diagnosis with you, but this first appointment might only be 10 to 15 minutes. If you have questions about your diagnosis It's usually difficult to take in everything the GP tells you during the appointment. Talk to family and friends about what the GP told you, and write down any questions you have. Then make another GP appointment and take your list of questions with you. There's also a lot of information on diabetes available. Usually, the following things happen after your diagnosis: Your GP will prescribe medication . It might take time for you to get used to the medication and to find the right doses for you. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

There are certain things that you should expect from your medical team. If you have just been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you should have: A full medical examination- this may also include a referral to a specialist eye clinic. A talk with a diabetes care nurse who will explain what diabetes is and about your treatment. Several sessions with your diabetes nurse for basic instruction on injection technique, looking after your insulin, blood glucose meter and pen, blood glucose testing and what the results of your own testing means. You should also expect to have a discussion about hypoglycaemia (hypos) and how to deal with it. After this initial help, you should have access to a diabetes care team where you will have the opportunity to talk to doctors, nurses and dieticians. They will assess your diabetes control and discuss any problems with you. You should also be given a contact number so that you are able to contact a member of the team for advice whenever you need it. Most diabetic clinics have a specialist nurse who will visit you at home between hospital appointments especially in the early days after your diagnosis. Each year you are entitled to an Annual Review assessment by the diabetes care team.This should include a blood pressure check, a measurement of height and weight, drawing blood to find out your cholesterol level and your HbA1c (average blood glucose over the last few weeks), plus a urine test to check whether your kidneys are working well. They should also examine your feet and reflexes to check that your nerves are okay, and they may ask you whether you smoke and offer help to give up if you would like to do so. In addition, the annual review should include an examination of your eyes, although this may be done at a specialist eye clinic. Drops w Continue reading >>

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E Sf A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E Sf A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

Diabetes: First Steps After Diagnosis What you need to know today A diabetes diagnosis can take some getting used to. Try to take it one day at a time. Although you’ll eventually want to learn as much as you can about diabetes, you can begin with the basics below. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong disease that makes it hard for your body to get energy from the food you eat. This problem is closely tied to how your body makes and uses a hormone called insulin. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body has stopped making insulin. In people with type 2 diabetes, either the body can’t use insulin very well, or it doesn’t make enough insulin, or both. Regardless of the type of diabetes you have, the net result is the same: trouble controlling the amount of glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream. What does it mean for my health? Even if you feel fine, diabetes affects your health. That’s because when you have diabetes, you tend to have too much glucose in your bloodstream. From time to time, you may also have too little blood glucose. Uncontrolled blood glucose levels can cause serious short-term and long-term health problems. Some of these problems you may have already experienced as symptoms, such as fatigue or thirst. Other possible problems related to diabetes — such as heart, kidney, and eye disease — may develop later. Controlling your blood glucose can lower your risk of these problems. How is diabetes treated? Treating your diabetes means controlling your blood glucose. It also means treating any other health problems you may have, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. This is a day-in, day-out responsibility — and it’s largely up to you. That’s why you’ll see a lot of emphasis on â Continue reading >>

Preparing For Your Diabetes-focused Visit

Preparing For Your Diabetes-focused Visit

Preparing for Your Diabetes-Focused Visit Know your team. Stay connected. Prepare for your diabetes care. Live well. For people living with diabetes, keeping track of your diabetes information and any questions that arise can be challenging. It is a complex disease, and good diabetes care requires preparation, organization and follow up by both patients and their primary care providers*. In response to this challenge, Diabetes Canada has developed tracking tools to help you be best prepared for visits with your doctor and the rest of your diabetes team. It is important that certain visits with your health-care team focus specifically on your diabetes. How to prepare for your diabetes-focused visit Your diabetes visits will be more effective if you are prepared and know what to expect. Have laboratory tests done before your visit to help your doctor and diabetes health-care team focus on next steps in the organization of your diabetes care. Bring blood glucose records with you (written down or printed from meter). Bring a list of all medications, including non-prescrpion drugs and let your team know which need to be refilled. Save any non-urgent, non-diabetes questions for another visit. This will ensure that your diabetes gets the full attention it deserves. Seeing your doctor only for diabetes-related issues will allow sufficient time for you and your doctor to discuss your management of the disease and any problems or changes you are experiencing. Ideally, you should have four appointments each year dedicated solely to diabetes care, during which your blood pressure should be checked, your feet examined and your medications reviewed, among other things. Use any of the tracking tools below, for your unique needs. The tools can help you to: Keep track of your numbers a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education Centre

Diabetes Education Centre

Permanently discard changes to this page. Monday through to Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM You can set up an appointment yourself with the Diabetes Nurse or the Registered Dietitian by phoning 519-421-4233 extension 2126. Your physician's office may also refer you and make the appointment for you. Remember to bring your health card with you. Where do I register on my first appointment? Follow up visits? Go directly to the Diabetes Education Centre at the Woodstock Hospital, Athlone Avenue entrance, 310 Juliana Drive, Woodstock. Located in Woodstock Hospital , lower level, Athlone Avenue entrance, 310 Juliana Drive, Woodstock. The registration clerkcan assist you with finding the office, or classroom, depending on the type of appointment. It is staffed by Diabetes Nurses registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario, and Dietitians registered with the College of Dietitians of Ontario. The Diabetes Education Centre provides education and support to individuals newly diagnosed or with established diabetes and to their families. The Diabetes Educators through individual counselling or classes help the individual with diabetes develop self-management skills from blood glucose monitoring, general lifestyle, meal planning, to preventcomplications and staying healthy while living with diabetes. The WH Diabetes Education Centre is also an Assisted Devices Program (ADP) registered Pump Centre. This is a two-hour seminar with the Diabetes Nurse and the Registered Dietitian, whichprovides education regarding general lifestyle strategies and meal planning to help delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes. Individual Diabetes Assessment/Diabetes Diet Counselling This is a two-hour appointment with the Diabetes Nurse and Registered Dietitian which includes one hour with the nurse for blo Continue reading >>

First Diabetic Nurse Appointment Done

First Diabetic Nurse Appointment Done

Author Topic: First Diabetic Nurse Appointment done (Read 6866 times) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Well I am back from my first appointment after being diagnosed last week. i have to say she was lovely and spent well over an hour with me. Explained all the test results to me. My hbc1a was 6.2 which she said was really good ! Is that right? Considering i didnt know I had diabetes until last week I wasnt exactly eating the right stuff the last 3 months so I am guessing I can now get that lower? My cholestral is 4.8 which is ok but could be lower needs to be around 4 and under she said? My blood pressure was 134/70 which again is pretty good I am 5'10 and quite overweight. She answered all my questions and agreed carbs increases sugar levels but would not go as far to say leave them out completely but agreed lowering them was a good idea. She weighed and measured me and apparnetly in a couple of months I am having the full MOT and she is seeing me again in 4 weeks. She is also sending me on a DESMOND course and having my eyes digitally photographed. All in all I was really pelased with the appointment she also gave mne her direct number and said ring anytime with any questions. She was really lovley. Does this all sound about right did sh emiss anything ? Live as if tomorrow was your last day learn as if you were to live forever Metformin 1000mg slow release once a day Re: First Diabetic Nurse Appointment done Reply #2 on: 06 March 2012, 07:09:43 PM It sounds like you have a keeper there Dalaney! No Nursie Nightshade that one. It's refreshing to hear about good ones. My cholestral is 4.8 which is ok but could be lower needs to be around 4 and under she said? . Hmmm the total cholesterol figure means very little. When you go to have your next bloods done a Continue reading >>

Your Child's Appointment With The Diabetes Service

Your Child's Appointment With The Diabetes Service

Your child's appointment with the diabetes service Your child's appointment with the diabetes service This page explains what you and your child can expect atyourdiabetes appointment. Children are normally referred to the diabetes service by their GP.Some also come to us from the accident and emergency department or through the intensive care unit. Our diabetes clinics take place every Wednesday morning and Thursday afternoon. If you need to change or cancel your childs appointment for any reason, please contact the appointments centre on 020 7188 7188 ext 53102 or email [email protected] . Please tell us as soon as possible so we can offer the appointment to another patient. Please bring along your childs red book (personal child health record) to your appointment. If your child has already been diagnosed with diabetes and is coming to us for the first time, please bring all the equipment your child uses such as: It is also helpful to bring with you a list of any other medicines your child is using. Good diabetes care needs the skills of different specialist staff.You and your child may be seen by a doctor, specialist diabetes nurse, dietitian and psychologist (known as a multi-disciplinary team). This team will see you and your child at leastfour times per year.Other appointments and tests may also be necessary.We may also contact you by telephone or email, if you have given us your permission. It is very important that you bring all your childs glucose meters to every appointment. As we are a teaching hospital, students and visitors may be observing the team.We will always ask your permission for them to observe your appointment. After your childs appointment, we will send a letter to your GP or the doctor who referred you to us.We will also Continue reading >>

Ttype 2 Diabetes In Adultsype 2 Diabetes In Adults

Ttype 2 Diabetes In Adultsype 2 Diabetes In Adults

Information for the public About this informationAbout this information NICE guidelines proNICE guidelines provide advice on the care and support that should be offered to people whovide advice on the care and support that should be offered to people who use health and care services.use health and care services. This information explains the advice about type 2 diabetes in adults that is set out in NICE guideline NG28. This is an update of advice on type 2 diabetes in adults that NICE produced in 2009, and replaces it. Does this information apply to me? Yes, if you are an adult (18 or over) with type 2 diabetes. What is typeWhat is type 2 diabetes?2 diabetes? People with diabetes have too much glucose (sugar) in their blood. There are 2 main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is the most common: 9 out of 10 people who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. It usually starts after the age of 40, but it can affect younger people as well. The body produces a hormone called insulin, which controls how much glucose is in the blood. In type 2 diabetes the body doesn't produce enough insulin, so blood glucose levels become too high. People with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of problems with their blood vessels and heart (cardiovascular disease). This means that they have an increased risk of having angina, a heart © NICE 2015. All rights reserved. Page 1 of 18 attack or a stroke, especially if they have high blood pressure and high cholesterol. People with type 2 diabetes also have an increased risk of other long-term health problems. These include conditions affecting the eyes, feet, nerves and kidneys. If you have type 2 diabetes it is important to keep your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible and to have a healthy lifestyle, to re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Appointment Checklist - Be Prepared

Diabetes Appointment Checklist - Be Prepared

Retrieving and reviewing your own blood work results online (if available) Writing down your diabetes-related goals and objectives Writing down any questions you may want to ask at your appointment Keeping a record of who all the current members of your diabetes care team are Setting your next diabetes check up appointment Making Your Diabetes-Focused Checkup Appointment - Most people with diabetes should see their family doctor/health care team for a diabetes-focused checkup appointment once every three months. This coincides with the frequency of a common diabetes blood test (A1C) that helps you and your medical team to see how your overall diabetes management is going, and is also a common frequency for prescription medications to be due for a renewal or a refill. Clarify the Reason for Your Appointment - When scheduling your diabetes-focused checkup appointment, be clear that the reason you are requesting the appointment is to review and discuss your diabetes. Blood Work Requisitions - If you had received any blood work requisitions, be sure to have them completed in time for the results to be available to both you and your doctor. Unless instructed otherwise by your health care provider, you should have your blood work completed at least two days before your appointment to ensure enough time has passed for the results to be available to your health care team. Clarify Which Blood Tests You Need Done - If you were not provided any blood work requisitions at your last appointment, ask which blood tests you should have completed specific to your diabetes at the time you schedule the appointment, and ask to have the requisitions either sent directly to the lab, or made available for you to pick up. Typically, you should expect to have blood work completed that will mea Continue reading >>

What To Expect At Your First Visit

What To Expect At Your First Visit

During your first visit at Virginia Mason, your doctor will discuss with you and document information about your condition, including: Your medical history, covering your diabetes date of diagnosis, type, previous treatment and diabetes education Dietary habits and nutritional information Medications you use to control blood glucose levels as well as those used to treat other conditions The status of your current treatment program, with a review of the results of self-blood glucose monitoring, frequency of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar reactions) and episodes of high blood sugar, such as ketoacidosis Chronic complications and recommended treatments for problems with infections, eyes, heart, kidneys, nerves, sexual function and poor circulation to the legs and brain Risk factors for hardening of the arteries, such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and family history Psychological and social factors influencing your diabetes care Laboratory tests include blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin or A1c (a blood test that assesses blood glucose control for the past three months), cholesterol, kidney function, urinalysis and, in adults, a cardiogram.Finally, your medical provider will develop with you a plan for managing your diabetes. This plan will include: A complete list of medications used to treat diabetes, blood pressure, high cholesterol and other conditions A referral for an individualized meal plan developed by a dietitian Recommended education by a certified diabetes educator for both you and family members Self-blood glucose monitoring instructions and insulin injection instructions, if applicable Referral to an eye doctor for an exam if you are over age 30 or if you have had diabetes for five years or more For women of childbearing age, a dis Continue reading >>

First Trimester With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

First Trimester With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

First trimester with type 1 or 2 diabetes If you have type 1/2 diabetes in the first trimester you will be referred to the joint diabetes and antenatal clinic. If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes visit your GP or your antenatal diabetes team as soon as you suspect you may be pregnant. You can expect to be referred to the joint diabetes and antenatal clinic immediately, or by ten weeks at latest. Your first scan should take place at 7-9 weeks. If you had not been seeing the preconception team, the team should give you the full range of information and advice and take a clinical history to check your risk of diabetes-related complications . You will also have your HbA1c tested. This may be checked later in your pregnancy too, to assess your level of risk. The team will check your medication to see if you need to switch to a different type now you are pregnant. If you have not had your eyes and kidneys checked in the past year, you will need to be assessed at this stage. This is because you are at higher risk of eye and kidney problems during pregnancy. 'Id been told that it would be a bad idea to get pregnant because Id had early-stage retinopathy, but then I fell pregnant by accident. I had some laser treatment, but it came back towards the end of my second pregnancy.' From this point onwards, you will have appointments every 1-2 weeks. You will have regular ultrasound scans to check how your baby is growing, and will also have regular Hb1Ac tests, blood pressure and urine samples. Throughout your pregnancy you are at increased risk of hypos if you are treated with insulin, but you may be less sensitive to hypos than usual (hypo unawareness), so you need to make sure you are always prepared with handy hypo treatments such as glucose-containing drinks. You may be prescribed Continue reading >>

Planning For A Successful Doctors Visit

Planning For A Successful Doctors Visit

You have canceled your last two appointments with your doctor, but now the pharmacy says you need to have new prescriptions for your diabetes supplies and medicines. You cant put it off any longer: Its time to see your doctor about your diabetes. But this time, maybe things can be different: Maybe you can view your doctor appointment as an opportunity to get your questions answered and to get help with your diabetes care rather than as an obligatory meeting youve come to dread. Here are some tips for how to get what you need from your doctor visits for diabetes care: First, schedule your appointments at times that are good for you. Do you tend to try to squeeze them in between picking up groceries and picking up the kids? Is there a big deadline approaching at work the day before your appointment? Your diabetes appointments are just about you, and they deserve your undivided attention. Try to make each session with your doctor or other health-care provider a time when you are not rushed, preoccupied, or multitasking. Turn off your cell phone during the appointment so you dont get distracted. Start thinking ahead of time about what you want to ask or talk about at your appointment. A lot can go on between visits, and it can be difficult to remember everything you want to bring up. So keep a small notebook handy, and write down your questions and concerns as they come up. ( Click here for a list of helpful questions to ask at your appointment.) Plan on telling your doctor about any major changes in your life or your daily schedule, such as starting a new job or traveling more than usual. Changes such as these and even more minor changes can affect your blood glucose levels. Review your notebook one month, one week, and again one day before your appointment to make sure y Continue reading >>

What Happens During Your Doctor Visit?

What Happens During Your Doctor Visit?

I was recently diagnosed T2 during a hospital visit for something unrelated and I was put on Metformin. I have a doctor's appointment this afternoon, my first real appointment since being diagnosed, and I was just wondering what I should expect. I'm bringing lab work from the hospital, as well as my blood sugar monitor to show the progress I've been making with diet, exercise, and medication. Other than being weighed and having my blood pressure taken, what should I expect? Will I have my blood taken again? Will I have to undergo a physical? What happened to all of you? Did you have an A1C done when they did your other lab work? If not the doctor may do that to get a rough starting point for comparison. At my Endo and GP office these are done through fingerstick and take about 5 minutes. The doctor may go over your lab results and look at the numbers on your meter to see how you're doing. They could discuss diet and maybe recommend a dietician. All doctors are different in how they handle their patients. Good luck and keep us posted on your visit. Cozmore pump Started 3/22/07 using Novolog D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin This is something that really varies by doctor. It depends on how knowledgeable your doctor is about diabetes, for one thing. If they were going to take a blood sugar test, they would probably tell you not to eat X number of hours before the test, but otherwise it's certainly possible they would take blood and/or urine. I doubt they would take a complete physical unless you asked for it, but again it does vary by doctor. You might phone the doctor's office and ask a nurse there what to expect if it is really worrying you. Is this a new doctor? You don't have a regular GP? D.D. Family T2 on meds since Feb 04; high bgl since May Continue reading >>

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