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Final Stages Of Dog Diabetes

Of Diabetes In Dogs?

Of Diabetes In Dogs?

Learn the symptoms of diabetes in dogs and keep your cute Cocker safe! Some signs are easier to spot than others, but at least if you know what you're looking for, you'll be heading in the right direction! How To Tell If Your Dog Has Diabetes If you miss the early symptoms of diabetes in dogs, this disease will continue on its silent but life-threatening journey until the more obvious symptoms of the illness become visible. It's helpful to understand the signs that may suggest your dog has diabetes because it is a serious illness. If this condition isn't untreated it can cause kidney failure, liver and bladder problems, deterioration of his eyesight (including loss of vision) and a susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. At the very worst, your pet could slip into a coma and death could quickly follow. Now that I've got your attention, I'd just like to re-assure you that having a dog with diabetes is not the end of the world. It is treatable and your dog can go on to have the same quality of life as before, he'll just need a little more TLC! Learn more about dog diabetes here, and then come back here to continue reading to discover the classic symptoms of diabetes in dogs. Dog Diabetes Symptoms: Early Stages Symptoms seen typically in the early stages are: Extreme Thirst and Excessive Urination: This is usually one of the first visible symptoms of diabetes in dogs. Increased sugar levels in the blood cause the kidneys to flush the glucose from the body via the urine and (because he's peeing all the time) this can lead to de-hydration. Your dog is constantly thirsty and drinks more and more water, he then needs to pee again...and so it goes on! If your Spaniel is left alone during the day and you come home to unexpected 'little puddles' on the floor...that jus Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Canine Diabetes

Signs And Symptoms Of Canine Diabetes

Diabetes in dogs is becoming more of an issue than most people think. Because of the increasing incidence of this, there are a few things that you need to monitor your dog for to know whether or not he might have canine diabetes. These symptoms aren’t specific only to diabetes, but may also signal some other health issues that may need your attention. As always, when in doubt, visit your veterinarian to get a thorough exam. Canine diabetes is a condition in the endocrine system triggered by a deficiency of insulin, or it could also be caused by the body’s inability to respond to this hormone. Studies show that 1 out of every 400 dogs will develop diabetes. This condition could develop as a result of genetics, others have it as an aftermath of other diseases which damaged the pancreas, or it could be a congenital condition. It has also been shown that obesity can be a contributing factor. Although canine diabetes can affect any breed of dog, any age or sex, female dogs are more susceptible and this is especially true when they reach 6 to 9 years old. Some breeds are also more prone to diabetes, particularly Beagles, Samoyeds, and Terriers. There is currently no real cure for diabetes. However, there are some treatments that can be given to manage this disease effectively. Some of them include the administration of insulin injections, oral medication, and managing diet and exercise. Your veterinarian may choose to use any one of or a combination of these treatments. If you happen to notice that your dog has started to drink more water than it normally does, this could be an indicator that they have diabetes. Dogs that drink more water than usual could be showing signs of high blood sugar and they are trying to flush the excess glucose with the water. With excessive wa Continue reading >>

Five Stages Of Evolving Beta-cell Dysfunction During Progression To Diabetes

Five Stages Of Evolving Beta-cell Dysfunction During Progression To Diabetes

This article proposes five stages in the progression of diabetes, each of which is characterized by different changes in β-cell mass, phenotype, and function. Stage 1 is compensation: insulin secretion increases to maintain normoglycemia in the face of insulin resistance and/or decreasing β-cell mass. This stage is characterized by maintenance of differentiated function with intact acute glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Stage 2 occurs when glucose levels start to rise, reaching ∼5.0–6.5 mmol/l; this is a stable state of β-cell adaptation with loss of β-cell mass and disruption of function as evidenced by diminished GSIS and β-cell dedifferentiation. Stage 3 is a transient unstable period of early decompensation in which glucose levels rise relatively rapidly to the frank diabetes of stage 4, which is characterized as stable decompensation with more severe β-cell dedifferentiation. Finally, stage 5 is characterized by severe decompensation representing a profound reduction in β-cell mass with progression to ketosis. Movement across stages 1–4 can be in either direction. For example, individuals with treated type 2 diabetes can move from stage 4 to stage 1 or stage 2. For type 1 diabetes, as remission develops, progression from stage 4 to stage 2 is typically found. Delineation of these stages provides insight into the pathophysiology of both progression and remission of diabetes. STAGE 1: COMPENSATION The most common example of compensation is found with the insulin resistance due to obesity, which is accompanied by higher overall rates of insulin secretion (2) and increased acute glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) following an intravenous glucose challenge (3). Much of the increase in insulin secretion undoubtedly results from an increa Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

Symptoms And Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

How Diabetes Affects Dogs There are two types of canine diabetes – diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Of these, diabetes mellitus – particularly Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus - is by far the most common. In healthy animals, insulin is produced and released by specialized cells in the pancreas. Insulin is needed for glucose from ingested food to pass into cells and tissues, where it can be processed and used for energy. Dogs with Type 1 diabetes mellitus do not have enough insulin in their blood streams, because their specialized pancreatic cells are either absent or not functioning normally. This prevents them from properly metabolizing dietary sugar, which in turn causes abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) and levels of glucose in their urine (glycosuria). Dogs with excess urinary glucose tend to excrete very large amounts of urine, leading to dehydration and unusual thirst. The metabolic abnormalities associated with diabetes mellitus initially increase a dog’s appetite because its cells are unable to take in and use dietary sugars. This is called “going into starvation mode.” The dog’s body starts breaking down stored fat for energy. This causes certain acid byproducts of fat metabolism called “ketones” to build up in the blood. Ultimately, this can cause a very serious and life-threatening condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis. Disruption of the complex metabolic system can lead to a number of different symptoms. While many of these are vague and non-specific, taken together they can suggest the presence of diabetes mellitus and may help owners and veterinarians arrive at an early diagnosis. Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs Owners of dogs with diabetes mellitus may notice one or more of the following signs in thei Continue reading >>

How To Treat Pancreatitis In Dogs

How To Treat Pancreatitis In Dogs

How do we keep this site running? This post may contain affiliate links — the cost is the same to you, but we get a referral fee. Compensation does not affect rankings. Thanks! Pancreatitis, or inflammation and swelling of the pancreas, is a painful and seldom-understood affliction that affects dogs worldwide. While spontaneous canine pancreatitis is not particularly well understood, veterinarians do have an idea of the causes that contribute to this condition, its related conditions and symptoms, and treatment methods to lessen symptoms. Navigate to the section of the article that interests you: What is Pancreatitis? Predisposition What Is Pancreatitis in Dogs? The term pancreatitis refers to the general condition of inflammation and swelling of the pancreas. There are two degrees of pancreatitis in dogs recognized by the veterinary community: mild and severe. There are also two variations of pancreatitis that describe the length of time which your dog has suffered from the condition: acute and chronic. Acute pancreatitis is when the condition is sudden in onset, and there is no previous sign of the condition existing. Chronic pancreatitis is when pancreatitis occurs over a period of time. When the condition occurs suddenly in a dog, it takes many owners by surprise, and it can also cause a considerable amount of pain for the affected dog. The pancreas is a small organ shaped like the letter ‘V,’ sitting directly behind the stomach and the small intestine. The pancreas is responsible for producing specific enzymes that are used to promote digestion and enable the body to absorb fats in food. Without the pancreas, dogs would have no way to absorb nutrients from food. Symptoms of Mild Pancreatitis There are quite a few different symptoms of pancreatitis, and not al Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Learn More About Types, Symptoms And Possible Treatments

Diabetes In Dogs: Learn More About Types, Symptoms And Possible Treatments

Does your dog look depressed or nauseated recently? Does he urinate more often? The chances are you need to check your dog’s blood sugar levels! Diabetes in dogs is one of the most common medical conditions that older dogs develop in their lives. Just like diabetes in humans, the same condition is manageable and treatable in dogs, with necessary care. 5 Worst Arthritis Foods Limit these foods to decrease arthritis pain and inflammation. naturalhealthreports.net With negligence, the complexity of the matter increases to develop into deadlier diseases. With due awareness, information, tests and professional assistance of a veterinarian, you can help your diabetic dog to be happy, healthy and energetic! What does diabetes in dogs mean? The complex situation of diabetes is, caused due to an imbalance in the production or absorption of the hormone insulin in the body. The sickness or onset of illness happens either because there is insufficient insulin in the dog’s body or due to the dog’s abnormal response to insulin. For a healthy digestion to occur in a dog, the food should be broken down into the tiniest levels of that of the glucose, which then is absorbed by the cells with the help of adequate secretion of insulin in the dog’s body. When the pancreas do not produce sufficient insulin required for digestion, the level of blood sugar in the dog’s blood increases. The subsequent medical condition is hypoglycaemia or low blood sugar in the body. This is diabetes mellitus in a dog. Types of diabetes in dogs Diabetes Mellitus is a diseases condition where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin for the body’s needs. There are varieties of diabetes in dogs that is similar to the diabetes in human diagnosis of the same, the Type I and the Type II diabetes. Typ Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs: Symptoms, Treatment & Life Expectancy

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs: Symptoms, Treatment & Life Expectancy

This lesson teaches you about a disorder dogs can experience, called diabetes insipidus. You'll learn its definition, causes, signs, symptoms, treatment options, as well as some prognoses. What Is Diabetes Insipidus? Imagine that all day and every day you have extreme thirst followed up by an urge to urinate large volumes of urine on a frequent basis. This can happen with a condition called diabetes insipidus, in both humans and dogs. This uncommon disorder occurs when the brain either secretes an insufficient amount of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or the kidneys don't respond to it. ADH tells the kidneys to stop making urine and to start preserving water within the body. Let's learn about the signs, treatments, and life expectancy surrounding this condition in dogs. Signs & Symptoms If the brain doesn't make enough ADH or the kidneys pay no attention to it, the kidneys will make a lot of urine and deplete the body of lots of water as a result. And what happens when you are dehydrated? You drink a lot! Thus, it should be no surprise that diabetes insipidus in the dog will lead to: Polydipsia 'Poly-' means many or much and '-dipsia' refers to a condition of thirst. Thus, the dog will feel extremely thirsty and, as a result, polydipsia will also manifest itself via the consumption of large amounts of liquids over and over again. Polyuria, where '-uria' refers to a condition of the urine. Polyuria manifests itself as an abnormally excessive passage of urine (volume-wise). The dog may also have to go to the bathroom more frequently as well. Inappropriate urination within the home, if the dog is not walked frequently enough. Disorientation, extreme lethargy and/or lack of mobility, ataxia (stumbling around as if drunk), seizures, and death can occur if a dog's Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms That A Diabetic Dog Is Dying?

What Are The Symptoms That A Diabetic Dog Is Dying?

That is pretty good. As long as you've the diabetes under control there shouldn't be many symptoms at all. The problems occur when the blood sugar goes high for a persistent period and the insulin stops working. A persistently high blood sugar leads to weight loss and can progress to ketoacidosis. It is a buildup of ketones in the blood that causes severe illness with lack of appetite, vomiting, and lethargy. It is life threatening unless is it brought under control with medications and fluids. A persistently high glucose can also cause weakness as well as neurologic symptoms like seizures, stumbling and confusion. If you have more questions please reply back. Ask your own question now Continue reading >>

Canine Gestational Diabetes

Canine Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes can affect both people and dogs. Although not common, it can be fatal to the pregnant bitch. Breeders, learn cause, symptoms, and treatment! 2011 report: Canine Gestational Diabetes occurs so rarely that it's entirely possible for a dog breeder to spend decades breeding and raising their dogs without being aware that this could be a potential problem. Most dog owners are unaware of the occurrence of diabetes in dogs at all, unless they or a close friend happens to own a diabetic dog. Left undiagnosed and untreated, Canine Gestational Diabetes can become fatal, so it is a factor that dog breeders need to be aware of. Canine Gestational Diabetes occurs when a bitch is pregnant and her body either does not produce sufficient insulin, or cannot use what insulin it does produce correctly. Our dogs' cells are fueled by a sugar called glucose. The body obtains glucose by breaking down carbohydrates in the dog's diet. The dog's cells then extract glucose from the dog's blood through the use of insulin. The Glucose – Insulin – Diabetes Connection Insulin is one of several hormones produced by a dog's pancreas by certain specialized cells within the pancreas. Should a bitch develop Canine Gestational Diabetes, her cells are unable to take in enough glucose. That glucose then begins to build up in her blood stream, and her cells begin to "starve" from the lack of the glucose that they require to function normally. Her internal organs begin to suffer damage from her sugary blood, and her inability to break down and use glucose causes sugar to begin to appear in her urine. From what I have been able to find while researching this condition, there seem to be a variety of mechanisms during any pregnancy which can cause insulin resistance, which also suppresses Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older Dogs

Diabetes In Older Dogs

Most often, diabetes in older dogs is identified as Diabetes Mellitus, and happens because your dog's pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Dog diabetes is similar to human diabetes in some ways, and different in others. If you want to make a comparison, you'll find that canine diabetes is somewhat like Type I diabetes in humans. Canine Diabetes Mellitus is usually not seen in younger dogs (those less than 4 or 5 years old), and symptoms most often become noticeable in dogs who are considered to be middle-aged or older. It's also more common in female dogs than in males, and unspayed females are more at risk than spayed females. As with many diseases, some purebred dogs seem to have a predisposition to developing Diabetes during their lifetime. Dog breeds who have an above-average chance of developing canine diabetes include (but may not be limited to): Alaskan Malamute Australian Terrier Beagle Bichon Frise Cairn Terrier Chow Chow Dachshund Doberman Finnish Spitz Fox Terrier Golden Retriever Keeshond Miniature Pinscher Old English Sheepdog Poodle Pug Puli Samoyed Schnauzer Springer Spaniel West Highland Terrier Yorkshire Terrier Mixed breed dogs may be less likely to become diabetic, but they are not immune to developing the disease. Canine Diabetes is not very common, but it is on the rise (as it is in humans). Although there are no firm stats on the incidence of diabetes in dogs, estimates range from between 1 in 100 to 1 in 500 dogs being affected (at max that is 1% of all dogs). However, studies show that over the past five years, there has been an increase of over 30% in the number of dogs being diagnosed with diabetes. Fortunately diabetes is a very treatable condition and diabetic dogs can still live happy, act Continue reading >>

When To Put A Dog To Sleep

When To Put A Dog To Sleep

A dog owner's toughest decision revealed Working at a veterinarian hospital, I inevitably received those dreadful phone calls from owners asking if it was time to put their beloved dog to sleep. Unfortunately, I was never able to give them that straight heart-aching, black or white answer they were ultimately craving for. As I listened to them compassionately, in the midst of their sobbing for help, I always faithfully stuck to my personal opinion that as owners, it was their ultimate choice since they knew their dog best, having lived and rejoiced with him or her for so many years. I always advised the "It's all about quality of life" philosophy and suggested them to rationally check if their dog had more bad days than good. These were those compassionate owners truly concerned about their dog's over all wellbeing. They were trying their best to cope with the idea that their dog's life was coming shortly to an end and were gathering their emotional forces to be prepared for their final day. These were clients dealing with their pet's chronic diseases for years and willing to do all that could have been possibly done to help their pet manage sickness as comfortably as possible. When their dog's days were getting close to an end, as veterinary staff, we suffered as well, since we have seen these dogs for many years and grew emotionally attached to them. We found ourselves in tears many times, hugging the owners as the pain and sorrow seemed to seep deep into the animal clinic... When to Put Dog to Sleep? As dog owners, we all would love if our dogs could live much longer lives. For some occult reason, when dogs turn geriatric, it just feels as if their lives have come to an end too soon, and way too too abruptly. The years spent together seem to have passed much too quic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Animals Affected Dogs Overview Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a serious disease of dogs. The main characteristic of diabetes is an inability to control the level of sugar in the blood. This leads to chronically high blood sugar levels, which in turn lead to the symptoms of the disease. Management of diabetes in dogs is challenging but possible. With proper treatment, many diabetic dogs lead essentially normal lives. However, without treatment the disease inevitably leads to serious complications. Diabetes in dogs is similar to type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes in humans. Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Weight loss Normal or increased appetite in the early stages of the disease; appetite may decline in the later stages. Lethargy A sudden change in the appearance of the eyes due to the formation of cataracts. In the end stages of the disease, coma and death Risk Factors and Prevention A genetic or hereditary predisposition to diabetes appears to be a primary risk factor. Dogs that suffer from one or multiple bouts of pancreatitis may develop diabetes as a consequence of damage to the pancreas. Dogs aged 4 - 14 years are at highest risk of pancreatitis. Female dogs are diagnosed with diabetes more often than males. Miniature Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, Samoyeds, and Toy Poodles suffer diabetes at higher rates than other breeds. Syndromes such as Cushing's disease and periodontal disease predispose dogs to diabetes. Complications Untreated diabetes leads to emaciation, chronic lethargy and weakness. Diabetic dogs are prone to urinary tract infections. House soiling may occur as well, due to increased frequency of urination. Insulin administration is the main method of treating diabetes in dogs. However, some dogs may suffer from accidental ov Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

Managing Life Expectancy For Dogs With Renal Failure

Managing Life Expectancy For Dogs With Renal Failure

Managing Life Expectancy for Dogs With Renal Failure By Cate Burnette | Updated September 26, 2017 Canine renal failure is invariably irreversible and progressive, according to the Merck Veterinary Manual. Veterinary and at-home treatment is considered to be palliative--designed to alleviate the symptoms of the illness and provide comfort for the lifetime of the animal. The prognosis for renal failure patients is poor, but individualized veterinary and at-home treatment will allow many dogs to live out their days in relative comfort. Dogs are normally asymptomatic until the disease is fairly far advanced, according to Dr. Alleice Summers in her book Common Diseases of Companion Animals. Canine renal failure is not usually discovered in its early stages because clinical signs, including elevated creatinine and urea nitrogen levels, are not detected in blood tests until approximately 75 percent of kidney function has been compromised. By the time of diagnosis, most animals show symptoms of increased urination and loss of urine concentration (meaning the kidneys are no longer removing the normal amount of toxins from the body). The increase in urination causes dehydration and metabolic imbalances resulting in gastrointestinal distress, vomiting and diarrhea in the patient. Veterinary treatment to alleviate the dogs unease during this time may include administration of intravenous fluids, anti-emetic and anti-diarrhea medications. Dog owners will commonly start their animals on a low-protein, low-sodium diet to increase kidney function while at home. Veterinary personnel recommend teaching owners how to administer subcutaneous fluids to their pets in order to continue necessary hydration during the time the patient is not in hospital. The progression of renal failure cause Continue reading >>

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Diabetes Mellitus Related terms: Canine diabetes mellitus, DM, Diabetic Ketoacidosis VeNom term: Diabetes mellitus (VeNom code: 658). Related conditions: Cataract, Pancreatitis, Hyperadrenocorticism Outline: Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder that occurs when there is a failure to adequately control blood sugar levels. Dogs that have the condition are unable to use blood sugar as an energy source for the cells in their body as they would normally, and therefore the level of sugar in the blood increases. The most common signs of diabetes mellitus are excessive thirst and urination with weight loss. The onset of diabetes mellitus occurs most commonly in middle aged or older dogs. Left untreated, diabetes mellitus can lead to complications including a severe illness called diabetic ketoacidosis where the body begins to break down body tissue, such as fats and muscle, to use as a source of energy in place of blood sugars. This process produces toxins that can cause dehydration, nausea and vomiting and can be life-threatening if left untreated. Diabetic dogs are generally reliant on dietary management and daily injections of the hormone insulin for the rest of their lives. There is evidence of a genetic basis for the development of diabetes mellitus, and the Yorkshire terrier dog breed has been shown to be at increased risk of the condition compared with the general dog population. Summary of Information (for more information click on the links below) 1. Brief description Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder which results in high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Glucose is an important source of energy in the body. In animals that are diabetic, the cells in the body are unable to absorb glucose properly, and this leads to an increase in the blood. In dogs, t Continue reading >>

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