diabetestalk.net

Field Peas Diabetes

Peas Please? Can I Eat Peas On A Kidney Friendly Diet?

Peas Please? Can I Eat Peas On A Kidney Friendly Diet?

Peas please? Can I eat peas on a kidney friendly diet? Posted September 30, 2010 in FAQ , Tags: Kidney Diet , pea recipes , peas , phosphorus in peas , potassium in peas , protein in peas by Sara Colman, RD, CDE. Peas are eaten around the world. They come in many varietiesblack-eyed peas(cow peas), chickpeas (garbanzo beans), green peas, pea pods, pigeon peas (red gram)and split green peas. I especially like green peas made into a salad or stuck to mashed potatoes when eating the two together. A recent inquiry I received from a DaVita.com visitorasked Whats the best kind of peas to eat on my renal diet ? You may see mature peas listed on the Limit or Avoid kidney diet food list andgreen peas and pea pods may be on the Allowed list.Why? Generally any mature bean or pea contains a large amount of potassium and phosphorus . Since people on dialysis and those with later stage kidney disease must limit these minerals, peas are one of the foods that deserve special consideration in kidney diet meal plannning. The chart below lists different varieties of peas and the nutrients of concern. By comparing varieties you can see fresh pea pods are a good choice, followed by fresh green peas because these are lowest in potassium and phosphorus. Mature peas have the greatest mineral content. Notice the big difference in protein content for peas. Eating adequate amounts of protein while controlling phosphorus is important for stage 5 kidney patients on dialysis. For vegetarians on dialysis, mature peas may provide a significant amount of protein toward their daily goal. Another way to assessvalue of a food fora dialysis dietis to look at the phosphorus to protein ratio. As shown in the chart above some of the pea choices have a higher protein level. By looking at the phosphorus to pro Continue reading >>

What Are Good Foods To Eat On A Diabetic Diet?

What Are Good Foods To Eat On A Diabetic Diet?

Your diabetes-friendly shopping list should include: Vegetables Tip: These nonstarchy veggies can fill the "produce" portion of your plate: Artichokes Asparagus Beets Bell peppers Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cauliflower Carrots Celery Cucumber Eggplant Green beans Jicama Leafy greens Leeks, onions Mushrooms Snow peas Summer squash Tomatoes Zucchini Tip: These starchy veggies can fill the "starch" section of your plate: Corn Green peas Parsnips Potatoes Winter squash Fruit Tip: Opt for fresh, and avoid added sugars if you go with canned or frozen instead. Apples Apricots Berries Bananas Cherries Citrus fruit Grapes Kiwifruit Mangoes Melons Nectarines Peaches Pears Pineapple Plums Seasonings Tip: Research suggests cinnamon, cloves, and allspice may have a stabilizing effect on blood sugar. Fresh herbs (rosemary, basil, mint, cilantro, chives, dill, etc.) Low-sodium spices Vinegars (cider, red wine, rice wine, etc.) For the most part, nutrition guidelines for people with diabetes match what everyone should be doing for their health. You need a balanced diet to get the nutrients you need for good health. (Yes, your mom was right.) Since you have diabetes, this balancing act is even more important -- you need to balance food choices with other parts of your treatment, like your medication and exercise plan. Learning a few basics (like those below) can help you do this. Build a better diet with these 6 basic building blocks: Choose unsaturated fats and oils rather than saturated or trans fats. Include more vegetables and whole fruits in your meals -- they're full of fiber and vitamins. Eat more whole grains like whole-wheat bread, brown rice, and oatmeal. Choose heart-healthy proteins like beans, skinless poultry, and lean meat. Select low-fat dairy products most of the time. L Continue reading >>

Pass Those Peas, Please

Pass Those Peas, Please

Peas have never been a favorite vegetable for most kids, especially if the peas come from a can. But now that you’re older, hopefully you’ve cultivated a taste for this powerhouse food. And with spring finally here, it’s time to lighten up your palate and enjoy a vegetable that has plenty to offer in the way of nutrition. A bit of pea history… The peas that we eat today are thought to originate from Central Asia and the Middle East and may have been one of the first crops grown by humans. Peas were probably originally consumed in their dry form; it wasn’t until about the 16th century that they were eaten fresh. Canada is the largest producer and exporter of peas, but the United States, France, China, Russia, and India are big producers, as well. Peas belong to the legume family, which means that they’re close cousins of black beans, lentils, and chickpeas. However, green peas are one of the few legumes that are eaten fresh as well as dried. Nutrition facts If you have diabetes, you’ve probably been taught that peas belong to the “starchy vegetable” category, unlike, say, green beans or broccoli, which are considered “nonstarchy vegetables.” Peas do contain more carbohydrate than some other vegetables, and therefore are generally counted as a carb choice per serving at a meal. Here’s the nutrition breakdown of a half-cup serving of peas: • 62 calories • 11 grams of carb • 4 grams of protein • 0 grams of fat • 4 grams of fiber Although peas have more carbohydrate than some other vegetables, don’t let that discourage you from eating them. Read on to learn how peas can give your health a boost. Health benefits of peas Once thought of as a lowly vegetable, peas have come into their own lately. Here are some of the benefits that peas have t Continue reading >>

Dried Peas

Dried Peas

When fresh peas are not available or when you want to enjoy a starchier, hardier flavored legume, dried peas are the perfect choice; they are available any time of the year. Although they belong to the same family as beans and lentils, they are usually distinguished as a separate group because of the ways in which they are prepared. The different types of peas are all spherical, a feature that also sets them apart from beans and lentils. Dried peas are produced by harvesting the peapods when they are fully mature and then drying them. Once they are dried and the skins removed, they split naturally. Calories: 231 GI: low NutrientDRI/DV Health Benefits Dried peas, a small but nutritionally mighty member of the legume family, are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber. Not only can dried peas help lower cholesterol, they are also of special benefit in managing blood-sugar disorders since their high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising rapidly after a meal. Fiber is far from all that dried peas have to offer. Dried peas also provide good to excellent amounts of five important minerals, three B-vitamins, and protein—all with virtually no fat. As if this weren't enough, dried peas also feature isoflavones (notably daidzein). Isoflavones are phytonutrients that can act like weak estrogens in the body and whose dietary consumption has been linked to a reduced risk of certain health conditions, including breast and prostate cancer. Dried Peas are Packed with Fiber Check a chart of the fiber content in foods and you'll see legumes leading the pack. Dried peas, like other legumes, are rich in soluble fiber. Soluble fiber forms a gel-like substance in the digestive tract that binds bile (which contains cholesterol) and carries it out of the body. Resear Continue reading >>

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

25 Diabetic Foods for Stable Blood Glucose and Overall Health Sticking to a diet of diabetic foods is one natural way to help manage your condition and feel as good as possible all day long. If youre tired of the cycle of eating foods that spike your blood sugar levels, this list will help you avoid those foods and crowd them out with better, more healthy choices. Spinach and kale are very similar to each other in terms of how theyre handled by the body and the amount of nutrition they provide. Diabetics can enjoy as much of either one as they care for, and there really isnt a huge advantage of one over the other. Youll be getting both Vitamin A and Vitamin C from each, as well as potassium, magnesium, and iron. Baby spinach and baby kale are very much alike in terms of usability, each having their own taste which is their major difference. You can use spinach and kale interchangeably in green smoothie recipes, but kale gets the edge in the snack department because its so easy to make kale chips that taste great and wont leave you filled with regret when youre done snacking. If youre looking for some of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet you cant go wrong with spinach and kale. Once for once they provide more vitamins and minerals than just about any other food, including other vegetables and fruit. Beans are a great addition to most any meal because theyll help to stabilize your blood sugar, rather than have a detrimental effect or no effect at all. Foods like this are important because they can help balance out other foods that arent necessarily diabetic-friendly, and they can reduce the amount of insulin needed to bring your levels back to normal. Beans are easy enough to add to a meal, and many recipes call for beans as part of the main dish. You can also Continue reading >>

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus or type-2 diabetes, is one of the major non-communicable and fastest growing public health problems in the world, is a condition difficult to treat and expensive to manage. It has been estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from the current value of about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years.[1,2,3] Individuals with type-2 diabetes are at a high risk of developing a range of debilitating complications such as cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy, changes to the retina and blindness that can lead to disability and premature death. It also imposes important medical and economic burdens. Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences seem to be the most important factors responsible for the development of this condition. However, a drastic increase of physical inactivity, obesity, and type-2 diabetes has been recently observed. The fact indicates that obesity and physical inactivity may constitute the main reasons for the increasing burden of diabetes in the developed world.[4,5,6,7,8,9,10] Fortunately, because environmental factors are modifiable, disease manifestation from these factors is largely preventable. Diet is one of the major factors now linked to a wide range of diseases including diabetes. The amount and type of food consumed is a fundamental determinant of human health. Diet constitutes a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes, which may involve diet alone, diet with oral hypoglycemic drugs, or diet with insulin.[11,12,13,14,15] Diet is individualized depending on age, weight, gender, health condition, and occupation etc. The dietary guidelines as used in this review are sets of advisory statements that give quick dietary advic Continue reading >>

Beans & Diabetes

Beans & Diabetes

Diabetes is becoming more common across the world as the overweight and obesity epidemic continues. Eating a variety of legumes, including beans, as part of a healthful diet may be valuable not only in the prevention but also management of diabetes. Beans are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and protein, which gives them a low glycemic index. This makes them an ideal food for the management of insulin resistance and diabetes. Beans also provide protein that is low in fat and saturated fat as well as important vitamins and minerals in the diet. Numerous studies show that consuming a low glycemic index diet may be protective against developing diabetes, while consuming a high glycemic index/load may increase the risk. Beans are an important food for individuals striving to manage blood sugars. In the Health Professionals Study and Nurses Health Study, a 37-40% increase in Type 2 diabetes was found in individuals with the highest glycemic intake compared to those having the lowest glycemic index intake. (Salmeron & Ascherio, 1997; Salmeron & Manson, 1997) In a cohort from the Nurses Health study II, an increased risk of diabetes was also found in young and middle aged women when comparing highest vs. lowest quintiles for glycemic index. (Schulze, 2004) Krishnan et al (2007) examined differences in glycemic indices and risk of type-2 diabetes with a group of US black women. After 8 years of follow-up, they found a positive association for diabetes in women consuming higher glycemic index diets, which was surprisingly stronger in normal weight women with a BMI <25. In a study of older Australians, researchers reported an increased risk of type-2 diabetes in women < 70 years of age consuming higher glycemic index carbohydrates (Barclay, 2006). Lastly, in a cohort Continue reading >>

Do Green Field Peas Count As Vegetable Or Starch In Diabetic Diet?

Do Green Field Peas Count As Vegetable Or Starch In Diabetic Diet?

The field pea originated in Asia and was one of the first crops cultivated by humans. Not to be confused with the fresh pea, the field pea is a dry pea and includes split peas and black-eyed peas. The green field pea is high in both protein and carbohydrates, and for diabetics counts as a starch, not a vegetable. Video of the Day To help with meal planning and blood sugar control, foods for diabetics are divided into groups based on similarities in nutrient composition, namely carbohydrate, protein and fat content. Starches are foods in which one serving typically contains about 80 calories, 15 g of carbohydrates, 3 g of protein and 0 g of fat. The carb content in foods such as starches can increase blood sugar. Diabetics need to control the amount of carbs they eat throughout the day and at each meal to aid in blood sugar control. For diabetics, vegetables are categorized into two different groups: starchy and nonstarchy vegetables. Nonstarchy vegetables are low in calories and carbs. Typically, one serving of nonstarchy vegetables contains 25 calories, 5 g of carbs, 2 g of protein and 0 g of fat. The American Diabetes Association recommends that as a diabetic, you eat as many nonstarchy vegetables as you want. Starchy vegetables have a higher carb content, and for diabetics are classified as a starch, in which one serving equals 80 calories, 15 g of carbs, 3 g of protein and 0 g of fat. A half-cup serving of cooked green field peas, also known as split peas, contains 114 calories, 20 g of carbs, 8 g of protein and 0 g of fat. Higher in calories and carbs than a traditional serving of starch, the green field pea's nutrient composition more closely resembles a starch than a nonstarchy vegetable. When including green field peas as part of your diet plan, you need to coun Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms Prevent High Blood Sugar Diet Food Peas | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms Prevent High Blood Sugar Diet Food Peas | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2: Add this food to your diet to lower high blood sugar Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Diabetes type 2: Symptoms include fatigue and weight loss The glycemic index identifies foods that increase blood sugar rapidly, said Dr Mohammad Asif, from the GRD Institute of Management & Technology, India. This handy tool allows you to favour foods that have much less effect on blood sugar. Peas and split peas are some of the best legumes for diabetes patients to add to their diet, Asif added. Lentils, beans and non-fat soy products should also be eaten by patients. Diabetes type 2: Peas could help to lower blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Eating a healthy, balanced diet could prevent condition Eating a healthy, balanced diet could help you to prevent type 2 diabetes, the NHS said. Try cutting back on fat, sugar and salt in your diet, while increasing the amount of fibre you eat. If youre overweight, losing weight could also lower your risk of the condition. About one in 17 people have diabetes in the UK. Continue reading >>

Legumes Improve Blood Sugar Control And Reduce Cardiovascular Risk In Diabetics

Legumes Improve Blood Sugar Control And Reduce Cardiovascular Risk In Diabetics

Patients with diabetes may want to think twice when choosing between whole wheat foods and legumes, like beans, chickpeas, and lentils. For patients with diabetes, controlling blood sugar levels is extremely important. Out of control blood sugar levels can lead to serious health problems and sometimes, like with a heart attack, stroke or kidney failure, the damage can’t be undone. Fortunately, there are many ways that diabetics can help control their blood sugar, like through exercise, weight control and diet. And a new study shows that incorporating more legumes into the diet could not only help control blood sugar levels but also reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was published recently in the Archives of Internal Medicine – a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the American Medical Association. Through this study, researchers assigned more than 120 patients with type 2 diabetes to one of two diets. Half of participants were instructed to eat at least 1 cup of legumes, like beans, chickpeas and lentils, a day, while the other half were instructed to eat more whole wheat products. After following patients for 3 months on these diets, researchers found that patients increasing their consumption of legumes had significantly better blood sugar control than patients who increased their intake of whole wheat products. And as mentioned earlier, increased legume intake was also associated with lower blood pressure and cardiovascular risk compared to increased intake of whole wheat products. So what’s the difference between legumes and whole wheat products? The good news is that both are packed with insoluble fiber, which is known to have many health benefits like lowering blood pressure and helping with blood sugar control. Bu Continue reading >>

10 Health Benefits Of Peas

10 Health Benefits Of Peas

Many people think peas are just a poor mans meat or a cheap restaurant side-dish that puts green on your plate. Peas are really little powerhouses of nutrition that are a boon for your health and the whole planet. Read all their benefits, how to use them properly, and some easy recipes. We start with the benefits of this tasty powerfood . Peas are low fat but high everything else. A cup of peas has less than 100 calories but lots of protein, fiber and micro-nutrients. Peas contain high amounts of a health-protective polyphenol called coumestrol. A study in Mexico City determined you only need 2 milligrams per day of this phytonutrient to prevent stomach cancer. A cup of peas has at least 10. 3. Anti-aging, strong immune system, and high energy: This comes from the high levels of anti-oxidants including: phenolic acids = ferulic and caffeic acid 4. Prevention of wrinkles, Alzheimers, arthritis, bronchitis, osteoporosis and candida These come from peas strong anti-inflammatory properties. Excess inflammation has also been linked to, heart disease, cancer, and aging in general. These properties include: Pisumsaponins I and II and pisomosides A and B are anti-inflammatory phytonutrients found almost exclusively in peas. vitamin C and vitamin E, and a good amount of the antioxidant mineral zinc omega-3 fat in the form of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). High fibre slows and protein slows down how fast sugars are digested. The anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatory prevent or reverse insulin resistance (type 2 diabetes) All carbohydrates are natural sugars and starches with no white sugars or chemicals to worry about. The many antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds support healthy blood vessels. The formation of plaque along our blood vessel walls starts with chronic, excessive Continue reading >>

Eat Beans For Better Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Eat Beans For Better Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Beans sometimes get a bum rap. Truth be told, beans boast an amazing number of health benefits. If you have diabetes, beans, and other legumes can help you maintain better control of your blood sugar. What's a legume, you ask? A legume is a plant whose seeds or fruit are found in a long case, called a pod. Beans, chickpeas and lentils are common legumes. Legumes are a low glycemic index food that won't cause sudden spikes in your blood sugar. The glycemic index looks at how fast a carbohydrate-containing food, like beans, raises your blood sugar (glucose) level compared to a baseline product like white bread. Foods low on the index breakdown slowly in the body, so you don't get a sudden rush of sugar into your bloodstream. High glycemic foods (like white rice), on the other hand, get digested more quickly, which can send your blood sugar soaring. Diabetes Superfood Many diabetes nutrition guidelines recommend beans and legumes as part of a healthy diet. In fact, the American Diabetes Association includes them in their list of Diabetes Superfoods. Here's why beans and legumes are so good for you: They provide slowly digested starch (carbohydrate), which reduces blood sugar spikes. They are full of healthy fiber, so they keep you feeling full longer. They're packed with protein, which your body needs to work properly. They are low in fat. Studies show that adding 1 cup (190 grams) of legumes to your daily diet helps lower hemoglobin A1C levels. (That's your average blood sugar level for the last 2-3 months.) Some research hints that eating legumes at breakfast prevents spikes after that meal and subsequent ones that day. And legumes are also good for your heart. A daily dose of beans and legumes can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and coronary ar Continue reading >>

Are Black-eyed Peas High In Carbohydrates?

Are Black-eyed Peas High In Carbohydrates?

Black-eyed peas, as well as other beans and legumes, are rich in both protein and complex carbohydrates. However, it may not be clear how their nutrition fits into your overall dietary needs. Black-eyed peas contain a moderate amount of carbohydrates, and have a low glycemic index. You may eat black-eyed peas as part of a reduced-carbohydrate diet or a diet for diabetes. Nutrition Overview One serving — 1/2 cup or approximately 85 grams — of black-eyed peas contains 70 calories, no fat, 16 grams of carbohydrates and 3 grams of protein. Of the 16 grams of carbohydrates, 4 grams consist of dietary fiber and 3 grams consist of sugars. A serving of black-eyed peas provides you with 5 percent of your recommended intake of carbohydrates, assuming you have a moderately active lifestyle and follow a 2,000-calorie diet. Carbohydrates Your body breaks carbohydrates down into sugars before absorbing them. These sugars, mainly glucose, are the primary source of quick energy for your body. The Centers for Disease Control recommends that 45 percent to 65 percent of your calories come in the form of carbohydrates. For a 2,000-calorie diet, this can range between 200 and 300 grams of carbs daily. The 16 grams in a serving of black-eyed peas make them a source of moderate, but not high, levels of carbs. Dietary Fiber Fiber is indigestible material that passes through your gastrointestinal tract intact. Black-eyed peas contain carbohydrates that your body in unable to break down. Fiber is a polysaccharide – a molecule made from linked sugars – that helps carry waste and excess cholesterol and blood sugar out of your body. MayoClinic.com recommends that adult men consume 38 grams of fiber daily and adult women 25 grams. The 4 grams of dietary fiber in a serving of black-eyed peas Continue reading >>

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

They’re a common part of traditional diets in India and Latin America, but in western repasts, legumes or pulses — that’s lentils, dried beans, and chick peas — have generally been a culinary afterthought. That may soon change, however, thanks to new research suggesting legumes alone can improve the health of diabetics. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicines, was funded in part by an association of legume farmers and confirms that simply changing what they eat can help diabetics reduce some of their symptoms, as well as lower their risk of heart disease — in as little as a few months. MORE: Guide: The 31 Healthiest Foods of All Time (With Recipes) Starting in 2010, researchers in Toronto, Canada, enrolled 121 patients with Type II diabetes and tested their blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and more. Roughly half of the study participants were randomly selected to add a cup of legumes per day to their diet. The other half were told to try to eat more whole-wheat products. After three months, the patients were tested again on the same measures. Both the legume-eaters and the whole-wheat-eaters saw a reduction in their hemoglobin A1c values — a marker of average blood sugar, for a period of several weeks. But that reduction was slightly larger among the legume group than among the whole-what group: 0.5% compared to 0.3%. And while those changes may seem small, the study authors say that drops of this magnitude are “therapeutically meaningful,” and can lead to fewer diabetic symptoms as well as lower doses of medication to control blood sugar levels. The legume-eaters also achieved modest reductions in body weight relative to the wheat group, losing an average of 5.9 lbs compared to 4.4 lbs, as well as drops in total choles Continue reading >>

Eating Smart: Best Foods For The Diabetic

Eating Smart: Best Foods For The Diabetic

In the 1980s, researchers created a special tool that can help diabetics control their blood sugar. It's called the glycemic index, also known as the GI for short. The GI ranks carbohydrate foods according to their effect on blood sugar levels. Carbs that rank high on the GI scale cause blood sugar levels to rise quickly. "Good carbs" that rank lower on the GI scale don’t increase blood sugars as quickly and tend to be better choices. Focusing on carbohydrates can help diabetics eat more healthfully. I am learning that eating certain types of carbs really can make a strong difference in your health. Everyone, diabetics and non-diabetics alike, can improve their health by focusing on eating better carbohydrates at meals and snacks. Eating good carbs may help protect against type 2 diabetes, heart attacks, and even cancer. Choosing healthy carbs may also help you lose weight, which can help fight the epidemic of obesity in our country. I say, ignore those diets that say you should not eat any carbs at all. We need the right carbs for good health! Some carbs make your blood sugar soar really high, while other carbs with a low GI won't raise blood sugar as much. High readings can come from carbs such as white bread, jelly beans and other candies, mashed potatoes, pretzels, stuffing, vanilla wafers, cookies, cakes, pastries, sweets, and desserts. The glycemic index is all about how quickly carbs in foods are broken down and enter the bloodstream. Some carbs, like juice and mashed potatoes, soar into the bloodstream very quickly and can have unhealthy effects on blood sugar. The longer your digestive system has to wrestle with the carb to break it down, the slower the rise in blood sugar. These foods tend to have a low GI. Fiber-rich foods typically have lower GIs because t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes