diabetestalk.net

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes Treatment

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes: Is There A Link?

You ache all over. You’re not sleeping well. You seem to be forgetting things, and your overall mood matches the Grinch who stole Christmas. And you’ve been feeling this way for months. Is it the stress at work? Blood sugar ups and downs? Or something more chronic? While there are many reasons for your symptoms, don’t rule out a condition called fibromyalgia. What is fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder that is associated with pain in the muscles and bones, areas of tenderness, and fatigue. It’s a condition that affects anywhere from 5 to 10 million Americans, but it’s also tough to diagnose because the symptoms are subjective — meaning, there are no tests that can accurately diagnose this disorder. What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia? As mentioned above, symptoms include: • Areas of pain or tenderness at certain places on the body (often called trigger points or tender points • Fatigue • Difficulty sleeping or sleeping for long stretches at a time without feeling rested • Memory issues (“fibro fog”) • Depression • Headaches • Sensitivity to light or sound • Anxiety • Trouble focusing or paying attention • Pain in the abdomen Fibromyalgia can go hand-in-hand with other chronic conditions, too, including: • Irritable bowel syndrome • Interstitial cystitis • Endometriosis • TMJ (temporomandibular joint problems) • Rheumatoid arthritis • Lupus What causes fibromyalgia? Experts aren’t exactly sure what causes fibromyalgia. In fact, until more recently, fibromyalgia was often brushed off by the medical community because it’s so difficult to diagnose and it’s challenging to treat. Fortunately, fibromyalgia is now being taken more seriously. Factors that may “trigger” this condition include: • Physical o Continue reading >>

Do You Also Have Fibromyalgia?

Do You Also Have Fibromyalgia?

I found this on a Fibromyalgia site. I was surprised at all the symptoms and how many that I have. Fibromyalgia Symptoms Checklist You've probably read about fibromyalgia symptoms such as pain, fatigue and fibro fog, but the list of possible signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia are far-reaching and body-wide. The following "monster list" of fibromyalgia symptoms is adapted from one put together by leading fibromyalgia expert Devin Starlanyl. Many of these fibromyalgia symptoms also can be caused by other ailments and this list isn't intended as a diagnostic tool. Knowing the full range of symptoms, however, can help you track them either to help your doctor diagnose you properly or to help you identify triggers. • Learn how doctors diagnose fibromyalgia. • Find a doctor who treats fibromyalgia. Some of the following are noted as overlapping conditions, which means they commonly occur with fibromyalgia but actually are conditions that need to be diagnosed and treated separately. People with fibromyalgia can have any combination of the following symptoms, and to varying degrees of severity. FIBROMYALGIA SYMPTOMS CHECKLIST General Fibromyalgia Symptoms • Delayed reactions to physical exertion or stressful events • Other family members with fibromyalgia (genetic predisposition) • Sweats • Unexplained weight gain or loss • Cravings for carbohydrate and chocolate • Headaches & migraines • Vision changes, including rapidly worsening vision Muscle & Tissue-Related Fibromyalgia Symptoms • Pain that ranges from mild to severe, and may move around the body (See The 7 Types of Fibromyalgia Pain) • Morning stiffness • Muscle twitches • Diffuse swelling • Fibrocystic (lumpy, tender) breasts (as an overlapping condition) Sinus & Allergy-Related Fibromyalgia S Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fibromyalgia: Is There A Link Between The Two?

Diabetes And Fibromyalgia: Is There A Link Between The Two?

It is not a well-known fact that fibromyalgia and diabetes often occur together. Recent medical research shows that keeping your blood sugar levels low also reduces your risk of developing fibromyalgia. A study published in the 2003 edition of Journal Rheumatology International states that about 15% to 18% of patients with diabetes suffer from fibromyalgia too. This strongly suggests that there is a link between these two health conditions. Interestingly, controlling blood sugar levels can also dictate the likelihood of developing fibromyalgia. The connection between both diseases is due to the levels of hemoglobin A1C among diabetic patients. Hemoglobin A1C is blood chemical used to measure how well high your blood sugar was on average during the past 3 months. It was determined that the higher the hemoglobin A1C levels of a diabetic patient is, the more likely he or she will suffer from fibromyalgia. Another link between these two disorders is how they both seem to react to blood sugar levels. An increase of blood glucose also indicates the severity of the symptoms associated with the two health issues. How do I know if I have fibromyalgia? Getting a diagnosis of fibromyalgia can be tricky if you are already dealing with type 2 diabetes. This is due to the fact that diabetes mimics if not all, almost all of the symptoms of fibromyalgia. The only way to get a definitive diagnosis is to seek your doctor’s opinion and get a particular clinical testing on your condition. Be mindful of your body pains and other symptoms you may feel. Published research papers stated that patients, especially females, suffering from diabetes are four times more likely to get fibromyalgia compared to the average population. One unique hint that could point out whether you have this problem Continue reading >>

Is There A Connection Between Fibromyalgia And Diabetes?

Is There A Connection Between Fibromyalgia And Diabetes?

Did you realize that fibromyalgia and diabetes occur almost four times more often than you’d ever dream of expecting? Research has shown that keeping a tight rein on the blood sugar levels of diabetic patients actually greatly reduces the risk of the individual developing fibromyalgia at some point in their lives. A 2003 study done in the journal Rheumatology International, showed that around 15 to 18 percent of diabetic patients also have fibromyalgia. This suggests that there is a link between the two. The Connection between Fibromyalgia and Diabetes The interesting thing about the study done in Rheumatology International was that when it came to a connection between the two, the connection was much stronger in those individuals who had type 1 diabetes than for those that had type 2 diabetes- though the association between fibromyalgia and diabetes was much higher in those with type 2. The reason this association is so interesting is because type 1 diabetes is considered to occur due to an autoimmune disease, though the trigger is not exactly known. Due to the autoimmunity related to type 1 diabetes and the fact that it is strongly associated with fibromyalgia- around 4 times of the population- suggests that those who support that autoimmunity causes fibromyalgia could be headed in the right direction. Of course, before this is officially established, more research must be done. Another very interesting connection between diabetes and fibromyalgia is that controlling blood sugar levels is directly connected with the likelihood of developing fibromyalgia. The higher a diabetic patient’s hemoglobin A1C levels are, the higher their likelihood of suffering from fibromyalgia. The hemoglobin A1C levels are the measure of how well the blood sugar levels are being control Continue reading >>

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes

Fibromyalgia is a condition that leads to symptoms of widespread pain, fatigue, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome etc. There are other symptoms such as cognitive symptoms, non-restorative sleep etc. that lead to a reduced quality of life. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the United States is about 2% with the condition being seven to nine times higher in women than men. Concomitance of fibromyalgia and diabetes There have been studies that have evaluated concomitant conditions occurring with fibromyalgia. One aspect is to look for the association of fibromyalgia with diabetes mellitus. One such study looked at the prevalence of diabetes type 1 and type 2 among patients with fibromyalgia. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own insulin hormone producing cells in the pancreas. A lack of the pancreatic hormone insulin causes blood levels of glucose to be raised. Patients with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections to control their blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is associated with young age and is often called juvenile onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is often called maturity onset diabetes as it occurs in the middle aged and is associated with insulin resistance and increased insulin demand due to factors such as obesity. Fibromyalgia prevalence and other conditions Studies assessing fibromyalgia prevalence and other conditions have found an increased prevalence of fibromyalgia among other autoimmune conditions like Lupus and Sjorgren’s syndrome etc. Fibromyalgia and diabetes It is seen that patients with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with fibromyalgia. In addition, patients who have both fibromyalgia and diabetes tend to have higher levels of HbA1c indicating poorer gluco Continue reading >>

The Energy Disorders: Diabetes, Me/cfs And Fm – Can Diabetes Tell Us Anything About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome And Fibromyalgia?

The Energy Disorders: Diabetes, Me/cfs And Fm – Can Diabetes Tell Us Anything About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome And Fibromyalgia?

Small Fiber Neuropathy In the last year or so we’ve seen four studies published (1,2,3,4) that have found objective evidence of small fiber polyneuropathy in FM patients suggesting that the ‘central sensitization’ theory of FM may be at best incomplete. In fact peripheral nerve damage may be driving pain in FM – but what’s causing the nerve damage? Small fiber neuropathy refers to damage to small myelinated or unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers found in the skin, peripheral nerves and organs. Damage to these fibers can cause sensory changes (numbness, cold, prickling, pins and needles, enhanced pain, abnormal responses to touch, or loss of sensation). Small fiber neuropathy can also cause enteric (digestive) and autonomic dysfunction (5). “Patients often do not identify the relationship of these symptoms to their sensory complaints; however, when asked, they may report dry eyes, dry mouth, postural lightheadedness, presyncope, syncope, abnormal sweating, erectile dysfunction, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, early satiety, difficulty with urinary frequency, nocturia, and/or voiding.” As far as I know ME/CFS patients have yet to be tested for small fiber neuropathy, but many patients complain of widespread pain and allodynia. Several studies have now confirmed autonomic dysfunction in ME/CFS patients, and this may well play a central role in the condition. Small fiber neuropathy isn’t exactly rare, nor is the cause easily identified (5) : “Peripheral neuropathy is an expanding public health problem, seen in nearly 40 million individuals in the United States. Many of these individuals will have specific damage to small myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers, either in isolation or in combination with injury to larger myelinated nerve fibers. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Source: "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Fibromyalgia" (Grand Central 2012) The word hypoglycemia simply means low blood sugar. It’s often used to suggest a disease but it is actually only one symptom of a syndrome with many complaints. This complex would be better defined by the term carbohydrate intolerance. It is expressed by the body’s inability to use certain carbohydrate loads effectively without adverse consequences. When consumed, sugar and complex carbohydrates evoke a rise in blood sugar that triggers insulin release from the pancreas. This hormone facilitates immediate carbohydrate utilization or storage in various parts of the body. The liver converts excesses to fatty acids that are packaged into triglycerides and transported into fat cells for storage. In hypoglycemics, insulin release is either excessive, or the cutoff is inadequate, or insufficiently terminated by counter regulatory hormones. A system‑wide disturbance is created that results in one of the endocrine fatigue syndromes we call hypoglycemia. The standard for diagnosis has been the five-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT). This was designed to document the rise and gradual fall of blood sugar after carbohydrate consumption. A sugar solution is administered and blood samples are drawn at various intervals. The GTT has not been very efficient in detecting the sudden fall of blood sugar levels that characterize hypoglycemia. Timing is crucial and with predetermined schedule for blood draws, the lowest level may be missed. Another problem was seen in a study done in 1994 by Genter and Ipp on a group of young, healthy people who had no symptoms of hypoglycemia[1]. Blood samples were drawn every ten minutes to measure the amount and time-release of various hormones that counteract insul Continue reading >>

Can Fibromyalgia Put Me At A Higher Risk For Diabetes?

Can Fibromyalgia Put Me At A Higher Risk For Diabetes?

Fibromyalgia is a chronic medical condition affecting 2-4% of the population, and most commonly affects adult females. Symptoms can include, but are not limited to, widespread muscle pain, fatigue and difficulty sleeping. There are no blood tests or radiology studies used to diagnose fibromyalgia; however, patients can be diagnosed by the presence of symptoms and an accurate physical examination. Diabetes, on the other hand, is a metabolic disease of elevated blood glucose. In general, obesity puts a person at a higher risk for developing diabetes later in life. There is no known connection between fibromyalgia and the risk of developing diabetes; however, it would be possible for an individual to have both conditions at the same time. Symptoms of late onset diabetes include feeling thirty, urinating frequently and fatigue. Unlike fibromyalgia, your doctor can perform blood tests, which can help diagnose diabetes. A very small Turkish study from January of 2011 did find that female patients with late onset diabetes had higher rates of fibromyalgia. But this was a very small study and cannot be used to formally connect these two medical conditions. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fibromyalgia

Diabetes And Fibromyalgia

Patients with diabetes may suffer general tiredness, soreness, and muscle aches, associated with loss of energy. Could this be Fibromyalgia? How do you tell the difference. Diabetes and Fibromyalgia A. Lee Dellon, MD, Professor of Plastic Surgery and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, Director of the Dellon Institutes for Peripheral Nerve Surgery with diabetes may suffer general tiredness, soreness, and muscle aches, associated with loss of energy. Could this be Fibromyalgia? How do you tell the difference.The American College of Rheumatology recognizes Fibromyalgia as a chronic condition with widespread and changing degrees of multifocal tenderness, involving the limbs and trunk. Many diabetics with nerve compression have symptoms in the arms and legs that could be confused with Fibromyalgia. A. Lee Dellon, MD, Director of the Dellon Institutes for Peripheral Nerve Surgery A recent article in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association addresses the physical examination techniques to differentiate Fibromyalgia from nerve entrapment in a manner that is valuable for the patient with diabetes (Fibromyalgia and Tinel’s Sign in the Foot, by Shookster, L, Falke, G.I., Ducic, I, Maloney, C.T., and Dellon, A.L., volume 94:400-403, 2004.) This group of authors has also written about this technique of examination when applied to the upper extremity (Dellon AL, Shookster L, Maloney CT, Ducic I.: Diagnosis of compressive neuropathies in patients with fibromyalgia. J Hand Surg, 28A: 894-897, 2003.) Doctor Shookster is a Rheumatologist. Dr. Falke is a Podiatrist. The other authors are members of the Dellon Institutes for Peripheral Nerve Surgery? (dellonins.com). There is no laboratory test that can be used to make the diagnosis of Fibromyalgia. However, the Ame Continue reading >>

Fibromyalgia In Diabetes Mellitus.

Fibromyalgia In Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). SUBJECTS: The study included 100 consecutive unselected patients with DM attending our diabetes clinic. Patients were divided into two groups: 45 patients with type 1 diabetes and 55 patients with type 2 diabetes. A group of 50 healthy hospital staff members served as controls. The FM was diagnosed according to the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria. Counts of 18 tender points were performed by thumb palpation and assessed by dolorimeter. Routine biochemical tests and levels of HbA(1c) were recorded in each patient. RESULTS: The main outcome measure was the association of FM with DM. Fibromyalgia was diagnosed in 17 patients (17%) with DM and in only one (2%) healthy control ( P=0.008). No differences in patients were noted in the prevalence of FM between type 1 and type 2 diabetes (18.5% vs 15.5%, respectively). Patients with both FM and DM had significantly higher levels of HbA(1c) than DM patients without FM (9.2+/-1.1% vs 6.4+/-1.5%) ( P<0.05). Similarly, the numbers of tender points, pain scores, and the prevalence of sleep disturbances, fatigue, and headaches were higher in this group of patients. A significant correlation was observed between the numbers of tender points and HbA(1c) levels in the DM patients with FM ( r=0.72, P=0.027). CONCLUSION: Fibromyalgia is a common finding in patients with types 1 and 2 diabetes, and its prevalence could be related to control of the disease. As with other diabetes complications, FM might be prevented by improved control of blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

7 Conditions Linked To Fibromyalgia

7 Conditions Linked To Fibromyalgia

Fibro-related conditions About 10 million Americans have fibromyalgia, which is characterized by painful, tender points along the body; fatigue; sleeplessness; and cognitive issues known as fibro fog. Unfortunately, people with fibromyalgia are more likely than people in the general population to have certain other conditions too. If you have fibromyalgia, here are seven other health concerns. Migraines A significant number of people with fibromyalgia also experience migraines and/or tension headaches, says Robert Duarte, MD, director of the Pain Institute at the North Shore–Long Island Jewish Health System, in Manhasset, N.Y. "An underlying disturbance in the brain chemicals serotonin and norepinephrine plays a role in causing headaches and fibromyalgia," he says. Antidepressants that target these brain chemicals may relieve migraine pain, he adds. Tension headache may also respond to biofeedback. Autoimmune diseases Up to one-quarter of people with inflammatory autoimmune diseases—including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), lupus, Sjögren's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis—also experience fibromyalgia symptoms. The precise nature of this connection is not yet understood. Fibromyalgia is not an inflammatory disease, but some research suggests that RA and other inflammatory diseases may somehow increase the risk for fibromyalgia. Restless legs Sleeplessness and other sleep problems are common for fibromyalgia patients, says Lesley Arnold MD, a psychiatrist at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Restless legs, or the overwhelming urge to move your legs when resting, may be up to 11 times more common in people with fibromyalgia than those without it. Exactly how the two are linked is not fully understood, but many fibromyalgia treatments also improve res Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fibromyalgia

Diabetes And Fibromyalgia

I went on insulin two months ago. I have early kidney disease and diabetic neuropathy. My ankles and feet are so swollen I can't find shoes. My feet and ankles sometimes hurt so bad I can't sleep or walk. I am on Lyrica for fibromyalgia and it makes the swelling worse.My blood sugar is coming down slowly with the insulin.I was put on another blood pressure pill but it made the swelling worse. I take Lisinopril and a water pill and am trying another new pill. My blood is still high. I wonder if I should go off the Lyrica? I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia 40 years ago. I have lumps in all the adipose tissue on my body. They are extremely painful and I have bands of them everywhere. My hips and lower back hurt so bad I can't walk more than a few steps. Some of the lumps are so big that you can see them like on the back of my neck. If you press on me anywhere you can feel them.I think that I have Dercum's but my rheumatologist said he has never seen a case of Dercum's. I have Sjogren's and IBS and migrains. I have to drink water all the time and still feel dehydrated. I have gained 100 pounds in the last five years. It hurts so much to do anything that I don't exercise. I had to quit working and am 62 and on Social Security.I have sciatica so bad I can hardly sit upright and lots of lumps in my lower back and buttocks. Do other people with fibromyalgia have lumps? This is the one question I would love to have answered. I of course have all the pressure points associated with fibromyalgia but also I have lumps from little to as big as walnuts in all of my fat especially around my joints and rib cage.I don't feel up to working on my diabetes as I am in so much pain from the fibromyalgia or Dercum's. I too have type 2 diabetes, and fibro, and also throw in degenerative osteo Continue reading >>

Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Fibromyalgia syndrome can cause pain in the muscles and tiredness Diabetes and Fibromyalgia syndrome are linked conditions. FMS (Fibromyalgia syndrome) literally means pain in the fibrous tissues, the most common symptoms being widespread musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. Unfortunately, the causes of Fibromyalgia remain unknown, and the disorder has only gained increasing recognition in the past twenty years. Symptoms of Fibromyalgia include a burning ache, a feeling like the muscles have been pulled or torn. Muscles may twitch or even burn. A major symptom is a profound lack of energy and extreme fatigue. Pain from FMS may be localised to one area. Due to the tiredness element of FMS, comparisons are often drawn with CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome). This level of tiredness can affect ability to focus and concentrate, and even influence the ability to move limbs. FMS has also been likened to the symptoms of those with Gulf War Syndrome. FMS is more common amongst women than men. The widespread aching pain felt by FMS sufferers comes from the connective tissues, including tendons, ligaments and the muscles. Pain may be most acute early in the morning or following exercise . However, unlike arthritis, FMS is not a joint-related condition. FMS affects both people with diabetes and people without diabetes. How is diabetes associated with Fibromyalgia syndrome? FMS is associated with a range of conditions, including diabetes. Other FMS related conditions include sleep disorders, IBS, TMJ and rheumatoid arthritis. A study carried in Israel in 2003, Fibromyalgia in diabetes mellitus, noted that fibromyalgia is commonly found in people with diabetes, and more so in people with type 1 diabetes. The researchers found evidence to suggest that the development of fibromyalgia is mor Continue reading >>

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes: Why Diabetes Feels Like Freedom

Fibromyalgia And Diabetes: Why Diabetes Feels Like Freedom

Type 1 diabetes is no picnic, sure, but type 1 diabetes has never gotten in my way. It’s made things harder, but it’s never completely stopped me from doing something I want to do. (Well, except for that career piloting a commercial jet and becoming a Navy Seal, but I’ve let that go.) With diabetes, I could teach 7 power-yoga classes a week, bench-press 190 pounds, win powerlifting competitions, jump repeatedly onto 2-foot boxes, and sprint with a 140 lbs. dragging behind me on an iron sled tied to my waist. Diabetes was freedom. With discipline around nutrition and insulin doses, and endless learning around exercise physiology, anything was possible with diabetes. Anything. Type 1 diabetics have climbed Mt. Everest, completed Ironman races, cycled 100 miles, and won the Olympics. But for the past four years, unbeknownst to me, I’ve been gradually developing fibromyalgia—and it’s nothing like diabetes. Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain in the joints, tendons and muscles, as well as low levels of serotonin, severe fatigue, sleep disturbances, headaches, and depression. Often treated with muscle relaxants and anti-depressants, it’s shown that removing gluten, dairy, caffeine, alcohol, and artificial sweeteners can be very helpful, too, in lessening symptoms. My fibromyalgia symptoms started out as a pain in my left lower back four years ago, followed by sharp pain in my elbows, then my wrists and hands, and then my entire left leg started tingling and cramping (and hasn’t stopped since) in 2011. MRIs showed no injuries in my spine. Full-body nerve-testing (which is surprising painful, by the way, sort of like getting a tattoo) couldn’t find any pinched nerves either. Chiropractors, acupuncturists, and physical therapists Continue reading >>

Diabetic And Fibromyalgia – Staying Active Without Triggering A Massive Flare-up

Diabetic And Fibromyalgia – Staying Active Without Triggering A Massive Flare-up

We all wish we could exercise like Arnold Schwarzenegger: relentlessly and mercilessly, but the reality is that many of us have several significant obstacles or balls to juggle when we show up at the gym. Blood sugar levels and insulin doses are just one of those obstacles. Others might include frozen shoulder or a hip injury or neuropathy or rheumatoid arthritis. For me, that obstacle (aside from the ol’ type 1 diabetes) is fibromyalgia. (And then the fibro of course could become an obstacle for my type 1 diabetes because exercise is HUGE to managing blood sugars and my sensitivity to insulin!) Most people think fibromyalgia is about pain, but the biggest monster of fibromyalgia is managing my energy. When I manage it well, which is most of the time, I feel awesome! When I make mistakes or push myself too far, I feel severe exhaustion. Here’s a deep-dive into how I personally manage or mis-manage my limits around fibromyalgia. What Happens When I Don’t Respect My Limits Every few months (in the past, I’ve recently smartened up) I try to lift weights again. It goes well for about a week, sometimes two weeks. My former co-workers often tease, “Oh, look who’s back!” or “Wow, you’re still alive? Been a while…” (An important detail to note: I used to be a personal trainer and an Ashtanga yoga instructor, while also training and competing in drug-free powerlifting. Between training clients 6-8 hours a day in the gym, teaching 5-7 power-yoga classes a week and following Russian powerlifting programs…I loved working out.) Here’s my personal experience of fibromyalgia flare-ups that are, 99 percent of the time, a direct result of me disrespecting my limits or acting like I don’t know I indeed have fibromyalgia: My Normal, Very Best Day: Well, let’s Continue reading >>

More in diabetes