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Fgf1 A New Weapon To Control Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Protein Discovery That Could Reverse The Damage Of Diabetes: Breakthrough Could Lead To Cheap Drug That Would Halt Disease

Protein Discovery That Could Reverse The Damage Of Diabetes: Breakthrough Could Lead To Cheap Drug That Would Halt Disease

Raises hopes of a cheap drug which could halt one of the world's fastest growing diseases Scientists have discovered a treatment for type 2 diabetes which could reverse the disease. The researchers found that a protein which is already naturally produced in the body cured the disease in mice and they are confident that it could be easily replicated in humans. The breakthrough raises hope of a cheap drug which could effectively halt one of the world’s fastest growing diseases. The protein, called FGF1, already plays a natural role in human cell growth and tissue repair - but it never usually enters the blood stream. Diabetes experts found that when the protein was injected into a muscle and interacted with the blood, it dramatically reduced blood sugar levels. Crucially, the protein also seems to reverse the root cause of type 2 diabetes - making the metabolic system react to insulin when it had been failing to do so. In obese mice with a rodent version of type 2 diabetes, just one injection of the protein FGF1 restored blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. Continued treatment with the protein reversed insulin insensitivity, they found. People with type 2 diabetes gradually become less sensitive to the effects of the hormone, forcing up their blood sugar. Professor Ronald Evans, of the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, said: ‘This is a big deal - this treatment is very simple to make. We are at a very early stage but we know all about this protein already so we have a head start. ‘Type 2 diabetes is an epidemic in the modern world and current treatments are not sufficient – it is not properly controlled. ‘This treatment offers a new method to control glucose, in a powerful, potent and very unexpected way. ‘The fact that simple re Continue reading >>

Fgf1 - A New Weapon To Control Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Fgf1 - A New Weapon To Control Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

1. Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2017 Oct;13(10):599-609. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2017.78. Epub2017 Jun 30. FGF1 - a new weapon to control type 2 diabetes mellitus. Gasser E(1), Moutos CP(1)(2)(3), Downes M(1), Evans RM(1)(2). (1)Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies. (2)Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. (3)College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205, USA. A hypercaloric diet combined with a sedentary lifestyle is a major risk factorfor the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) andassociated comorbidities. Standard treatment for T2DM begins with lifestylemodification, and includes oral medications and insulin therapy to compensate forprogressive -cell failure. However, current pharmaceutical options for T2DM are limited in that they do not maintain stable, durable glucose control without the need for treatment intensification. Furthermore, each medication is associatedwith adverse effects, which range from hypoglycaemia to weight gain or bone loss.Unexpectedly, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) and its low mitogenic variantshave emerged as potentially safe candidates for restoring euglycaemia, withoutcausing overt adverse effects. In particular, a single peripheral injection ofFGF1 can lower glucose to normal levels within hours, without the risk ofhypoglycaemia. Similarly, a single intracerebroventricular injection of FGF1 can induce long-lasting remission of the diabetic phenotype. This Review discussespotential mechanisms by which centrally administered FGF1 improves centralglucose-sensing and peripheral glucose uptake in a sustained manner.Specific Continue reading >>

Single Injection Reverses Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Mice Without Side Effects

Single Injection Reverses Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Mice Without Side Effects

Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects There are numerous research efforts underway to develop new treatments and improve the lives of people suffering type 2 diabetes, whose ranks have increased dramatically in recent decades due in large part to the so-called obesity epidemic. A new generation of safer and more effective diabetes drugs could be in the offing with researchers at the Salk Institute discovering that when mice with diet-induced diabetes were given a single injection of a protein, their blood sugar levels were restored to a healthy range for more than two days. Although type 2 diabetes can sometimes be managed through a healthy diet and regular exercise in the initial stages, tablets that boost the body's production of insulin are generally prescribed as the disease progresses. Such tablets can have side effects, including nausea and diarrhea, and aren't suitable for everyone, such as pregnant women and those with severe liver, kidney or heart disease. They can also cause blood glucose levels to drop too low, potentially resulting in hypoglycemia. Now Salk researchers have found that injecting obese mice with the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans with a single dose of protein FGF1 quickly restored their blood glucose levels to normal levels where they remained for more than two days. Importantly, even when given high doses, the mice suffered none of the side effects common to most current diabetes treatments, such as weight gain or heart and liver problems. "With FGF1, we really haven't seen hypoglycemia or other common side effects," says Salk postdoctoral research fellow Jae Myoung Suh. "It may be that FGF1 leads to a more 'normal' type of response compared to other drugs because it metabolizes quickly in t Continue reading >>

Antibody News

Antibody News

Groundbreaking research depends on the ability to respond quickly to new ideas and lead the field in novel directions. For such pioneer research, the cataloged antibodies are usually unavailable. You simply can't afford to wait for your antibody to be readily available to move your project forward, especially if you work with a rare model organism. GenScript's Custom antibody production service allows you to get your specific antibody fast and cost-effectively. Human Evolution is Leading to a Reduction in Alzheimer's Disease and Chronic Smoking In order to understand the link between genetic variation and evolutionary fitness, scientists from Columbia University developed a new method of analysis which allowed them to quantitatively measure viability selection. Using their novel methodology, researchers were able to identify a significant reduction in the frequency of the genes APOE and CHRNA3, which are responsible for Alzheimer's Disease progression and chronic smoking, respectively. The study was conducted using two well established genetic cohorts, the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort and the parents of participants in the UK biobank. These groups allowed researchers to analyze genomes from about 200,000 people of varying genders and ages. Using their novel methodology, researchers were able to identify a significant reduction in the frequency of a limited number of genes, two of which were APOE and CHRNA3. APOE 4 allele has been shown to be responsible for increased risk of both late onset Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease. In this study, researchers were able to identify that the frequency of this gene significantly decreased in patients 70 years old or older, indicating the onset of purifying evolution. A similar Continue reading >>

A Single Injection Can Eliminate Type 2 Diabetes In Mice For Months

A Single Injection Can Eliminate Type 2 Diabetes In Mice For Months

Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to better treatments for diabetes in the future, with a protein injection administered directly into the brains of rodents with type 2 diabetes putting the animals into remission for several months. Both mice and rats were injected with a low dose of synthesised Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 (FGF1), a growth-promoting protein known to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. But while FGF1 had previously been shown to restore healthy blood sugar levels in mice for up to two days after injection, the same hormones injected directly into the animals' brains provided a dramatically extended effect: up to 17 weeks of what the researchers call a "sustained remission". While it might not be quite a cure, it's still a big improvement on previous research with FGF1, and the findings could lead to a new potential target for diabetic treatments – focusing on the brain's role in regulating blood glucose levels, rather than other organs and organ systems in the body. "We thought that FGF1 could be acting in the brain, because the receptors for FGF1 are highly prevalent there," gastroenterologist Jarrad Scarlett from the University of Washington told Laurie Tarkan at EndocrineWeb. "We think that diabetes represents a dysfunction of neural circuits within the brain. What FGF1 is doing is acting upon these circuits to ameliorate the dysfunction." And the level of that effect surprised even the researchers, who thought they might see similar results to what had previously been shown when diabetic mice bodies were injected with the protein. "We were expecting the results to last 48 to 72 hours, not several months," Scarlett told EndocrineWeb. "We think it's stimulating synaptic remodelling within these circuits." When the first diabeti Continue reading >>

Control Of Fibroblast Growth Factor (fgf) 7- And Fgf1-induced Mitogenesis And Downstream Signaling By Distinct Heparin Octasaccharide Motifs*

Control Of Fibroblast Growth Factor (fgf) 7- And Fgf1-induced Mitogenesis And Downstream Signaling By Distinct Heparin Octasaccharide Motifs*

Variation in length, disaccharide composition, and sulfation of heparan sulfate (HS) affects fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. However, it is unclear whether the specific distribution of groups within oligosaccharides or random variations in charge density underlies the effects. Recently we showed that a mixture of undersulfated octasaccharides exhibiting 7 and 8 sulfates (7,8-S-OctaF7) generated from heparin had the highest affinity for FGF7 monitored by salt resistance (>0.60 m salt) of octasaccharide-FGF7 complexes. 7,8-S-OctaF7 also had the highest specific activity for formation of a complex with dimeric FGFR2IIIb competent to bind FGF7. Here we show that when endogenous HS was inhibited by chlorate treatment, 7,8-S-OctaF7 specifically supported FGF7-stimulated DNA synthesis and downstream signaling in FGFR2IIIb-expressing mouse keratinocytes. It failed to support FGF1 signaling in both HS-deficient mouse keratinocytes and 3T3 fibroblasts. In contrast, abundant, more highly sulfated and heterogenous mixtures of octasaccharides with lower affinity (0.30-0.60 m salt) for FGF7 supported FGF1-induced signaling in both cell types. In contrast to the two-component 7,8-S-OctaF7 mixture from FGF7, the high affinity octasaccharide fraction from FGF1 was a heterogeneous mixture with components ranging from 8 to 12 sulfates with 11-S-octasaccharides the most abundant. The high affinity fraction exhibited similar properties to the lower affinity fractions from both FGF1 and FGF7. Octasaccharide mixtures eluting from FGF1 between 0.30 and 0.60 m and above 0.60 m salt were nearly equal in support of FGF1 signaling in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Both were deficient in support of FGF7-induced signaling in keratinocytes. The results show that both variations in overall Continue reading >>

Fgf1 | Posmed | Metabolic

Fgf1 | Posmed | Metabolic

Fgf-1, Fgfa, fibroblast growth factor 1 (acidic) Documents related to Fgf1: 2507, keyword hit: 46 Nature reviews. Endocrinology 2017 Oct Finally, we highlight therapeutic considerations of FGF1 and compare its metabolic actions with FGF15 (rodents), FGF19 (humans) and FGF21 . International journal of obesity (2005) 2014 Mar Targeted analysis of genes, having a role in adipose tissue development and function, revealed that Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha ( PGC1 -) that regulates the precursor of the hormone Irisin (FNCD5) were abundantly expressed in all three fat depots, along with fibroblast growth factors (FGF) FGF1 , FGF7 and FGF10 , whereas, FGF19 and FGF21 were undetectable.These data indicate that EAT has more in common with VAT, suggesting similar metabolic potential. Recent patents on cardiovascular drug discovery 2006 Jun In particular, the two prototypic members of FGF family, namely FGF1 and FGF2 , due to their potent mitogenic and pro-migratory activities, have the ability to induce metabolic and phenotypic changes in ECs that are required to stimulate angiogenesis. The Role and Potential Therapeutic Implications of the Fibroblast Growth Factors in Energy Balance and Type 2 Diabetes. Current diabetes reports 2017 Jun Among all members, FGF19 and FGF21 have demonstrated the ability to improve glucose , lipid and energy homeostasis, along with FGF1 , which was recently discovered to have beneficial effects on metabolic homeostasis. DNA and cell biology 2017 May ABSTRACT- The aim of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the effects of using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) transfected with an episomal plasmid encoding fibroblast growth factor 1 ( FGF1 ) (AD-MSCs ORGANISATION- 1 Department of Med Continue reading >>

Fgf1 - A New Weapon To Control Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Fgf1 - A New Weapon To Control Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 400 million adults worldwide (~9% of the adult popu- lation), a number almost double than that seen in 1980 (REFS1,2). The estimated US$825billion spent globally each year in direct expenses related to the management of T2DM will only increase, as the prevalence of the disease is expected to continue to rise in coming dec- ades3. The current pharmacological paradigm of T2DM management involves sequential attempts at normo- glycaemia with oral agents, which often culminate in the need for patients to be placed on insulin to approach glycaemic control. An increasing number of new drugs and drug classes have become available to manage the disease; however, despite initial promise, each option remains hampered by a combination of adverse effects and lack of long-term efficacy4,5. In all, the disease has largely remained a chronic and progressive condition. Although stem cell-derived -cell replacement could possibly cure diabetes mellitus, successful metrics have not been met. With no widely effective treatment, let alone cure, available and rates of the disease continuing to rise alongside costs, the toll of T2DM seems to be In this regard, fibroblast growth factor1 (FGF1) has emerged as a promising solution to the diabetes dilemma. Although FGF1 is considered to be a well- established component of processes such as embryonic development, wound healing, neurogenesis and angio- genesis, the whole-body Fgf1-knockout mouse shows no deficiency in any of these processes6,7. Indeed, only in 2014, was FGF1 shown to be a metabolic hormone crucial for the management of nutrient stress, glycaemic control and insulin sensitivity8. Fg f1-knockout mice develop marked hyperglycaemia and insulin resist- ance when challenged with a high-fat Continue reading >>

Ranger College Library

Ranger College Library

Subjects: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / *metabolism ; Insulin / Insulin / Insulin / *metabolism ; Insulin-Secreting Cells / Insulin-Secreting Cells / Insulin-Secreting Cells / *metabolism Source: Biochemical And Biophysical Research Communications [Biochem Biophys Res Commun] 2018 Jan 01; Vol. 495 (1), pp. 1312-1316. Date of Electronic Publication: 2017 Dec 02.Publisher: Elsevier Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 0372516 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: Insulin resistance and reduced metabolic flexibility: cause or consequence of NAFLD? Authors : Gastaldelli A ; Cardiometabolic Risk Laboratory, Institute of Clinical Physiology, CNR, via Moruzzi 1, 56100 Pisa, Italy [email protected] Subjects: Energy Metabolism* / Energy Metabolism* / Energy Metabolism* / genetics ; Insulin Resistance* / Insulin Resistance* / Insulin Resistance* / genetics ; Blood Glucose / Blood Glucose / Blood Glucose / *metabolism Source: Clinical Science (London, England: 1979) [Clin Sci (Lond)] 2017 Nov 06; Vol. 131 (22), pp. 2701-2704. Date of Electronic Publication: 20171106 (Print Publication: 2017).Publisher: Portland Press on behalf of the Medical Research Society and the Biochemical Society Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 7905731 Publication Model: Impact of improving postprandial glycemic control with intensifying insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Authors : Yacoub T ; a Endocrinology Division , Prima-Care Medical Center , Fall River , MA , USA. Subjects: Antineoplastic Agents / Antineoplastic Agents / Antineoplastic Agents / *therapeutic use ; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / *drug therapy ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / Diabetes Mellit Continue reading >>

Modulation Of Metabolic Syndrome By Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 (fgf19)?

Modulation Of Metabolic Syndrome By Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 (fgf19)?

Modulation of Metabolic Syndrome by Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 (FGF19)? Departments of Pharmacology (A.M.S.) Merck Research Laboratories Rahway, New Jersey 07065 Search for other works by this author on: Metabolic Disorders (R.W.M.) Merck Research Laboratories Rahway, New Jersey 07065 Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology, Volume 145, Issue 6, 1 June 2004, Pages 25912593, Alison M. Strack, Robert W. Myers; Modulation of Metabolic Syndrome by Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 (FGF19)?, Endocrinology, Volume 145, Issue 6, 1 June 2004, Pages 25912593, Obesity and its related comorbidities, often encompassed in the metabolic syndrome, are expected to soon surpass tobacco smoking as the leading cause of preventable death ( 1 ). The key features of metabolic syndrome include abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance with or without glucose intolerance, and increased blood pressure ( 2 ). Left unchecked, metabolic syndrome often progresses to overt type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. A new weapon in the armamentarium of approaches to combat the growth of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes may be a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins, FGF19. The article by Fu et al. ( 3 ) in this issue extends previous results from Genentech ( 4 ) that demonstrated decreased body weight and adiposity as well as increased energy expenditure in transgenic mice expressing human FGF19; in addition, resistance to both diet-induced obesity and insulin desensitization were observed. They now demonstrate comparable improvements in body weight, adiposity, and glucose and lipid endpoints with the transgenic FGF19 mice crossed into the more aggressive ob/ob (leptin depleted) and UCP-DTA (brown adipose tissue deficient) mouse mode Continue reading >>

Can Treating The Brain Help In The Fight Against Diabetes?

Can Treating The Brain Help In The Fight Against Diabetes?

Can treating the brain help in the fight against diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, which affects nearly 30 million American adults, might be cured by an approach that treats the brain, a new study suggests. (Reid Saxon / Associated Press) In research that may point the way to new treatments for Type 2 , obese and diabetic mice who got a single shot of a growth-promoting peptide directly into their brains experienced lasting remission from the metabolic disorder without any sustained changes to their diet or their weight. A week after researchers injected a low dose of synthesized mouse Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 FGF1 directly into the ventricles of diabetic mouse brains, the mice's erratic blood glucose levels stabilized at normal levels. Thenthey stayed normal for 17 weeks effectively curing the mice of their diabetes. See the most-read stories in Science this hour >> It was a level of remission until now seen only in the wake of bariatric surgery, the authors reported Monday in the journal Nature Medicine . The study was led by endocrinologist Michael W. Schwartz, gastroenterologist Jarrad M. Scarlett and molecular physiologist Jennifer M. Rojas. Schwartz directs the s Diabetes and Obesity Center of Excellence and Scarlett and Rojas conduct research there. The success of a direct-to-the-brain treatment for diabetes in mice is unlikely to prompt such radical treatments for humans not anytime soon, at least. But it does highlight a little-appreciated surmise about Type 2 diabetes: that it may be, to some extent at least, a brain disease, and that treatments that go to the source of the metabolic dysfunction may lead to "cures" that have not been achieved by treating its downstream effects in the pancreas, blood, liver, muscles and fat. "That's a novel perspective," Schwartz s Continue reading >>

News - Salk Institute For Biological Studies

News - Salk Institute For Biological Studies

Molecule that gives energy-burning brown fat its identity could lead to drugs for obesity LA JOLLAWhile most fat cells in the human body store energy, everyone has a small subset of brown fat cells that do the oppositeburn energy and generate heat. Now, Salk researchers have discovered how the molecule ERR gives this healthier brown fat its energy-expending identity, making those cells ready to warm you up when you step into the cold, and potentially offering a new therapeutic target for diseases related to obesity.The paper appears in Cell Reports on March 13, 2018. Salk scientists find power switch for muscles LA JOLLAIf youve ever wondered how strenuous exercise translates into better endurance, researchers at the Salk Institute may have your answer. In a study published in the journal Cell Reports on March 6, 2018, scientists in Ronald Evans lab have shown that the protein ERR (ERR gamma) helps deliver many of the benefits associated with endurance exercise. Salk and UC San Diego scientists receive $1.5 million to study firefighter health LA JOLLAWe count on firefighters to protect us in life-threatening situations. So its in everyones best interest for them to be healthy and fit. Salk Institute and University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have been awarded a $1.5 million grant by the Department of Homeland Security for a three-year study to see whether restricting food intake to a 10-hour window can improve firefighters well-being. Salk researchers discover how liver responds so quickly to food LA JOLLAMinutes after you eat a meal, as nutrients rush into your bloodstream, your body makes massive shifts in how it breaks down and stores fats and sugars. Within half an hour, your liver has made a complete switch, going from burning fat for en Continue reading >>

Central Injection Of Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 Induces Sustained Remission Of Diabetic Hyperglycemia In Rodents

Central Injection Of Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 Induces Sustained Remission Of Diabetic Hyperglycemia In Rodents

Central injection of fibroblast growth factor 1 induces sustained remission of diabetic hyperglycemia in rodents Jarrad M Scarlett - University of Washington, Seattle Children's Hospital Jennifer M Rojas - University of Washington Miles E Matsen - University of Washington Karl J Kaiyala - University of Washington Darko Stefanovski - University of Pennsylvania Richard N Bergman - University of Southern California Hong T Nguyen - University of Washington Mauricio D Dorfman - University of Washington Louise Lantier - Vanderbilt University David H Wasserman - Vanderbilt University Zaman Mirzadeh - Barrow Neurological Institute Terry G Unterman - Medical Service, Jesse Brown Virginia Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA., University of Illinois at Chicago Gregory J Morton - University of Washington Michael W Schwartz - University of Washington Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is among the most common and costly disorders worldwide. The goal of current medical management for T2D is to transiently ameliorate hyperglycemia through daily dosing of one or more antidiabetic drugs. Hypoglycemia and weight gain are common side effects of therapy, and sustained disease remission is not obtainable with nonsurgical approaches. On the basis of the potent glucose-lowering response elicited by activation of brain fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors, we explored the antidiabetic efficacy of centrally administered FGF1, which, unlike other FGF peptides, activates all FGF receptor subtypes. We report that a single intracerebroventricular injection of FGF1 at a dose one-tenth of that needed for antidiabetic efficacy following peripheral injection induces sustained diabetes remission in both mouse and rat models of T2D. This antidiabetic effect is not secondary to weight loss, does not increase t Continue reading >>

Testosterone Level And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Men: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Testosterone Level And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Men: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Testosterone level and risk of type 2 diabetes in men: a systematic review and meta-analysis 1Department of Endocrinology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China 2Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai University of Medicine & Health Sciences Affiliated Zhoupu Hospital, Shanghai, China 3Department of Clinical Laboratory, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China Correspondence should be addressed to J Zhang or L Ding: zhangjinan{at}hotmail.com or dlm196969{at}163.com Background Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for testosterone deficiency and impaired sex steroid status. Some studies also investigated the association of testosterone level with diabetes risk in men, but reported controversial findings. To clarify this issue, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for eligible cohort or nested casecontrol studies published up to August 15, 2017. Meta-analysis was used to calculate the pooled relative risk (RR) of type 2 diabetes associated with higher testosterone level. Results Thirteen cohort or nested casecontrol studies with 16,709 participants were included. Meta-analysis showed that higher total testosterone level could significantly decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes in men (RR = 0.65; 95% CI 0.500.84; P = 0.001), and higher free testosterone level could also decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes in men (RR = 0.94; 95% CI 0.900.99; P = 0.014). After excluding two studies that did not calculate RRs by quartiles of testosterone levels, both higher total testosterone and free testosterone levels could decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes in men, and the pooled RRs were 0.62 (95% CI 0.510.76; P < 0.001) and 0.77 (95% CI 0.610.98; P = 0.03), respectively. Conclusion This meta Continue reading >>

Fgf1 On Topsy.one

Fgf1 On Topsy.one

Explore the potential of #FGF1 as a new weapon to control type 2 #diabetes mellitus () go.nature.com/2hP0uMa #T2DM #T2D BioArctic Receives Regulatory Approval in Norway for a Clinical Study in Patients With Complete Spinal Cord Injury Wed, 21 Mar 2018 05:31:00 GMT The candidate product is a combination of a medical device (implant) and a medicinal product (FGF1) for patients with complete spinal cord injury. "Our ambition is to develop SC0806 to improve the quality of life for patients with complete spinal cord ... How can central injection of #FGF1 improve central #glucose sensing & peripheral glucose uptake? go.nature.com/2f4afF3 #diabetes #T1D #T2D Also in our October issue: #FGF1 a new weapon to control type 2 #diabetes mellitus () go.nature.com/2f4afF3 Scientists find cure for type 2 diabetes in rodents, dont know how it works Wed, 25 May 2016 08:02:00 GMT The injection, a relatively low dose of a tissue growth factor protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1), appears to reset powerful neural networks that can control the amount of sugar in the blood. So far, its not completely clear how exactly ... The @NatureRevEndo October issue is live! Featuring articles on #FGF1 , #diabetes , #glucosemetabolism & more go.nature.com/2eUqRvs Could this new 'wonder drug' inhaled through the nose cure diabetes? Mon, 23 May 2016 08:14:28 GMT A 'wonder drug' inhaled through the nose could 'cure' diabetes, a study has found. The hormone FGF1 (fibroblast growth factor 1) may end the misery of insulin injections for millions of sufferers across the world, according to researchers. A single dose of ... Check out #FGF1 a new weapon to control type 2 #diabetes mellitus by Ron Evans & colleagues go.nature.com/2tB9h8x #T2D #T2DM #insulin #Mustread : Ron Evans & colleagues on transl Continue reading >>

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