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Fever Medicine For Diabetics

Cold And Flu And What To Do

Cold And Flu And What To Do

Getting sick can be scary and especially when you or a loved one is Type 1. As the body tries to fight off the virus, blood glucose levels elevate, causing rapid and dangerous highs. And when youre not feeling well, you may find it difficult to keep down fluids or even eat, causing you to go too low. Then theres the issue of medicine which to take and how to dose for it if needed. Theres a lot to consider, but rest assured! Weve talked to doctors about what is recommended in terms of planning ahead and the protocol if you or your loved one are faced with a bug. While this season brings with it challenges to staying healthy, here are some helpful guidelines when facing off with the cold or flu. Whatsthedifference between a cold and flu? A cold is a milder respiratory infection than a flu. While both can cause a soar throat, cough, runny nose and congestion, a flu is usually accompanied by body aches, fever and lasts much longer than a common cold. As a Type 1 or as a caretaker of a Type 1, you should plan ahead so youre readynot only for the cold, a common and frequent ailment, but also, the more unruly cousin the flu, who outstays his welcome and can cause serious havoc if left unchecked. lists of recommended medications you can taketo alleviatecertain symptoms the contact of your doctor and when / where they can be reached during regular hours as well as holiday time a plan of action (if / then scenarios), how often you should check your BGLs and whenyou should contact a doctor. low-calorie sports drinks (for fast-acting sugars and electrolytes) These are usually offered in the fall and are highly recommended for anyone who is at higher risk for complications if they contract influenza. Youve heard it a million times, but it really is one of the best ways to prevent c Continue reading >>

Can A Simple Fever Be That Bad For A Diabetes Patient?

Can A Simple Fever Be That Bad For A Diabetes Patient?

No doubt you’ve heard the advice, “Drink plenty of fluids,” for a fever. This is because fever causes considerable fluid loss through the skin as perspiration. Your loss of fluid can be difficult to estimate, so your physician may want to assume that you’d require 1–2 more quarts of fluid daily than you’d normally need. Ordinarily, a mild fever helps to destroy the infectious agent (virus or bacteria) that caused the fever. The tendency to sleep out fever may also be beneficial. For a diabetic, however, the somnolence that you experience with fever may discourage you from checking your blood sugar, covering with insulin, drinking adequate fluid, and calling your physician every few hours. If you don’t have someone awaken you every 20 minutes, you should use aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol), or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), in accordance with your doctor’s instructions, to help fight the fever. Beware, however, that aspirin can cause false positive readings on tests for urinary ketones, so don’t even test for ketones if you are using aspirin. Never use aspirin or ibuprofen (or any of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) for fever in children because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome. Excessive doses of aspirin or NSAIDs (naproxen, ibuprofen, and many others) can cause severe hypoglycemia. If at all possible, try not to use NSAIDs, as the combination of these drugs with dehydration can cause kidney failure. Acetaminophen can be highly toxic if used in doses greater than those indicated on the package label. If you have fever, the guidelines for blood sugar control and replacement of fluid are almost the same as indicated previously for vomiting. There is one difference, however. Since there is very little electrolyte loss in perspiration, it Continue reading >>

List Of Medications Available For Diabetes

List Of Medications Available For Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder of blood sugar levels. There are two main types of diabetes, plus rarer forms such as diabetes that can happen during pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes results in high blood sugar levels because the body stops producing insulin, the hormone that regulates sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes leads to high blood sugars because the insulin in the body does not work effectively. The broad differences in treatment between the two types are: Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injection. Careful diet and activity planning is needed to avoid complications of treatment. Type 2 diabetes is treated with lifestyle measures, drugs taken by mouth, and sometimes also insulin if the other treatments fail. Medications for type 1 diabetes Treatment for type 1 diabetes is always with insulin, to replace the body's absent insulin and keep blood sugar levels under control. Insulin treatments Insulin is usually given by injection - by patients themselves, injecting it under the skin, or if hospitalized, sometimes directly into the blood. It is also available as a powder that patients can breathe in. Insulin injections vary by how quickly they act, their peak action, and how long they last. The aim is to mimic how the body would produce insulin throughout the day and in relation to energy intake. 1. Rapid-acting injections take effect within 5 to 15 minutes but last for a shorter time of 3 to 5 hours: Insulin lispro (Humalog) Insulin aspart (NovoLog) Insulin glulisine (Apidra) 2. Short-acting injections take effect from between 30 minutes and 1 hour, and last for 6 to 8 hours: Regular insulin (Humulin R and Novolin R) 3. Intermediate-acting injections take effect after about 2 hours, and last for 18 to 26 hours: Insulin isophane, also called NPH i Continue reading >>

Choosing A Pain Reliever

Choosing A Pain Reliever

Choosing Wisely is an initiative by the ABIM Foundation to identify commonly-used tests or procedures whose necessity should be questioned and discussed. This information was developed by Consumer Reports in cooperation with the American Society of Nephrology. If you need a painkiller but suffer from high blood pressure, heart failure, or kidney disease, it’s best to steer clear of some commonly used pain relievers. Those include: Ibuprofen, which is sold under the brand names Advil and Motrin, and also as a generic or store brand. You can buy it without a prescription at the drug store. It’s sometimes combined with other drugs in other over-the-counter products, such as certain cold remedies. Naproxen, sold under the brand name Aleve and as a generic or store brand. It doesn’t need a prescription, either. Celecoxib, a prescription drug sold as Celebrex. All three of those drugs, which are called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, can ease pain and inflammation. But they are too risky if you have any of those health problems. Here’s why. They’re bad for high blood pressure. All NSAIDs can cause or worsen high blood pressure. That increases your chance of having a heart attack or stroke. The drugs can also make some blood pressure drugs less effective. That includes diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril and generic), ACE inhibitors such as lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril, and generic) and ARBs such as losartan (Cozaar and generic). They’re bad for the heart and kidneys. Long-term use of NSAIDs can make your body hold onto fluid, which can worsen heart failure symptoms, such as shortness of breath, swollen ankles, and a rapid or irregular heartbeat. They can also reduce kidney function. That makes the drugs risky for people who already Continue reading >>

5 Best Tips To Manage Diabetes When Youre Sick

5 Best Tips To Manage Diabetes When Youre Sick

Whether you are sickor are just getting older, there are times in life when you dont feel much like eating. If youre eatingfewer calories because youve lost your appetite, youll probably need to pay closer attention to your blood sugars and adjust your diabetes medications. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Here are some tips from the experts to help you manage your diabetes: You can easily get dehydrated if you have fever, vomiting or diarrhea. Your main risk from dehydration is hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Taking certaincold medications, skipping diabetes medications and eating food erraticallycanalso sometimes lead to high blood sugar. When youre ill, its very important to check your blood sugar regularly, continue to take medications on a schedule and drink fluids regularly, says diabetes specialist Bartolome Burguera, MD . If your blood sugar goes over 250, check your urine for keytones, which are produced when your body has difficulty processing blood sugar, and call your doctor, Dr. Burguera says. When youre not able to eat as much as normal or dont have an appetite, meal replacement drinks are often helpful. Nutritional shakes formulated for people with diabeteshave a moderate amount of carbohydrate, which is appropriate, Dr. Burguera says. You can also make homemade meal-replacement shakes using: A protein source (e.g., protein powder, Greek yogurt, peanut butter, tofu) Noodle soups are also typically well tolerated and the noodles offercarbohydrates, which may help prevent low blood sugars, he says. Dr. Burguera suggests putting togethera sick-day diabetes tool kit that includes things you can eat or drink when yo Continue reading >>

What Causes Fever In People With Diabetes?

What Causes Fever In People With Diabetes?

Fever is often a sign of infection somewhere in the body. It is an important immune system function that sometimes serves to kill the invading organism. People with diabetes are prone to several types of infection. It is important for a person with diabetes to seek treatment for infection or a chronic fever of unknown origin, as an acute illness can make diabetes more difficult to manage. Video of the Day The Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals notes that people with diabetes have an increased risk for urinary tract infections. The severity of this type of infection is often worse in people with diabetes than that found in a person without diabetes. Often, a urinary tract infection affects the bladder, a condition called cystitis. A low-grade fever may develop with cystitis and other urinary tract infections. Treatment typically consists of oral antibiotics. Merck indicates that a person with diabetes may need a longer course of treatment. Thrush is a yeast infection that occurs in moist areas of the body, such as the mouth. MedlinePlus, a website maintained by the National Institutes of Health, indicates that a person with diabetes is at increased risk of getting thrush in the mouth because elevated glucose levels in saliva serve as food for the yeast. Oral thrush may cause a low-grade fever, explains the text, "Medical-Surgical Nursing." A prescription anti-fungal mouth rinse or lozenge is often prescribed to treat oral thrush. Foot problems are a serious concern for people with diabetes. They can easily develop because of a combination of poor circulation and nerve damage that allows a minor problem to become worse. Foot ulcers can easily become infected, characterized by redness, foul-smelling drainage or dead tissue. A fever may be present, but sometimes a di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Sick Or Illness

Diabetes Sick Or Illness

Ads by Google Getting sick is scary and especially when you or a loved one has diabetes. During sickness, your body tries to fight off infection, thus raise is cortisol hormone. Which in turn causes rapid and dangerously high blood glucose level. Additionally, when you are not able to keep down fluids or even eat, this causes you to go too low blood glucose level. Any illness among a diabetes individual can make their blood-glucose level to fluctuate. During illness, do not try to stop taking your diabetes pills or insulin even if you cannot eat as normal. Even your doctor recommend you to take extra insulin when you are sick. Pay close attention to your blood glucose levels - Check your blood glucose every two to four hours and record it. If your blood sugar remains high or getting too low, then consult healthcare professional at your earliest. Test for the presence of ketones - Type 1 diabetes whose blood glucose level over 250 mg/dl when left untreated leads to ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition develops due to the burning of fat for energy instead of glucose. So you should test the presence of ketones in the urine. Keep taking your diabetes medicines/insulin, even if you cannot keep food down. Don't avoid medication/insulin – It is quite natural for you to think to avoid medicine during illness, because you may have a fear of going low blood glucose due to eating less. But stress hormones are usually high during an illness that needs extra medicine than usual. An exception is if you are on metformin with dehydration that can affect kidney function. In such a case, ask your doctor whether you can discontinue metformin. You should avoid dehydration by drinking a glass of water or herbal tea every hour. If you are vomiting or diarrhea then drink broth that contains Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

The cold and flu season is on its way. And while sick days bring everyone down, people with type 2 diabetes have some special considerations when they're under the weather. In addition to choosing the right cold medications and checking in with your doctor about possible dosage changes, good diabetes care means being prepared for the days when you would rather not drag yourself out of bed for a glucose check or a snack. Pick the Right Cold Medicine “A lot of [cold and flu] medications, particularly cough syrup, are high in glucose,” says internist Danny Sam, MD, the program director of the residency program at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, Calif. His practice specializes in adult diabetes. If you have diabetes, your best bet is a medicine that is clearly labeled sugar-free. Almost every major pharmacy has a store brand of sugar-free cold or cough medicine, says Dr. Sam. If you have questions, ask your pharmacist for help. Check Blood Sugar Often “Diabetes is not as well controlled when you are sick,” observes Sam. This is because when your body fights infection, it releases a chemical cascade that can alter your body’s glucose and insulin response. As a result, you may need to check your blood sugar more often than you usually do. People with type 2 diabetes may need to check their blood sugar four times a day, and should check their urine for ketones anytime their blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dL. Other medications you may need to take when you are sick can affect your blood sugar levels: Aspirin may lower blood sugar levels Certain antibiotics may decrease blood sugar levels in those taking some oral diabetes medications Decongestants may raise blood sugar levels Adjust Your Plan “You have to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and you m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Patient - My Father Is Diabetic | Practo Consult

Diabetic Patient - My Father Is Diabetic | Practo Consult

My father is diabetic having high bp also 180/100Sugar level 274 Is having fever cold Already given Crocin temp is 101.4 after 30 min no improvement . He is feeling very weak don't know what med to give him Hello there. I can understand your concern. Fever and other acute conditions are known to raise the blood pressure and sugar levels. Kindly give him dolo 650 thrice a day and if you do not see any improvements by 1 day or so, then take him to a nearest physician in person for further evaluation and management. Best regards. Dr. Anil kumar jain. Let others know if this answer was helpful First of all your father's BP and sugar values are very high. He needs immediate medical attention. Take him to a doctor. It makes more than 30 mins for Cronin to act. Let others know if this answer was helpful Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The internet is not a doctor and neither are you. Chat with a real doctor about your health. My body fat high blood pressure 180/100.my body fat high blood pressure 180/100my body fat high blood prm ... Read More Tooth extraction to be done but diabetes random is at 300 and fasting sugar levels 230. currently using z ... Read More Hi Sir,I am using GLIMY M2 Tablet from last few months back, but it is not control the diabetic, I have ... Read More My father is 78 years old. He is having low sodium levels. He also gives blank looks. His sugar levels ar ... Read More These last 5 days i have been constipated Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Flu And Diabetes

Flu And Diabetes

Tweet People with diabetes are generally at a greater risk if they catch flu (influenza) as it can pose significant difficulties with diabetes management. Flu is a viral infection which is easily caught through inhaling small droplets released when someone with the flu virus nearby coughs or sneezes. A dangerous complication of the flu is pneumonia and people with diabetes are more at risk of developing this complication than people without diabetes. Flu, and other viral infections, can lead to higher blood sugar levels and increase the risk of serious short term complications risk, particularly short term complications such as ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic State (HHS). Read more on getting vacinated against the flu. What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms of flu may occur rapidly and include: Severe aching and pain in joints Aching muscles Aching around the eyes Fever Warm, flushed skin Headache Dry cough Sore throat and discharge from the nose Complications of the flu Influenza can lead to chest infections which may develop into pneumonia. Rarer complications include tonsilitis, meningitis and encephalitis. The flu can be a killer and is responsible for around 600 deaths a year. During an epidemic, flu can kill thousands of people in a year. Diabetes and flu medication Some over-the-counter flu medication is suitable for people with diabetes. Some over-the-counter flu medication will be more suitable for people with diabetes than others. For instance, some flu medications contain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, which are not usually recommended for people with diabetes because they may slightly increase the risk of heart problems and stroke. A number of flu medications may contain a relatively high level of sugar which could pre Continue reading >>

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

It is that time of year again and as a Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator one of the most common questions over the fall, the holiday’s and winter months is “What do you have to treat my cold?” or simply “Can you make me feel better?” Well there is no cure and we cannot wave our “therapeutic” wand and make symptoms disappear but there are a variety of products to help with the symptoms of cough and cold. If the patient is relatively healthy it may be a bit of a hit or miss scenario but usually the product will ease the symptoms until the cold runs its course over 7 to 10 days. The picture becomes less clear when the patient is taking other medications, has medical conditions such as kidney disease, blood pressure, or they have diabetes. Assisting our patient choose an appropriate product that will not worsen their existing medical conditions, and lessen the symptoms that make them feel miserable is key. Diabetes is a condition that requires some adjusting to choose the right product. It is not always a “Sugar free”, “Natural”, or alternative product that is best, as active ingredients may have issues. These include raising blood sugars, raising blood pressure or stressing the kidneys (common issues with diabetes). Usually after a brief discussion to educate the patient, a product can be chosen to help both their symptoms and minimally impact their diabetes and blood sugars. The discussion that follows is a practical approach on how to decide what a person with diabetes can use so that they understand why we avoid certain classes of products due to a their existing medical conditions. Blood Sugars Can Rise when Ill It is important to realize that when a person with diabetes is “fighting” a cold it produces stresses on the body as a whole and Continue reading >>

Should You Be Taking Paracetamol? Painkiller Can Interact With These Common Medications

Should You Be Taking Paracetamol? Painkiller Can Interact With These Common Medications

It's typically used to relieve mild or moderate pain, such as headaches, toothache or sprains, and reduce fevers caused by illnesses such as colds and flu. Paracetamol is often recommended as one of the first treatments for pain, as it's safe for most people to take and side effects from the painkillers are rare. People often question if it is safe to take paracetamol and ibuprofen together, and the NHS recommended it is safe to take both doses at the same time or spaced apart. NHS Choices said: “If you're 16 or over, you may wish to use paracetamol and ibuprofen together to reduce pain and fever. “There are no known harmful interactions between paracetamol and ibuprofen in people over 16.” However, there are some drug combinations which experts warn could react ‘unpredictably’ with other medications. One type of drug - used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes could affect how the drug works. Lixisenatide is used to help reduce blood glucose in people with diabetes, and it is usually injected once a day under the skin. Wed, June 28, 2017 Incredible medical breakthroughs leading to promising new treatments are just around the corner. Take a look at some of the most recent discoveries. NICE, a health watchdog, said: “Lixisenatide possibly reduces the absorption of paracetamol when given one to four hours before paracetamol. Paracetamol could also interact with anti-coagulants Warfarin, a used to prevent blood clots. NICE said: “The anticoagulant effect of coumarins possibly enhanced by prolonged regular use of paracetamol.” A study published by experts in France investigated the link between Warfarin and paracetamol. The research, published in the journal Haematologica said: “Paracetamol at 4 g daily (a dose higher than that used in clinical practice) Continue reading >>

Fever With Abdominal Pain And Diabetes - Is It Emphysematous Pyelonephritis?

Fever With Abdominal Pain And Diabetes - Is It Emphysematous Pyelonephritis?

Go to: Case Report A 35-year-old female was hospitalised for high fever with chills and rigors and abdominal pain suggestive of urinary infection for the last one week. The pain was in the right upper abdomen and right upper back. Pain was aggravated by deep breathing and relieved on lying on the left lateral position. Patient was under treatment for type II diabetes and was taking met for min 500 mg twice a day (BD) supplemented by insulin 46 IU subcutaneously every day; though not regularly. Patient was treated for cystitis one month ago and had tubectomy 10 years ago. On examination the following was recorded: pulse 100/min, blood pressure (BP) 110/70 mm of Hg, temperature 102°F, respiration 24/min and patient appeared in distress. There was marked tenderness in right lumbar and hypochondriac area. Rest of the examination was normal. Investigations revealed haemoglobin of 9.8 g/dL, total white cell count 7.6 × 109/L; platelet count 50 × 109/L; red blood cells (RBC) were microcytic hypochromic, erythrocyte, sedimentation rate was 28 mm in 1 h, RBC indices were Mean Corpuscular Volume MCV 77.9 fL, Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH) of 24.2 pgl, Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin Concentration (MCHC of 31.0 g/dL, urine analysis revealed ketones of 15 mg/dL, albumin 3+, glucose 3+ and 2 to 3 pus cells/HP. Blood urea was 83 mg/dL and creatinine was 2.0 mg/dL. The HbA1C was 9%; random blood glucose was 456 mg/dL. Arterial blood gas analysis showed mild metabolic acidosis. Total serum bilirubin was 0.6 mg/dL (direct 0.3 mg/dL) .Hepatic transaminases were normal. Serum proteins were 6.3 g/dL with an albumin of 2.9 g/dl. Serum sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, uric acid estimations were normal. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepaitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) test Continue reading >>

Cold, Flu And Other Infections

Cold, Flu And Other Infections

It is a good idea to develop an action plan in anticipation of sick days, with your healthcare team. An acute disease almost always raises blood glucose (sugar) levels because of: the secretion of stress hormones (also known as counterregulatory hormones: primarily cortisol, adrenaline and glucagon), which have an insulin-antagonistic effect; less regular exercise, which makes the injected insulin less effective, even if the amount of food consumed is reduced. Sick days on insulin The daily insulin needs of people with diabetes often rise when they get sick. Consequently, even though diabetics may eat less when ill, they still need to take their regular insulin doses as prescribed, or adjusted, by their doctors. Advice and adjustments Take your blood glucose (sugar) readings more often: every 2-4 hours, or more often if necessary. Take your insulin or diabetes medication as usual, unless advised otherwise by your doctor. Take your temperature: if needed, take acetaminophen to lower your temperature and prevent dehydration through sweating caused by fever. If you have type 1 diabetes: if your blood glucose (sugar) is above 14.0 mmol/L, measure the ketones in your blood or urine every 2 to 4 hours, or more often if necessary. Diet: If you lose your appetite, drink liquid or semi-liquid sources of carbohydrates (fruit sauces, yogurt, etc.) at the rate of 15 g of carbohydrates per hour if you have taken the proper insulin doses. Hydration: If your blood glucose (sugar) level is high: Drink lots of unsweetened liquids (sparkling water, diet soft drinks, bouillon, etc.) to avoid becoming dehydrated, at the rate of 250 ml every hour. If your blood glucose (sugar) levels tend to fall: Have small amounts at a time of sweetened foods (fruit juice, regular Jell-OTM, milk, etc.). S Continue reading >>

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