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Female Hair Loss Diabetes

The Basics Of Balding: Androgenic Alopecia

The Basics Of Balding: Androgenic Alopecia

Balding and hair loss aren't just issues for men — women, too, experience the condition known as alopecia, the general term for hair loss. Androgenic alopecia, also known as androgenetic alopecia, is the most common form of alopecia and it is most prevalent among men. What Is Androgenic Alopecia? Androgenic alopecia is called male pattern hair loss or male pattern baldness; it is often referred to as female diffuse hair loss when it occurs in women. Weigh the Pros and Cons of Different Hair Loss Treatment The most common symptoms of androgenic alopecia are: For men, hair loss at both the hairline and on the crown of the head, often resulting in a noticeable "M" shape on the forehead caused by a receding hairline For women, a gradual process of hair loss, resulting in thinner hair overall, but without the receding hairline experienced by men Androgenic alopecia only causes hair loss on the head, not on other parts of the body. Anyone can get androgenic alopecia, but men experience about 60 percent of the cases, accounting for 35 million men in the United States alone. After the age of 50, more than half of all men have androgenic alopecia to some degree. In women with androgenic alopecia, it most commonly strikes after menopause — affecting up to 40 percent of post-menopausal women by some estimates; it is rare younger in life. Causes of Androgenic Alopecia Androgenic alopecia is an inherited, genetic condition thought to be caused by changes in the levels of hormones, notably androgens, that affect hair growth. Some factors that can cause abnormal androgen levels and balding in women are: Pregnancy Menopause Having ovarian cysts or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Taking oral contraceptives that contain high levels of androgens In men, some factors that are related Continue reading >>

Association Of Androgenetic Alopecia With Mortality From Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Disease

Association Of Androgenetic Alopecia With Mortality From Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Disease

Importance Identifying predictors of mortality from diabetes mellitus (DM) and heart disease can help shape treatment strategies. Presence of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) might be such a predictor. Objective To determine whether the presence of AGA is associated with an elevated rate of mortality from DM and heart disease in both sexes after adjustment for potential confounders. Design A population-based prospective cohort study. Setting Community-based integrated screening in Taiwan. Participants A total of 7252 subjects aged 30 to 95 years participated in the baseline AGA survey using the Norwood and Ludwig classifications between April and June 2005. Baseline information on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and other possible risk factors was also collected. We then followed this cohort over time to ascertain death and cause of death until December 2010. Interventions or Exposures Application of Norwood and Ludwig ALA classifications to study population. Main Outcomes and Measures Deaths from DM and heart disease. Results Among the 7126 subjects (2429 men and 4697 women) who provided complete data, there were 70 deaths from DM and heart disease during the 57-month follow-up period. Subjects with moderate to severe AGA vs normal or mild AGA had a significantly higher risk of mortality from DM (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.97; 95% CI, 1.26-7.01) (P = .01) and heart disease (adjusted HR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.00-5.23) (P = .05) after adjusting for age, family history of DM or heart disease, and MetS. Conclusions and Relevance AGA is an independent predictor of mortality from DM and heart disease in both sexes. This finding may have significant implications for the identification of risk factors for DM and heart disease in patients with moderate or severe AGA, regardless of whether Me Continue reading >>

Will Hair Loss Due To Uncontrolled Diabetes Grow Back?

Will Hair Loss Due To Uncontrolled Diabetes Grow Back?

Question Originally asked by Community Member mo Will Hair Loss Due To Uncontrolled Diabetes Grow Back? I have noticeably thinning hair due to my uncontrolled diabetes. Once I manage my diabetes is there hope for my hair to come back, or will it stay this thin? Answer Hi Mo. I’m sorry to hear about your thin hair and your uncontrolled diabetes. I hope you’re able to get it under control, because if you’re losing hair imagine what damage it’s causing on the inside, where you can’t see the effects! Uncontrolled blood sugar can lead to thinning hair, and many people who get their condition under control and maintain a healthy diet find that their hair does grow back. Check out MyDiabetesCentral.com and feel free to ask others about their experiences with hair loss. Good luck! You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

‘diabetes Can Also Cause Hair Loss’

‘diabetes Can Also Cause Hair Loss’

Diabetes is a curse of the modern society and stress, sedentary lifestyle and fast food have a major part to play in its occurrence. According to the findings of the International Diabetes Federation in 2007, the country with the largest number of people with diabetes is India (40.9 million). WHO has cautioned that India is all set to become the diabetes capital of the world by 2050. Due to our high-calorie/high-fat diets, lack of exercise and stressful lifestyles, diabetes is on the rise, striking people earlier than the usual age. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are more prone than the rest of the general population to damage of the eyes, kidney, nerves, heart and blood vessels. Another lesser known consequence of diabetes is hair loss. Dr Apoorva Shah explains the inter-relation between the two. Diabetes negatively affects the body’s circulatory system. This means that less amount of nutrients and oxygen reach the upper and the lower extremities of the body i.e. the feet and the scalp areas. If diabetes is causing poor blood circulation to the scalp, the hair follicles will die resulting in hair loss. Furthermore, this poor circulation may prevent further hair growth. So not only is diabetes causing the loss of your existing hair, it is also preventing the growth of new ones. Diabetes brings about hormonal imbalance in a patient’s body. These hormonal changes may be manifested through hair loss. This also explains the reason behind hair loss during pregnancy and at menopause. Drugs that are used to treat diabetes may also lead to hair loss. If you feel that particular regimens are causing distressful hair loss, then consult your doctor to get your prescription modified. Diabetes may weaken the immune system, making it susceptible to other diseases. This wea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hairloss

Diabetes And Hairloss

It has been established that there are clear links between androgenetic alopecia, (male and female pattern hair loss), metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Those with diabetes or even pre-diabetic conditions are much more likely to have pattern loss or a diffuse thinning that often accompanies the disorder. In a nutshell, insulin resistance and the resultant pro-inflammatory prostaglandin production, either due to lifestyle, diet or genetics, causes a micro circulatory impairment and collagen rigidification around the hair follicle (fibrosis). Here�s a succinct, well written, ezine article by Mike Harman on diabetes and its relationship to hair loss: "The connection between diabetes and hair loss was established long ago. Diabetes is a hormone related disorder that often leads to hair loss or thinning of the hair. Frequent loss of hair is often considered one of the early symptoms of diabetes, which requires prompt treatment in order to avoid further complications. The growth of hair is affected by diabetes, which gradually leads to thinning of hair. Stress is directly related to diabetes and hair loss, as the disease causes excessive anxiety, which in turn becomes the prime cause of hair loss. Diabetes Leads To Hair Loss: Diabetes occurs when it becomes difficult for the body to metabolize carbohydrates properly. Diabetics are highly sensitive to skin ailments, as their blood circulation and blood sugar levels are impaired. Bruises and small wounds often take a relatively long time to heal; therefore, the recovery rate is comparatively slower and obstructs the re-growth of hair. This causes visible hair reduction, as diabetics cannot maintain the normal cycle of re-growth process. Bacterial and fungal infections on the scalp because of diabetes could also resul Continue reading >>

Illnesses Or Medical Conditions.

Illnesses Or Medical Conditions.

Baldness or hair loss is usually something only adults need to worry about. But sometimes teens lose their hair, too — and it may be a sign that something's going on. Hair loss during adolescence can mean a person may be sick or just not eating right. Some medicines or medical treatments (like chemotherapy ) also cause hair loss. People can even lose their hair if they wear a hairstyle (like braids) that pulls on the hair for a long time. Losing hair can be stressful. Most of the time, hair loss during the teen years is temporary. With temporary hair loss, the hair usually grows back after the problem that causes it is corrected. Hair Basics Hair is made of a kind of protein called keratin. A single hair has a hair shaft (the part that shows), a root below the skin, and a follicle. The follicle is the place the hair root grows from. At the lower end of the follicle is the hair bulb. This is where the hair's color pigment, or melanin, is produced. Most people lose about 50 to 100 head hairs a day. These hairs are replaced — they grow back in the same follicle on your head. This amount of hair loss is totally normal and no cause for worry. If you're losing more than that, though, something might be wrong. If you have hair loss and don't know what's causing it, talk to your doctor. A doctor can determine why the hair is falling out and suggest a treatment that will correct the underlying problem, if necessary. What Causes Hair Loss? Here are some of the things that can cause hair loss in teens: Endocrine (hormonal) conditions, such as uncontrolled diabetes or thyroid disease, can interfere with hair production and cause hair loss. People with lupus can also lose hair. The hormone imbalance that happens in polycystic ovary syndrome can cause hair loss in teen girls as w Continue reading >>

Help — I’m Losing My Hair!

Help — I’m Losing My Hair!

When I was younger, everyone wanted Farrah Fawcett’s hairstyle. Jennifer Aniston popularized “The Rachel” haircut on the hit show Friends. And we’re all seeing men sporting “man buns” alongside women. Hair is a big deal in our culture. Hair has figured prominently in history, too. The Bible tells us that Samson garnered his strength from his long hair, and lost that strength when Delilah cut it off. Priests and monks used to shave the crowns of their head to show a lack of vanity and symbolize their vow of chastity. Over the centuries, different cultures have upheld norms about hair: for example, the Mohawk hairstyle that we’ve all seen stems from Pawnee Native American nation of the Midwest. People in some African tribes shave their heads as, for example, a sign of mourning or marital status. We value our hair. Who doesn’t view a head full of lush, shiny hair as a symbol of health, success, and confidence? Our hair is tied closely to our identity. We talk about “good” and “bad” hair days. And when we walk out of that salon with our hair freshly styled, it feels like we’re on top of the world. Hair-loss statistics According to the American Hair Loss Association, by the age of 35, two-thirds of men will have some degree of hair loss; by age 50, about 85% of men will have significant thinning of their hair. Hair loss is prevalent in women, too — they make up 40% of hair-loss sufferers. Thanks to society’s pressure to be attractive, hair loss can have a major negative effect on quality of life. Hair loss can be devastating, leading to loss of confidence, poor self-image, and even depression. Alopecia areata There are many causes of hair loss, including thyroid issues, hormonal changes, scalp infections, certain medications, chemotherapy, and r Continue reading >>

Hair - A Yardstick For Diabetes

Hair - A Yardstick For Diabetes

Sir, Hair of a person may represent an easily accessible and non- invasive tissue for the study of hyperglycemia. Assessing the amount of glycation in hair apart from being readily acceptable to the patients provides fairly accurate and reliable information regarding the degree, the duration of hyperglycemia, and the associated microvascular complications. Unlike glycosylated hemoglobin that mirrors glycemic control preceding 8 to 12 weeks, analysis of hair-glycation can help one to monitor the diabetic's metabolic balance for longer time periods. A study showed a significant correlation between glycosylation of the proximal 4 cm of hair (representing 16 weeks at an assumed average rate of hair growth of 0.37 mm/day) and the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).[1] The level of glycosylation of hair is known to be independent of duration of the disease, age, sex, and race of the patient and color of the hair. Being stable along the length of the hair from scalp to tip, a sufficiently long hair sample enables us to record a long term record of degree of hyperglycemia. Hair samples of 12 cm long may correspond to about one year's tissue glycosylation and diabetic microvascular complications. A novel dot-block immunochemical assay of hair of diabetics showed significant correlations in amounts of blood glucose (BG) vs. HbA1c, BG vs. early glycation products (EGAs) and HbA1c vs. EGAs. In the same study, type1 diabetics of acute onset displayed nearly similar EGAs levels in their proximal 0-9 cm hair as did type1 diabetics with long-established diabetes. This reinforces the notion of long and insidious etiology of type 1 diabetes.[2] Proteic sulphur levels and furosine in the hair diabetics also closely correlate with HbA1c. Significant rate of hair loss may reflect impaired glyc Continue reading >>

Female Pattern Hair Loss: A Clinical And Pathophysiological Review

Female Pattern Hair Loss: A Clinical And Pathophysiological Review

INTRODUCTION Etymologically, the word "alopecia" comes from the Greek ἀλώπηξ (alōpēx) , which means "fox". It is an allusion to the constant hair loss suffered by these animals during life. According to the Brazilian-Portuguese Spelling Vocabulary (VOLP), alopecia should not be marked with an accent (paroxytone stress) due to the influence of Latin (alopecia). The term is also registered this way among the health science descriptors (DECS) for scientific indexing in Brazil.1-3 The description of the classical clinical pattern of baldness in men is known since antiquity. As an example, we may cite Hippocrates' (400 BC) observation that eunuchs did not develop baldness. Later, Joseph Plenck, in his book "Doctrina de Morbis Cutaneis" (Vienna, 1776) (Vienna, 1776) identified, in these cases, the miniaturization of hair follicles, which he called "calvities". He also distinguished the disease in two ways, according to its extension: universalem e partialem; and in ten ways according to its cause: febrisequa, puerperarum, morborum exantematicorum, acrimoniosa, phtisicorum, a debilitate nervosa, fenum, hereditaria, a vapore mercurii and a caufa externa.4 However, the diffuse balding process (affecting mainly women) still causes confusion in its nomenclature nowadays.5 Initially, the term "diffuse alopecia in women" was widely used to characterize the disease.6,7 After 1942, when Hamilton demonstrated of the involvement of male hormones in the development of classic pattern baldness in men, the term androgenetic alopecia was established to emphasize the hormonal and genetic factors associated with the development of the disease.8,9 Because diffuse pattern alopecia (which often affects women) was thought to be a variant of the same entity, the term female androgenic alo Continue reading >>

Receding Hairline, Diet And Insulin: The Surprising Hair Loss Link

Receding Hairline, Diet And Insulin: The Surprising Hair Loss Link

Is “natural hair loss” really so natural as we age? Maybe not always. Genetics play a strong role in receding hairlines and male pattern baldness (MPB). However, like with many things, genes aren’t the whole story. In fact, emerging science suggests that diet plays a significant role and that insulin is a primary driver behind hair loss. Additionally, there is even a link between early balding and cardiovascular disease. This article takes a look at what connects these things, the causes of hair loss, and how we can potentially reverse them – naturally. What Is a Receding Hairline and Male Pattern Baldness? The medical name ‘androgenic alopecia’ refers to the permanent loss of hair from the scalp. A receding hairline is the progressive loss of hair men experience. This loss of hair initially occurs around the temple area, on both sides of the forehead. The hair around this area begins to thin, and then gradually recedes. A bald spot may then develop on the top of the head, which eventually leads to a ‘horseshoe’ shaped head of hair. In women, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) tends to progressively develop on the top of the head and the crown. People have long hypothesized that genetics are behind hair loss, but as with many medical conditions, research hints that our lifestyle interacts with these genes. The Role of DHT The hormone DHT (dihydrotestosterone) plays a causative role in thinning hair, and it is a derivative of the male hormone testosterone (1, 2). But a point often overlooked is the underlying factors which cause excess amounts of this hormone; we will look into this later in the article. Age-related hair loss is much more common in men due to their naturally higher testosterone levels. Key Point: Progressive hair loss—otherwise known as an Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Hair Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Hair Loss

It’s been known for a while that there’s a link between type 2 diabetes and hair loss. In fact, shedding hair is often one of the first noticeable symptoms for people suffering from the disease. Theories abound about why the two things are linked from the fact that diabetes drugs might be causing the side effect of hair loss to the existence of other auto-immune diseases. Low cortisol could be the culprit A new theory points to the adrenal glands which gradually become compromised when the liver becomes fatty and “sluggish”. Instead of producing cortisol the stressed adrenal glands begin to produce more adrenalin which can cause anxiety. Low cortisol is one of the contributory factors to male and female hair loss. So, what can be done? The main focus for anyone suffering from Type 2 diabetes should be to tackle the disease first and worry about the hair loss second. After all the two conditions may or not be related and diabetes is a serious illness. The only effective way to tackle the disease is to embark on a change of lifestyle. Normally this means switching to a high protein, high fat, low carb intake (along the lines of the Atkins diet) which should help to reduce blood sugar levels. Speak to a hair loss clinic Once the diet’s moving in the right direction then it’s quite possible that hair loss will start to reduce but there are plenty of treatments to tackle this problem separately. Speaking to a reputable hair loss clinic is often a good first step to establish what’s the best way to approach your hair loss. These specialists will be able to advise on the full array of available products and treatments from a position of experience. In some cases, they might recommend hair loss drugs but equally they will be able to provide detailed information ab Continue reading >>

Faqs: How Does Diabetes Affect My Hair Growth?

Faqs: How Does Diabetes Affect My Hair Growth?

Diabetes is a lifelong condition in which the body's blood sugar levels are too high. Worldwide, 371 million people have diabetes, and that figure is expected to grow to 552 million by 2030. There are two types of diabetes - type 1 and type 2 - with different causes, symptoms, and treatment methods, but one symptom both types share is hair loss. What's The Difference between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease diagnosed primarily in those under 40 - usually children and young adults - where the pancreas gland does not produce any insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls blood glucose levels, and without it, glucose levels can become too high or too low, which damages the body's organs, blood vessels, and nerves, and if it goes without proper treatment, it can result in a coma or death. However, type 1 diabetes can be managed with insulin injections and close attention to blood sugar levels, although it cannot be completely cured. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs later in life, when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to control glucose levels, or body cells become resistant to insulin. Unlike type 1, it can be triggered by obesity, when excess abdominal fat releases chemicals that disrupt the body's metabolic and cardiovascular systems. 90% of all diabetes cases are type 2, and the condition is usually managed - and sometimes reversed - with a healthy diet and tablets; insulin injections are normally unnecessary. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which cannot be prevented, type 2 diabetes can generally be prevented by maintaining a healthy weight and eating a healthy diet. How Does Diabetes Cause Hair Loss? While researchers are unsure precisely how diabetes leads to hair loss, there are two likely causes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimm Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hair Loss

Diabetes Hair Loss

Diabetes hair loss is one of the many side effects that this illness can have for the diabetic. There are many symptoms of adult onset diabetes (type 2) which is the most prevalent type of the illness in America. It is estimated that over six percent of all Americans, over twenty million persons, suffer from this dangerous and non-curable disease. But the good news is that through careful diet and exercise along with weight loss diabetics can control many of the effects of the disease. But included in this preliminary discussion about diabetes is the fact that many people don't know that they are diabetic. Here are some of the symptoms of onset diabetes, the kind that just creeps up on a person over time: frequent urination, excessive thirst, extreme hunger, unusual weight being lossed, increased fatigue, irritability and blurry vision. Oh yes, there is one more: those beautiful tresses- that thick mane that is your trademark might begin to fall out. How is that for a kick in the teeth? Diabetes hair loss might occur when one's immune system is weakened, causing infections including one's to the scalp which causes hair to fall out. The illness may affect follicles that don't get enough nutrition from circulatory problems caused by the diabetic condition. Women are prone to lose hair when they are diabetic because of hormonal changes brought on by diabetic imbalances in the system. There is no doubt that diabetes really is a life changing event with the need to permanently change diets, get daily exercise, and test blood glucose levels several times each day. For some people, getting the diagnosis of such an illness and facing something like diabetes hair loss can seem like the most important thing in the world, but Jesus said there is something even more important. "For Continue reading >>

Rogaine And Diabetes?

Rogaine And Diabetes?

I would like to know if rogaine (5%) is contraindicated for use in type 2 diabetics, if so then why? thank you in advance. (BTW the site is very well done, nice to see doctors who are in touch with technology.) Rogaine (minoxidil) is not contraindicated for diabetics. Rogaine is for hair growth and has nothing to do with insulin production or diabetes. Always check with your doctor before starting or stopping any medication as BaldingBlog is not a source for personal medical information or recommendations. Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hair To Fall Out?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hair To Fall Out?

One way in which diabetes can cause hair loss is a result of the effects of high blood sugar on the circulatory system. Diabetics typically have higher than normal blood sugar levels. High blood sugar can chemically react with red blood cells, creating a product known as glycosylated hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an important protein in red blood cells and this modified version causes red blood cells to be misshapen. These misshapen red blood cells are not as flexible and can get stuck when trying to enter small blood vessels (called capillaries), leading to circulation problems. If this occurs in the capillaries that supply blood to the hair follicles, these follicles may die, leading to hair loss. Endocrine Abnormalities Another way in which diabetes can cause hair loss is by disrupting the endocrine system. The endocrine system is comprised of many hormones that control different tissues in the body. For example, the endocrine system secretes androgens, which govern hair growth and the health of hair follicles. Uncontrolled diabetes (and the resulting high blood sugar) causes the endocrine system to become disrupted. This can lead to androgen abnormalities, which can cause the hair follicles to go dormant. As a result, the shafts of the hair fall out, which can lead to widespread hair loss. Fortunately, if the diabetes is controlled (through diet and medication), the hormone levels can become stabilized, allowing the hair to grow back. Diabetes can also have an indirect effect on hair loss as a result of autoimmune disorders. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system accidentally attacks healthy tissue because it misidentifies the tissue as foreign. This can be one cause of diabetes, because the immune system can attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, le Continue reading >>

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