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Feline Diabetes Support Groups

Pet Diabetes Easy Reference List

Pet Diabetes Easy Reference List

This Pet Diabetes website is designed to give you quick reference to URL links that may answer many of your questions. Beginner's Overview: ultimate beginner's page just learned your pet has diabetes is Diabetes? by Peter A. Graham BVMS, PhD, CertVR, MRCVS Diabetes Information from the College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University Diabetes manual for veterinarians published by Vetsulin General Information Diabetes General Information about Diabetes Canine Diabetes: Lots of information on canine diabetes and support groups to join. the webpages from the former www.petdiabetes.org *Backup copy of the former www.petdiabetes.org and the above url petdiabetes.com (in case you are looking for a link ) * FAQ by Vetsulin Cost of having a diabetic pet: Diabetes Dictionary *An explanation of diabetic and medical terms you will hear *Glossary and abbreviations Diabetic Health Issues/Questions: Hypoglycemia and when to use Karo syrup *Hypoglycemia Ketoacidosis - DKA on ENCYCLOPEDIA, then DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS Somogyi Phenomenon *Somogyi Phenomenon Phenomenon Vetsulin users Diet/Nutrition: meals and treats by different owners for home cooking and boughten foods fed by owners of diabetic pets page of recipes fed by owners of diabetic pets and tips from petdiabetes.org database containing nutrition analysis *Not all carbs are created equal. The best carbs are low-glycemic. and Naturopathic Herbs for dogs – Chinaroad Lowchens of Australia *Great calorie calculators *More diabetic cat food choices of treats by sugar content files on Cat food by Michael Smith files on Dog food by Michael Smith on most commercial dog foods comparison of Hill's W/D, Purina DCO, Royal Canin Vet Diet E-mail lists and Message Boards for diabetic pets: Join the pet diabetes email group today! * Continue reading >>

"feline Diabetes": Pet Health Community - Support Group

These message boards are closed to posting. Please head onover to our new WebMD Message Boards to check out and participate in the greatconversations taking place: Your new WebMD Message Boards are now open! 1. Head over to this page: 2. Choose the tag from the drop-down menu thatclicks most with you (and add it to any posts you create so others can easilyfind and sort through posts) I've just learned my 4 yr old cat, Harry, has feline diabetes. I'm concerned about his sibling Ron. Is he predisposed to get it too?Also, anyone know of alternative treatments to the insulin? Your reply violates WebMD's rules. The issue ishighlighted in red. Please correct the issue, then click Submit. Post my content anonymously (without my username) Put this on my watchlist and alert me by email to new posts Fortunately, there is no known hereditary predisposition to becoming diabetic. The most common cause of diabetes in cats is obesity (sound familiar?) but there are also some drugs can can increase the chances of diabetes.While there are no alternative therapies for diabetes that are proven to work, there are diets specifically formulated for diabetic cats that sometimes control their symptoms and occasionally reverse the disease (yes, it can go away entirely in some cats.) This is appropriate to try in diabetic cats that are stable, meaning they're eating well, maintaining their weight, and staying hydrated. A diabetic cat that is not stable needs to go on insulin as soon as possible.Insulin is the main medication for treating diabetes, but there are many different kinds of insulin. There's a newer one, called glargine insulin, that may increase the likelihood of resolving your cat's diabetes. It's very expensive but if his diabetes resolves, it will be much less expensive in the lon Continue reading >>

How To Care For A Diabetic Cat

How To Care For A Diabetic Cat

Expert Reviewed Three Parts:Providing Everyday CareGiving Your Cat an Insulin InjectionMonitoring Your Cat's HealthCommunity Q&A Finding out that your cat is suffering from diabetes can be both frightening and overwhelming. Some owners may wonder how they can help their cat manage the disease. Although it might be overwhelming at first, taking care of a diabetic cat is completely manageable. If you catch the disease early enough, you may even be able to reverse it with proper care. If your cat has diabetes there are several steps you can take. You can manage their everyday care, learn how to give insulin injections, and learn about the signs to watch out for in diabetic cats. 1 Feed your cat the proper diet. Most people know that human diabetics have to be careful what they eat, and this is also the case with cats. The ideal cat diet is rich in protein and low in carbohydrates. Unfortunately, most cat foods you find at the supermarket will be high in carbs and low in protein. You'll need a cat food geared for your cat's needs.[1] Many premium pet food companies offer high protein prescription diets. These companies include Purina, Hills, and Royal Canin. The Purina diet, DM, comes in wet and dry varieties. As long as the cat has free access to drinking water, either formulation is fine. Feeding your cat a protein-dense diet will help your cat’s body reduce the amount of excess glucose it produces. This will help your cat’s body to stabilize itself. Some cats may not need anything more than switching to a high-quality, protein-dense diet. These cats may even go back to normal after a few months of this new diet. 2 Create a feeding schedule. Until recently, many believed that the best time to feed a diabetic cat was directly after an insulin injection. However, scient Continue reading >>

Links | Veterinarians In Portland | Cat Care Professionals

Links | Veterinarians In Portland | Cat Care Professionals

In addition to our Pet Health Articles , we have provided the following links to websites that provide great information on a variety of topics related to feline veterinary medicine and general care. American Association of Feline Practitioners The AAFP is like the American Medical Association for cat veterinarians and provides a lot of information regarding feline health. Cat Breeds For information on different cat breeds Catios Cats Safe at Home is a website dedicated to helping reduce the number of outdoor cats in the Portland area by providing information about catios, indoor enrichment, and more! Cornell Veterinary School Useful information about general health care for cats Feline Asthma This website is full of information to help those managing cats with asthma. Feline Chronic Kidney Disease and IRIS-kidney These websites provide information and support for the owners of cats living with chronic kidney disease. Feline Diabetes If you are caring for a cat with diabetes, this site offers a wealth of information and support from others whose cats have diabetes. Feline Heartworms This website offers great information about heartworm disease in cats. Feline Pharmacy Many of the latest treatments for cats are available through our online pharmacy . If you are looking for a local pharmacy, or need medications in a hurry, we trust Northwest Compounders to make our special cat formulations and their customer service is great too! Feral Cat Coalition If you care for a feral cat colony or just care about feral cats, check out this nonprofit organization dedicated to helping feral cats in Oregon. Home Again Pet ID and Recovery System With this pet ID system, you can greatly increase the chances that your pet will be returned home safely if they were to get lost. Homemade Ca Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes Resources On The Web

Feline Diabetes Resources On The Web

Fall 2005 Introduction Diabetes mellitus is more likely to strike a cat in the later years than earlier in life (Cornell Feline Health Center, 1996). It has become so common that there are countless online resources available to supplement veterinary care through education, advice, and emotional support. The aim of this paper is to find the best of these online resources, sort them out and summarize them as to provide a quick and useful guide to the cat owner overwhelmed by the wealth of information on feline diabetes available on the Internet. Please remember as you review this information that these resources are no replacement for veterinary advice and care. Diabetes is a serious and potentially fatal disease that must be diagnosed and managed by a veterinarian. After a brief overview of feline diabetes, you will find links to websites divided into three categories: Those that provide a brief, general overview of the disease or a resource for further research, those that focus on management and treatment of the disease in detail, and those that are comprehensive and provide emotional support in addition to diabetes education. Support in this case may be via a discussion forum, message board or e-mail group where cat owners can ask questions and communicate with others online. What is Feline Diabetes? Feline diabetes is a disease of the endocrine (hormone) system (Pierson, 2005). It is characterized by a deficiency of insulin and the inability to process glucose. Insulin is a hormone that signals cells to take up glucose from the blood. When insulin is deficient, the glucose stays in the blood and the cells do not have enough glucose to use as energy (Price, 2005). What Causes Diabetes? Many veterinarians believe that a high carbohydrate diet and obesity are the prima Continue reading >>

Feline Health Resource Links

Feline Health Resource Links

Dr. Lisa Piersons CatInfo.org article FEEDING TUBES SAVE LIVES On hyperthyroidism and the prescription diet, Hills y/d : Dr. Petersons Animal Endocrine Clinic website blog Raw Feeding for IBD Cats website (created by Food Fur Life co-founders). Focused on treating the underlying cause of IBD and alternative symptom management control. Raw Feeding for IBD Cats Facebook Group (created by Food Fur Life co-founders). IBDkitties.net website , focused on IBD and related inflammatory diseases, including standard symptom management. IBDkitties.net website page on pancreatitis The information provided through our www.foodfurlife.com website is informational and educational. We are here to help make feeding a properly balanced homemade diet to your pet simple and to provide guidance for some of the problems that can crop up when transitioning your pets to a new food. But please be advised, we are not veterinarians. Food Fur Life LLC will not be held responsible for any adverse reactions your pet might experience based on the information on our website, nor can Food Fur Life LLC be held responsible for any problems due to using our product in any manner other than as directed. The health of your pet is 100% in your hands. We expect you to use your knowledge of your pet and your circumstances to determine, with the knowledge and input of your trusted veterinarian, whether any advice provided on this site is appropriate for your pet. Continue reading >>

The Feline Diabetes Epidemic

The Feline Diabetes Epidemic

Diabetes in humans has reached epidemic proportions, and sadly, this trend also affects our cats. Diabetes affects as many as 1 in 50 cats, with overweight cats being especially prone to the disease. Diabetes results from inadequate production of insulin by the pancreas or an inadequate response of the cells to insulin. Without insulin, the body cant utilize glucose. This results in elevated blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). In diabetic cats, excess glucose is eliminated by the kidneys, producing frequent urination. This in turn leads to increased water consumption to compensate for the increased urination. There are three types of diabetes in cats: Type I: Cats are insulin dependent and need to receive daily insulin injections because the pancreas is not making enough insulin. Type II: The pancreas may make enough insulin but the body cannot utilize it properly. This is the most common type of feline diabetes. Some of these cats will require daily insulin injections, but in some cases, the condition can be controlled with oral medications or even just a change in diet. Type III: This is known as transient diabetes. These are cats who have type II diabetes. They may require insulin initially, but go into remission over time as their system regulates itself. While diabetes can affect any cat, it mostly presents in older, or overweight cats. The four classic signs noticed by most cat owners are an increased, almost ravenous appetite, weight loss, increased urination, and increased water consumption. Diabetes is diagnosed with a thorough physical exam and laboratory testing of blood and urine. If the cats glucose is elevated, a second blood test, called a fructosamine, will provide more detailed information. Diabetes is treated with a combination of diet, insulin, or or Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes Mellitus: Keys To Remission

Feline Diabetes Mellitus: Keys To Remission

Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy for middle age and geriatric cats. The majority of feline diabetics develop hyperglycemia due to a combination of both decreased insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues.1 As a result, the presence of remaining beta cell function in most feline patients allows for potential remission if the disease is promptly diagnosed and effective glycemic control is achieved. As the concept of diabetic remission has become more obtainable in many patients, the focus on insulin therapy, appropriate diet, and monitoring have become a mainstay of feline diabetic management. Diabetic remission is euglycemia achieved in a diabetic patient without the need for exogenous insulin. Persistent hyperglycemia results in glucotoxicity to pancreatic beta cells, resulting in continuing dysfunction.2 If hyperglycemia is controlled with long-acting exogenous insulin administration, Beta cells may recover function in some feline patients, allowing for adequate insulin production and secretion endogenously. Clinicians should focus on insulin, diet, and monitoring to optimize the chance of diabetic remission. Insulin Twice daily administration of an insulin with a duration of effect lasting 10-14 hours in cats, such as protamine zinc insulin (Prozinc, Boehringer Ingelheim), glargine (Lantus, sanofi-aventis) or detemir (Levemir, Novo Nordisk) results in improved remission compared to intermediate acting insulin (e.g., lente insulin).3 Bennett et al found that protamine zinc insulin (PZI, Boehringer Ingelheim) treatment in combination with a low carbohydrate-low fiber diet resulted in a 68% remission rate.4 Multiple investigations of glargine on remission rates in feline diabetes have resulted in vari Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Dealing With Diabetes In Cats

6 Tips For Dealing With Diabetes In Cats

Dealing with diabetes in cats isnt as scary as it seems. One writer who parents a diabetic cat has six simple tips for dealing with feline diabetes. Cat Behavior Caterwauling What Is It and Why Do Cats Do It? I plan to bring a new cat into my family.Shes a beautiful girl who has the very appropriate name Bella (short for Belladonna). Shes particularly special because she has feline diabetes. Shell need ongoing care and attention for the rest of her life, but Ive found that the basics of keeping a diabetic cat healthy are not very scary at all. Heres what Ive learned about diabetes in cats so far: 1. Diet is crucialwhen dealing with diabetes in cats Ensuring that your cat is on the right diet is crucial to managing diabetes in cats. Photography sae1010 | Thinkstock. Diabetic cats shouldnt eat dry food . Most vets recommend a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet for diabetic cats, and no dry food is low in carbohydrates. Even grain-free dry foods contain a lot of substitute carbohydrates such as potatoes, peas or tapioca. Carbohydrates tend to make blood sugar levels fluctuate quite a bit. The shelter where Im adopting my Bella has had cats that became diet-controlled and no longer needed insulin when they began eating low-carb food. There are low-carbohydrate foods available at every price point, so you dont have to buy super-expensive food to feed your diabetic cat properly. Curious about what people with diabetes should and shouldnt eat ? Check out this article >> 2. Home testing isnt as hard as it seems Like diabetic humans, cats withfeline diabetes need to have their blood glucose tested regularly. You can do this at home with a standard glucometer and testing strips that you can buy in a drugstore. Record your cats blood glucose level, along with the date and time, Continue reading >>

Welcome To The Sugar Cat Support Group

Welcome To The Sugar Cat Support Group

Post by Mel&TheFurGang on Dec 30, 2014 1:35:47 GMT Welcome to Sugar Cat Support Group. We are a group of owners treating our cats that just happen to have Feline Diabetes. This is a social gathering place where we discuss what is or has worked for our own Sugar Cats, what hasn't worked in the past and how to balance our own social and personal life with the care of our diabetic cats. While managing care for a diabetic cat can at times be very stressful, it helps to know you are not alone in this journey with your beloved cat. That there are others all over the world that are also living, breathing, eating and sleeping with Feline Diabetes. The good news is that this disease is completely manageable at home just like in human diabetics with just a few little tweaks to your daily routine, your cat can go on to live a long, happy and healthy life on insulin and many even go off insulin injections all together and become a diet controlled diabetic. The 3 keys to treating Feline Diabetes are: Diet: We promote feeding a low carb/high protein all canned or better yet raw diet. Our reasoning for this is that cats are obligated carnivores, their systems are designed to eat meat and only meat. Plus dry food is extremely dehydrating in an animal that by nature has a very low thirst drive. This constant state of dehydration can also cause other health problems in older cats. The only grain a cat should be consuming has already been processed by a bird or mouse first. Insulin Therapy: Currently on the market there are several different insulins being prescribe for use in cats. The best ones are Lantus, Levemir, and Prozinc/PZI these are long lasting and very gentle insulins. Most of the other types of insulin make regulation more difficult as the cause steep drops in BGs early on a Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes

Feline Diabetes

As always, your veterinarian should be your first reource for medical issues. Your vet will help you establish a workable protocol and can discuss your concerns. In addition, you will likely get your initial supplies and insulin from your vet. Once your ca's protocol is stable, you might find much cheaper sources for supplies and insulin. Following the web site and discussion group resources specified below will help you fmanage your diabetes budget. The Feline Diabetes web site has been around since 1996 and is a wonderful resource with information on all aspects for caing for feline diabetics. There is also a discussion board where you can discuss concerns and trade hints with other owners of diabetic cats. This web site is a great place to start if you are new to diabetes. Cornell University of College of Veterinary medicine has a brief, but informative article on feline diabetes. They also have a nice online video on caring for a diabetic cat. You can find some good ideas for saving money and making your life easier on the Feline Outrreach web site. Felinediabetes For owners of cats with feline diabetes is a high-volume (average of 7 messages/day) Yahoo! Group with over 500 members. It is an excellent resource. THe Feline Diabetes web site has its own forum . Google Groups provides web-based access to a high-volume Netnews group for discussion of feline diabetes. Note that this list often averages more than 100 message/day. Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes Mellitus Updates On Diagnosis & Treatment

Feline Diabetes Mellitus Updates On Diagnosis & Treatment

Feline Diabetes MellitusUpdates on Diagnosis & Treatment David Bruyette, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM, and Karen Eiler, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVIM Feline diabetes mellitus, one of the most commonly encountered feline endocrine diseases, is comprehensively reviewed, with an emphasis on providing up-to-date information on diagnosis and treatment based on current literature and research. The article outlines the insulins available for therapeutic use in cats and the nuances of each; a table provides insulin doses. Pathogenesis, diagnostics, other management modalities, and monitoring are also addressed. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a commonly encountered feline endocrine disease.1DM is defined aspersistent hyperglycemia and glycosuria due to an absolute or relative insulin deficiency.The most common causes of feline DM are: Insulin is secreted exclusively from beta cells in the pancreas Islets of Langerhans. Insulin deficiency occurs when beta cells are destroyed or their function impaired, and the pathogenesis of beta cell dysfunction is used to classify DM. Type I (insulin dependent):Results from autoimmune damage to the Islets; associated with complete lack of insulin Type II (noninsulin dependent):Characterized by abnormal insulin secretion and peripheral insulin resistance Gestational, congenital, neonatal, or monogenic. Most feline diabetics have type II DM,2and may have underlying susceptibilities to this type due to genetic predisposition and decreased insulin sensitivity (seen with obesity).3,4 Type III DMis similar to impaired glucose tolerance in humans. Medications or diabetogenic hormones (epinephrine, cortisol, glucagon, and growth hormone) interfere with the action of insulin, result in glucose intolerance, and ultimately lead to DM. This is in distinction to Type II DM Continue reading >>

Tanya's Comprehensive Guide To Feline Chronic Kidney Disease - Tanya's Support Group

Tanya's Comprehensive Guide To Feline Chronic Kidney Disease - Tanya's Support Group

Tanya's Feline CKD Support Group is a group I have set up for people with a CKD cat to offer support and hope to each other during the bad times and to celebrate the good times together. It's been going for over ten years now, and is a small, friendly supportive place. Membership is open to anyone who wants to help their CKD cat - we don't care about your race, religion, nationality or anything like that, all that matters is that you love your cat and are willing to be polite and kind to other members. There are a lot of different types of groups available online, and if you are not used to how online groups work, you may find it a little confusing at first, so this page explains more about how the group works and how to join it. Don't worry, it's not as complicated as it might appear! It is an online group which is completely free to use. The group is hosted on groups.io, and has its own website separate from Tanya's website. You can either click here or copy and paste this link into your browser: I own and run the group, but I am ably assisted by two moderators, Anne V and Anne A. They help with membership queries, approve messages, and do lots of boring admin stuff behind the scenes to help the group run smoothly for the members. For most people, the most important part of the group is its message section, or forum. The group has two forums: CKD Support - the main and busiest group, for people trying to help their CKD cat; CKD Loss - a sub-group which is for those grieving the loss of any cat, not just a CKD cat. On On the CKD Support forum you can ask for support, vet recommendations, or hear how others are coping with a particular problem. Other members then respond if they can. All messages sent to the group are stored in a message archive which members can searc Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes Is Not A Death Sentence: Help Is Available

Feline Diabetes Is Not A Death Sentence: Help Is Available

When I adopted my cat, Belladonna, I knew she had diabetes. That made it easier for me to learn what I need to do to keep her healthy and be emotionally and financially prepared to take care of her special needs. However, a lot of people find out their cat is diabetic because they have a medical crisis or because routine blood work shows something out of the ordinary. For these people, a diabetes diagnosis can often be overwhelming. Sometimes they may even think they have to have their cats euthanized because the disease is not curable and they dont think they can manage their kittys care. But the good news is that diabetes is not a death sentence! Its a very manageable disease, and there are groups out there that can help you get through the difficult time of diagnosis and adjustment to the lifestyle changes inherent in taking care of a diabetic cat. One of those groups is Diabetic Cats in Need . Ive been volunteering for DCIN for the past couple of years, and Ive seen firsthand what they do to help diabetic cats and their people. I first learned about DCIN when I adopted Belladonna. DCIN contributed testing supplies, syringes and insulin to the shelter, and everyone who adopted a diabetic cat was gifted with all of those things as a starter kit to help them get off on the right foot caring for their sugar kitty. Bellas been in remission since about two weeks after I adopted her, and I wrote about how I got her off the juice in a post in my own blog . DCIN offers education to people whose cats have diabetes. Volunteers are available to help with understanding the illness and find diabetic cat caretakers who can provide lessons in home blood glucose testing (which is a crucial part of keeping a diabetic cat healthy). Another important part of DCINs work is financial as Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

Overview Understanding Diabetes Types of Diabetes What Insulin Does for the Body Classical Signs of Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosing Diabetes What It Means for Your Cat to be Diabetic Treatment About Insulin Monitoring Hypoglycemia Spontaneous Remission Overview Treating a diabetic cat can often be a challenge. In some cats, it can be very difficult to maintain steady diabetic regulation. However, there are several important concepts that make this process much more likely to be successful. Consistency: Our goal is to find an appropriate dose of insulin that will last on a long-term basis. In order to do that, we must eliminate as many variables as possible. In other words, the more things that can stay the same from one day to the next, the easier it is to keep a diabetic regulated. Our goal is to give the same dose of insulin the same times each day, to feed the same food in the same quantities each day, to keep the activity level the same each day, and to keep your cat's stress level the same. Tight control is usually not necessary in cats. Human diabetics must maintain blood glucose values very close to normal at all times. If they don't, they will develop some disastrous complications of diabetes, such as loss of fingers, toes, feet, and hands, kidney failure, heart problems, and cataract formation. These complications are rare in diabetic cats. Therefore, as stated below, it is safer for a cat's blood glucose to be too high than too low. Hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) is almost always better than hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). As the dose of insulin goes up, the blood glucose goes down. Food intake causes the blood glucose to rise. Failure to eat may allow the blood glucose to fall below normal. The latter three above principles are applied as such: If you are Continue reading >>

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