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Fatigue Diabetes

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most common disabling diabetes symptoms. Diabetes fatigue can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? We’ve written about fatigue before and received tons of great comments on those posts. But this time let’s go deeper and find the whole range of causes and solutions, even if it takes a few weeks. Hopefully, everyone will find something that might help them, because this is a serious problem. For example, Melanie wrote, “[Fatigue] really takes a toll on my family and things we can do. I just want to have the energy to play with my son and to do things around the house or with friends…I can’t drive more than 30 minutes because my husband is afraid I will fall asleep…and wreck [the car]. (I have dozed while driving before.)” Maria commented, “Fatigue is a constant and I have had to learn to do only what I can. I don’t push myself anymore as I pay for it dearly. I get tired of explaining why I don’t feel good, don’t want to do anything. Some understand and some don’t.” And Jan wrote, “I sleep from midnight to noon each day. Then I get depressed because I wasted half a day.” Because of my multiple sclerosis (MS), I live with fatigue sometimes, and I know how limiting it is. I know how difficult it can be to manage. There are more than 15 known causes for fatigue. It helps to figure out what is causing yours, so you can address it. Here are some possibilities. First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Margaret commented, “I can tell if my sugars are high in the morning, because ‘grogg Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the commonest and most disabling diabetes symptoms. Exhaustion can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. • Low sugars levels also cause fatigue, because when blood sugar is low, there is not enough fuel for the cells to work well. • In addition, high blood glucose can cause fatigue through inflammation. Blood vessels get inflamed by the sugar. When this happens, according to new research, immune cells called monocytes come into the brain, causing fatigue. Other medical conditions can also cause fatigue, like… • Anemia, or low red blood cell counts. • Low thyroid (“hypothyroidism”) — people with diabetes are more likely than others to have thyroid problems. If your thyroid level is low, you are likely to feel tired, sleepy, and depressed. • Low testosterone levels, especially in men. Men with diabetes are much more likely to have low testosterone. • Infections: People with diabetes often have infections they don’t know about. Infections take energy to fight, which can cause fatigue and raise blood sugar levels. A common source is urinary tract or “bladder” infections. They often hurt, but sometimes have no symptoms, except for the fatigue. • Undiagnosed heart disease: If you get tired after tasks that you used to sail through, it could be time to for a heart check-up. • Medication side effects: Many drugs for diabetes, blood pressure, depression, pain, and other issues can cause fatigue. Read labels, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Then there are Continue reading >>

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Tweet In the medical world, extreme tiredness and exhaustion that doesn’t disappear with rest or sleep is known as fatigue and this can be a telling symptom of diabetes. Causes of fatigue There are many things that can cause you to fell fatigued. The most common and obvious is a lack of sleep. Most adults need between 6 and 8 hours of sleep a day, but this can vary quite a lot from person to person. It's also important to remember that most people require less sleep as they get older. Other common causes of fatigue include: Anaemia - a condition that occurs when you don't have enough red blood cells Cancer - most types of cancer cause fatigue to a certain degree Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - a condition that causes unexplained exhaustion and fatigue Depression - constant tiredness is a major indicator of depression or emotional stress Diabetes - sudden and extreme tiredness is one of the main symptoms of diabetes mellitus Infections - fatigue can be brought on by various infections such as the flu (influenza) Coeliac Disease - an autoimmune condition in which inflammation in the lining of the small intestine affects the body’s ability to absorb nutrients properly. Diabetes and fatigue With diabetes, fatigue is caused by a number of factors, including: High blood sugar levels, either from a lack of the insulin horomone or from insulin resistance, can affect the body’s ability to get glucose from the blood into cells to meet our energy needs People on stronger diabetes medication such as insulin, may also experience fatigue as a symptom of low blood glucose levels. Blood glucose testing can help to determine whether high or low sugar levels may be the cause of fatigue. Recognising fatigue Symptoms of fatigue include: A lack of, or no energy Difficulty in carrying out s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tiredness Symptom | Sign No 1 Of 6 Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Diabetes Tiredness Symptom | Sign No 1 Of 6 Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes – Tired, Fatigued And Worn-Out LINK TO SHARE THIS VIDEO: Early symptoms of diabetes like the diabetes tiredness symptom comes with being tired and having a lack of energy. This is one of the most common diabetes symptoms. Although the average person may feel tired from time to time after a busy week or physical exertion. Fatigue associated with diabetes tiredness is entirely a different matter. You may also feel unmotivated, have difficulty concentrating and feel worn-out even after a full 8 hour’s sleep the night before. The tired feeling of diabetes fatigue is usually due to an imbalance of blood sugar. Your cells rely on sugar for fuel and energy. The hormone insulin controls the cell’s ability to remove sugar (glucose) from the blood. When you have diabetes, your blood sugar isn’t entering the cells the way it is supposed to. Your cells rely on this sugar for the fuel that needs to be burned for energy. When your cells are starved for fuel, you won’t have the energy you need – and you chronically feel tired and totally worn-out. These are also early symptoms of diabetes. When the body no longer uses insulin properly in order for the blood sugar (glucose) to enter the cells, this is called insulin resistance. Fatigue is a common complaint that doctors hear on a routine basis. Fatigue and feeling tired can be caused by many ailments. What separates diabetes fatigue is that is frequently present along with other telltale symptoms such as: excessive thirst, frequent urination, slow healing of wounds, weight gain or loss and blurry vision. Keep in mind that you can have elevated blood sugar with no signs at all. In order to combat the tired feeling of diabetes fatigue, you have to get your blood sugar levels back to a normal range. Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

OBJECTIVE Fatigue is a classical symptom of hyperglycemia, but the relationship between chronic fatigue and diabetes has not been systematically studied. We investigated prevalence, impact, and potential determinants of chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Out of 324 randomly selected T1DM outpatients, 214 participated in this cross-sectional observational study. Participants were compared with age- and sex-matched population-based controls. Chronic fatigue, functional impairments, current health status, comorbidity, diabetes-related factors, and fatigue-related cognitions and behaviors were assessed with questionnaires, and HbA1c values and comorbidity were assessed with medical records. Sixty-six patients underwent continuous glucose monitoring combined with an electronic fatigue diary for 5 days. Acute fatigue and four glucose parameters were determined: mean, variability, and relative time spent in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. RESULTS T1DM patients were significantly more often chronically fatigued (40%; 95% CI 34–47%) compared with matched controls (7%; 95% CI 3–10%; P < 0.001). Chronically fatigued patients had significantly more functional impairments. Fatigue was the most troublesome symptom. Age, depression, pain, sleeping problems, low self-efficacy concerning fatigue, and physical inactivity were significantly associated with chronic fatigue. Chronically fatigued patients spent slightly less time in hypoglycemia (proportion 0.07 ± 0.06 vs. 0.12 ± 0.10; P = 0.025). Glucose parameters were not related to acute fatigue. CONCLUSIONS Chronic fatigue is highly prevalent and clinically relevant in T1DM. Its significant relationship with cognitive behavioral variables and weak association with blood gl Continue reading >>

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tweet Many people with diabetes will describe themselves as feeling tired, lethargic or fatigued at times. It could be a result of stress, hard work or a lack of a decent night’s sleep but it could also be related to having too high or too low blood glucose levels. Tiredness as a symptom of diabetes Regular tiredness, particularly tiredness following meals, is a common symptom of diabetes. Read more on the symptoms of diabetes What causes people with diabetes to be tired? Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having too high or too low blood sugar levels. In both cases, the tiredness is the result of having an imbalance between one’s level of blood glucose and the amount or effectiveness of circulating insulin. If you feel tired during the day, despite having slept well, it could be a result of either high or low sugar levels. It is best to test your blood glucose levels to see whether the tiredness is indeed a result of having high or low sugar levels. This is particularly important for people on insulin. Read about the recommended blood glucose levels ranges Tiredness and high blood sugar levels Blood glucose levels go high when there is either insufficient insulin (typically in the case of type 1 diabetes) or the insulin is not working effectively enough (typically in type 2 diabetes). To provide us with energy, insulin is needed to transport glucose from blood into our cells to be used for energy. When there is not enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t working effectively, it means the sugar in our blood cannot get into our cells and therefore our cells do not receive the energy they need. As a result, we feel tired. Managing tiredness and high blood sugar after meals If tiredness is accompanied by high blood glucose levels after meals, it can indica Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue Due To Emotional Toll Of The Disease | Prevention

Diabetes Fatigue Due To Emotional Toll Of The Disease | Prevention

If you have diabetes and youre tired all the time, dont just chalk the fatigue up to your fluctuating blood sugar. Turns out that the emotional toll of dealing with diabetes can be whats behind your fatigue, according to a new study published in The Diabetes Educator. And you dont have to just take it. Researchers from the University of Illinois College of Nursing measured the blood sugar levels of 83 diabetic women over the age of 40, and also asked them general questions about their health. Instead of shifting blood sugar levels being linked with fatigueas is often assumed by doctorsother factors, like depression and BMI, were shown to be greater indicators of whether women felt constantly tired. More from Prevention: The Problem With Being Tired All The Time "People have always assumed blood sugar is the cause of fatigue," says lead study author Cynthia Fritschi, RN, PhD. "It really isn't. Stress, depression, sleepall of these play a bigger factor in fatigue than blood sugar or blood glucose. Heres the problem: Being tired makes you less likely to do what you need to do to keep your diabetes in check, like exercising and eating healthy meals. And doctors dont typically pick up on these lifestyle issues. "People want to know why they're lacking that get-up-and-go, but doctors don't ask how are you feeling? how are you sleeping? how is your daytime activity? says Fritschi. Heres how to make sure your fatigue is being addressed: Be specific. When discussing symptoms with your doctor, state the outcome as well, says Fritschi: Because I'm tired, I'm not able to do x, y and z. "It helps your doctor see that your fatigue is not just a symptom; it's keeping you from taking care of yourself." Take your own health inventory. "Think of the things you can control," says Fritsch Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Patients With Diabetes: A Review

Fatigue In Patients With Diabetes: A Review

Go to: Abstract Objective Fatigue is a common and distressing complaint among people with diabetes, and likely to hinder the ability to perform daily diabetes self-management tasks. A review of the literature about diabetes-related fatigue was conducted with an eye toward creating a framework for beginning to conduct more focused studies on this subject. A literature search containing the terms diabetes, fatigue, tiredness, and symptoms was conducted to search for literature that addressed diabetes-related fatigue. Diabetes presents many potential pathways for fatigue, but focused studies on this symptom are rare. Furthermore, research on diabetes-related fatigue is limited by fatigue's non-specific symptoms and because fatigue researchers have yet to agree on standardized definition, measurement or diagnostic criteria. Additionally, few diabetes randomized clinical trials included measurement of patient-reported outcomes, such as symptoms or health-related quality of life in their study designs, though one that did provided some the meaningful finding that symptom-focused education improved self-management practices, HbA1c levels, quality of life and symptom distress. Conclusion There is a need to standardized definition, measurement and diagnostic criteria of fatigue in diabetes. We present a model that can guide focused studies on fatigue in diabetes. The model capitalizes on the multidimensional phenomena (physiological, psychological, and lifestyle) associated with fatigue in diabetes. Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus, a major public health problem, affects approximately 6% of the world's adult population, and is increasing in epidemic proportions.1, 2 Among people with diabetes, fatigue is a pervasive and distressing complaint. Although fatigue also occurs in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Fatigue is one of the most common and most disabling symptoms of diabetes. What causes all this exhaustion and how can we get our energy back? Some studies have reported that as many as 85% of people with diabetes experience fatigue, defined as excessive tiredness that interferes with one or more life functions. As a Diabetes Self-Management reader named Donnah wrote, “Since being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, my housework suffers dramatically, I don’t do half of the things that I used to do with my child. When I do find the time and energy to do things, I am easily worn out and need to rest. I can’t even keep a job. I am on disability because of it and I hate this.” Causes of fatigue How does diabetes make you tired? • High blood sugar makes blood sticky, so it can’t get through the capillaries as easily to bring oxygen to cells. You know how you get sleepy after a big meal? High blood sugar can mean having that feeling all the time. • Insulin resistance keeps glucose out of body cells, so they don’t have fuel. • High blood sugar also causes inflammation. Remember how exhausted you get with the flu? That is, in part, inflammation. The same thing happens with poorly controlled diabetes. • Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause fatigue. • The mental stress of coping with diabetes can wear out your mind and spirit. Many other conditions besides diabetes can cause fatigue. If your sugars are under control, but you still lack energy, consider being tested for: • Sleep apnea, which causes exhaustion and is very common in diabetes. If you wake up tired, ask your doctor for a sleep test. • Anemia, or a lack of red blood cells or hemoglobin (the protein responsible for transporting oxygen) in the blood. • Low or high thyroid. • Low sex hormo Continue reading >>

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

When you have diabetes, your daily to-do list can seem like a lot. You track your blood sugar, take medicine, watch your diet, and exercise. It can make you feel overwhelmed and burned out. If you’re there: 1. Know that no one is perfect. There are no vacations from diabetes. Even the most diligent people can’t keep their blood sugar or diet or physical activity on target all the time. “Diabetes is unique because [you’re] actually making medical decisions, day-to-day, minute-to-minute,” says Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, a clinical health psychologist. This can be stressful, says David Nathan, MD, director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. “If people are always stressed out about diabetes, they’re miserable,” Nathan says. He says people need to forgive themselves if they miss their goals for a day, a week, or even more. “Chill a little bit,” Nathan says. “We’re going to do the best we can. We need to recognize no one is perfect.” 2. Pay attention to what stresses you out. Living with diabetes can cause fear, anger, worry, and sadness. Lawrence Fisher, PhD, director of the Behavioral Diabetes Research Group at UCSF School of Medicine, has studied what doctors call “diabetes distress” in people with type 1 and those with type 2diabetes. He learned that during any 18-month period, from a third to a half of people with diabetes will feel a good bit of it. He cites seven common sources of diabetes distress among people with type 1 diabetes. The most common is a feeling of helplessness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety i Continue reading >>

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Diabetes and fatigue are often discussed as a cause and effect. In fact, if you have diabetes, you’re more than likely going to experience fatigue at some point. However, there may be much more to this seemingly simple correlation. About 2.5 million people in the United States have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). CFS is marked by ongoing fatigue that significantly disrupts everyday life. People with this type of extreme fatigue use up their energy sources without necessarily being active. Walking to your car, for example, can zap all your energy. It’s thought that CFS is related to inflammation that disrupts your muscle metabolites. Diabetes, which affects your blood sugar (glucose) and the production of insulin by the pancreas, can also have inflammatory markers. A wealth of studies have looked at the possible connections between diabetes and fatigue. It can be challenging to treat both diabetes and fatigue. However, there are numerous options that can help. You may first need to see your doctor to determine the exact cause of your fatigue. There are numerous studies connecting diabetes and fatigue. One such study looked at the results of a survey on sleep quality. Researchers reported that 31 percent of people with type 1 diabetes had poor sleep quality. The prevalence was slightly larger in adults who had type 2 diabetes, at 42 percent. According to another study from 2015, about 40 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have fatigue longer than six months. The authors also noted that the fatigue is often so severe that it impacts everyday tasks as well as quality of life. A 2013 study was conducted on 37 people with diabetes, as well as 33 without diabetes. This way, the researchers could look at differences in fatigue levels. The participants anonymously answer Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue – Regain Your Energy And Feel Great

Diabetes Fatigue – Regain Your Energy And Feel Great

Diabetes fatigue is a condition that can take a toll on your physical, mental and emotional well-being. Fortunately, there are simple steps you can take to fight fatigue and regain your energy. What exactly is fatigue? Fatigue is different from feeling tired. You may feel tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep. Fatigue, on the other hand, is a constant and excessive tiredness that is usually not relieved by rest. It affects your energy, motivation, and concentration. What Is Diabetes Fatigue? There is a strong relationship between diabetes and fatigue. In a study published in Diabetes Care, 40% of patients with Type I diabetes experienced chronic fatigue. Some studies show that up to 85% of people with diabetes suffer from fatigue. Fatigue is a distressing disorder that can make daily tasks difficult to carry out. Some signs and symptoms of fatigue: Chronic tiredness Dizziness Irritability Achy muscles Headaches Slowed reflexes Inability to concentrate Low motivation Causes of Diabetes Fatigue Causes of diabetes fatigue are many and are likely due to a combination of physiological, psychological and lifestyle factors. Let’s take a closer look at some of the common causes of diabetes-related fatigue. Physiological Factors Changes in blood: Having diabetes changes your blood. Those with diabetes have been shown to have a higher blood viscosity, or blood thickness, than the average healthy person. Thick blood makes it harder for cells to flow through the bloodstream, carrying energy and oxygen to parts of the body, including the brain. Inflammation: Inflammation, a common problem associated with diabetes, causes fatigue. Inflammation affects the nervous system, which sends messages to the brain that the body needs to take a rest and heal. If that com Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Fatigue?

Does Diabetes Cause Fatigue?

I am a 55-year-old man with type 2 diabetes who is on oral medication. I find that I am very tired in the afternoon. Is this a side effect of diabetes? If so, can anything be done about it? Continue reading >>

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