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Fasting Blood Sugar 193

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Level Readings? 2

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Level Readings? 2

in Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes by Andy What are normal fasting glucose levels? Sugar levels before bed? After a meal? When you ask what normal blood sugar levels should be, you need to take into account a number of factors. You should also consult your own doctor to find out what YOUR blood sugar levels should be, but here are some general guidelines. For a normal, healthy individual, fasting blood sugar levels should be between 70 100 mg/dl (in the fasted state i.e. first thing in the morning). After eating a meal, higher blood sugar levels can be expected, and this will be dependent on the type of food you ate, its glycemic index, etc. 2 hours after the meal, normal blood sugar levels should be less than than 140 mg/dl as insulin should be reducing the levels of sugar in the blood. At bed time, your sugar levels will probably be between 100 140 mg/dl. A diabetic is someone with a consistent fasting blood glucose above 110 mg/dl, and this can be between 140 235 mg/dl after a meal. Someone with a blood glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dl in considered hypoglycaemic . Anyone with blood sugar levels above about 120 mg/dl is hyperglycaemic . If your blood sugar level is regularly over 100, but below 130 mg/dl, you are considered pre-diabetic , and at risk of going on to develop full type 2 diabetes . If your levels are constantly over 130 mg/dl, you are considered diabetic. Diabetes is tested using an oral glucose tolerance test. Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Symptoms Of Diabetes

Questions And Answers - Symptoms Of Diabetes

Q:Can an alcohol body odor, profuse sweating, constant desire for sweets, and constant thirst be signs of diabetes? A:When there is excess sugar circulating in the bloodstream, not getting into the muscles because of insufficiency or malfunctioning of insulin, the body may begin to break down fat at a rapid rate to provide energy to "hungry" tissues. This can cause the odor you are referring to. The other symptoms you describe can also indicate high blood sugar. I suggest you see your physician ASAP. Q:How does diabetes affect your thinking process? Under medications such as insulin do diabetics still suffer from attitude swings? A:With or without diabetes, when blood sugars are not in balance, fatigue, dizziness, "fuzzy" thinking, mood swings and other symptoms may result. With insulin-requiring diabetes, it can be even more challenging to maintain stable blood sugars, but is very achievable with the right monitoring and support. Having a disease like diabetes does provide greater challenges for stable health and moods, but does not negate the ability to attain and maintain them. Q:Do I have diabetes with fasting sugar levels only a little on the high side? They have varied from 102 to 110 for the last 10 years. However my sugar level after eating food has always been within the limit, varying from 110 to 130 A:You are what we term "pre-diabetic" with fasting blood sugars between 100 -125. One or two sessions with a nutritionist should get you going in the right direction to help you achieve a goal of being around 90 for a fasting level. And of course, regular exercise and activity are most important. If you haven't done so, get a thorough physical, including an A1C (average measure of 3 months of blood sugars). This will give you some sense of the areas you need to f Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. If your blood sugar levels are consistently 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL, you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people with diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. Children have mild high blood sugar when their blood sugar levels are between 200 mg/dL and 240 mg/dL. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-Related High and Low Blood Sugar Levels When you have diabetes , you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycemia ) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range . If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes . Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell other Continue reading >>

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Does this test have other names? Glucose, postprandial; glucose, two-hour postprandial; two-hour PPG; two-hour postprandial blood sugar What is this test? This is a blood test to check for diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar in check. This means your blood sugar levels are too high, and over time this can lead to serious health problems including nerve and eye damage. This test is done to see how your body responds to sugar and starch after you eat a meal. As you digest the food in your stomach, blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels rise sharply. In response, your pancreas releases insulin to help move these sugars from the blood into the cells of muscles and other tissues to be used for fuel. Within two hours of eating, your insulin and blood glucose levels should return to normal. If your blood glucose levels remain high, you may have diabetes. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if your healthcare provider wants to see if you have diabetes or another insulin-related disorder, especially if you have symptoms such as: Frequent urination Unusual thirst Blurred vision Tiredness Repeated infections Sores that heal slowly If you're pregnant, you may have this test to screen for gestational diabetes, diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. Treating gestational diabetes reduces the risk for health problems for you and your baby. What other tests might I have with this test? Your healthcare provider may order other tests to confirm or evaluate whether you have diabetes. These may include: Fasting blood glucose test. This measures the amount of sugar in your blood. A1C (glycosylated hemoglobin) test. This measures your average blood sugar level over the last 2 to 3 months. Glucose tolerance test. This m Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Expected Blood Glucose After a High-Carb Meal Written by Sharon Perkins ; Updated June 22, 2017 Checking your blood glucose after meals helps determine how well you're controlling your blood sugar. 4 Should You Skip a Meal if Your Blood Glucose Is High? Blood glucose levels normally rise after a high-carbohydrate meal and drop back to normal levels within a few hours. But if your glucose levels rise higher than normal and recover more slowly, you might have diabetes. Your doctor can administer tests that measure your blood glucose levels immediately before you consume a high-carbohydrate meal and for several hours afterward. If you already have diabetes, your doctor might want you to check your blood glucose levels after meals, to make sure you're keeping your glucose within the expected range. Healthy, non-diabetic people normally have blood glucose levels of less than 120 milligrams per deciliter two hours after a normal meal, rarely exceeding 140 mg/dL, according to the American Diabetes Association. Levels return to normal within two to three hours. When you undergo a glucose tolerance test, you consume a high-carbohydrate drink or snack containing 75 grams of carbohydrate. At one hour, your test falls into the normal, non-diabetic range if your blood glucose remains below 200 mg/dL. Two hours after your meal, blood glucose should remain below 140 mg/dL. A level of over 200 mg/dL at two hours post-prandial -- which means after a meal -- indicates diabetes. Levels between 140 and 200 mg/dL indicate pre-diabetes, a condition with a strong risk of developing diabetes in the future. Diabetics experience larger spikes in blood glucose that take longer to return to baseline. For diabetics, blood glucose an hour after eating should remain below 180 mg/dL or no more than 8 Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Always Above 100 Mg/dl Causes

Fasting Blood Sugar Always Above 100 Mg/dl Causes

by Rony QUESTION: Hi Dr., Download PDF Ad To View PDF, Download Here ProPDFConverter Learn more My blood sugar has been always over 100 mg/dL. Fasting glucose level some times is 107, some times is 102 or 105. And I lost almost 20 ib in one year and I exercise half hour every day and eliminated all source of sugar from my diet. At the end, my blood sugar is still over 100. I have too much anxiety and think too much and i'm very eager. Do you think all what I mentioned above are the cause of my problem and any other advise? My age is 33 and weigh 140 ib and 5 feet tall. Thank you ANSWER: Hi Rony, First, I want to know if you are a diabetic or not. That is very important, especially to know if you are under any drug treatment or not. Next, what I see from your blood glucose levels, I think they seem very very normal unless you have other problems that I am not aware of. You are very young to get anxious about such normal blood sugar levels of yours. Please keep in mind that the new recommendations of ADA/EASD regarding the blood sugar levels emphasize the "individual approach". In other words, the fasting glucose levels of up to 107 mg/dL should be considered normal in normal people or pre-diabetics or diabetics. As far as there are not other hidden problems that should be investigated and can change the target level. If you have set the target of less than 100 mg/dL for your blood sugar level with your doctor, then, talk to him/her to make some changes. I would advise to take into account your age, your work, your personality, and dinner menu. So, such sugar levels are very normal for people of your age. Especially, when you wake up and the "morning" hormones gives the right energy you need for the following day. In addition, if you conduct a stressful life or have a str Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Your blood glucose levels can determine whether you have or are at risk for developing diabetes, a condition in which your body no longer effectively processes and absorbs glucose from the bloodstream. Blood glucose levels fluctuate during the day, particularly after meals. Postprandial -- which means after eating -- glucose levels that rise beyond a certain level may mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. However, two-hour postprandial blood sugar testing is not recommended to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Video of the Day Two to 3 hours after eating a meal, blood glucose levels typically fall to normal fasting levels. For people without diabetes, this is typically 125 mg/dL or less, according to criteria established by the American Diabetes Association. If your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is higher than 125 mg/dL, your doctor will likely order one of the ADA-recommended blood tests for diagnosing diabetes. The options include a hemoglobin A1c test and an oral glucose tolerance test. Before developing type 2 diabetes, many people go through a phase called "prediabetes." With this condition, postprandial blood sugar levels are typically abnormally high -- but not elevated enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes. Modest weight loss, increased physical activity and dietary changes can often prevent prediabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Know the basic steps for managing your diabetes. Poorly managed diabetes can lead to many health problems. Know how to: Monitor your blood sugar (glucose) Find, buy, and store diabetes supplies If you take insulin, you should also know how to: Give yourself insulin Adjust your insulin doses and the foods you eat to manage your blood sugar during exercise and on sick days You should also live a healthy lifestyle. Exercise at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Do muscle strengthening exercises 2 or more days a week. Avoid sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time. Try speed walking, swimming, or dancing. Pick an activity you enjoy. Always check with your doctor before starting any new exercise plans. Follow your meal plan. Take your medicines the way your health care provider recommends. Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes. Talk to your doctor and diabetes educator about how often you should check your blood sugar. Not everyone with diabetes needs to check their blood sugar every day. But some people may need to check it many times a day. If you have type 1 diabetes, check your blood sugar at least 4 times a day. Usually, you will test your blood sugar before meals and at bedtime. You may also check your blood sugar: After you eat out, especially if you have eaten foods you don't normally eat If you feel sick Before and after you exercise If you have a lot of stress If you eat too much If you are taking new medicines Keep a record for yourself and your provider. This will be a big help if you are having problems managing your diabetes. It will also tell you what works and what doesn't work, to keep your blood sugar under control. Write down: The time of day Your blood sugar level Th Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

My five-year-old daughter has been suffering a lot of really bad headaches recently, so bad that I took her to Emergency Room thinking something was really wrong. That is when everything changed! They sent her home saying it was a migraine. The next morning, when she woke, she was really sweaty and shaky so I called my mother-in-law, who is a nurse practitioner, and who said might be low sugar, to test her. I didn't think to much about it but gave her some juice then she was fine. Later that day, we ate dinner and I decided to test her post meal just to see and her sugar was 189 mg/dl [10.5 mmol/L]. After that, I started keeping track fasting, two hours post meal and before bed. Her fasting sugars were 70 to 114 mg/dl [3.9 to 6.3 mmol/L]; her post meal sugars have been anywhere from 133 to 193 mg/dl [7.4 to 10.7 mmol/L]; and bedtime sugars are always on the low end of 78 to 83 mg/dl [4.3 to 4.6 mmol/L]. I talked with the doctor and he decided to do an A1c and urine; both were normal. Her A1c was 5.4. I am not sure what is going. Two hours after breakfast, my daughter's sugar was 177 mg/dl [9.8 mmol/L] so I gave her some protein to take it back down and it went to 140 mg/dl 7.8 mmol/L] and off to school she went. I got a call three hours later saying she was flushed, dizzy and had a tummy ache so I went to get her and her sugar was 64 mg/dl [3.6 mmol/L]. She does drink a lot and always seems to be snacking on something or hungry and seems to go potty at least 8 to 12 times a day and at least once in night. Should I be worried it is diabetes? If so, what do I need to do since her blood work has all been normal? And, what type would she be? She is not overweight but type 2 does run on both sides. My husband and I do not have it but grandparents do. The numbers you describ Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 2 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 2 diabetes: Measuring sugar levels in blood and urine yourself Created: December 7, 2010; Last Update: January 11, 2018; Next update: 2021. Many people with diabetes measure their blood sugar levels themselves. For those who inject insulin several times a day, checking their sugar levels with a blood glucose meter is an important part of their daily treatment. The amount of insulin that is injected at mealtimes depends on various factors, including the measured blood sugar level. Sugar levels in blood or urine can be measured in various ways. You can also measure the level of sugar in tissues of the body. You can measure your blood sugar levels yourself using an electronic device called a blood glucose meter. To do this, you prick your fingertip with a small needle, and place a drop of blood on a test strip. The strip is inserted into the blood glucose meter. Shortly after, your blood sugar level is displayed on the device's screen. Measuring sugar in your blood involves the following steps: First of all, lay out everything you need. This includes a blood glucose meter, a blood-sampling device with a fine needle (lancet), and a test strip. Wash your hands before measuring your blood sugar because dirt and other residues can mix with the blood and distort the results. Take a test strip out of the package and insert it into the glucose meter. One small drop of blood is enough for the test. It should just fill the test field. If you prick the side of your finger rather than your fingertip, it is less noticeable. You can get the right amount by gently squeezing the tip of your finger. Then carefully place the drop of blood on the test strip without smearing it. After a short while your blood sugar level will be displayed on the meter. Modern devices can save the measu Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

Blood - Sugar Chart

Blood - Sugar Chart

Blood Sugar-Conversion Blood Sugar Chart Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator Glycemic Index Calculator HbA1c or A1c Calculator for Blood Glucose View all Adult Height Potential Height and Weight for Children Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Calculator Development Milestone Immunisation View All Check Your Prostate Gland Drugs and Sexual Problem Calculator Depression Calculator Preventive Health - Screening Tests & Charts Sexual Symptoms (Undesirable) and Drugs Calculator View All Multiple Pregnancy Calculator Ovulation Calculator / Ovulation Calendar / Ovulation Chart Pregnancy Due Date Calculator Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Virginity Calculator View All Frame Size Calculator Height and Weight for Children Height and Weight by Body Frame for Adults Ideal Baby Weight Ideal Body Weight - Adults View All Alzheimer's Risk Assessment Calculator Dementia Risk Calculator Weight Loss Calculator Adult ADHD Screening Calculator Age for Marriage License View All Heart Attack Risk Calculator Cholesterol Risk Calculator Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator Osteoporosis Risk Chart Stroke Risk Calculator View All Daily Calorie Requirements Daily Calorie Requirement for Age and Lifestyle Recommended Intake of Minerals Vitamins and Minerals in Food Items Daily Calorie Counter for Indian Food View All Activity Calorie Calculator Blood Pressure Calculator Blood Pressure Chart Breath Calculator Cardiac Risk or Risk of Heart Attack View All Continue reading >>

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