diabetestalk.net

Fasting Blood Sugar 193

Blood Glucose Levels High In Morning & Low After Eating

Blood Glucose Levels High In Morning & Low After Eating

You may be puzzled by a high blood glucose reading in the morning despite going to bed with a good reading the night before. Or your postmeal blood glucose may be lower than the reading before you ate. Unusual blood glucose fluctuation can be frustrating for diabetics and is affected by many factors. Keeping a good record of your diet, medication and blood glucose can often help you solve the mystery. Video of the Day If you consistently wake up with higher blood glucose levels despite being compliant with your meal plan, this could be a condition known as the dawn phenomenon, states the American Diabetes Association. Dawn phenomenon is a a sudden rise of blood glucose levels 10 to 20 milligrams per deciliter in the early morning between 2:00 and 8:00 a.m. It is caused by an increased release of hormones such as cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine while your body is preparing to wake up. These hormones increase insulin resistance and stimulate your liver to release glucose, causing blood glucose levels to rise. Insufficient insulin or medication, excessive carbohydrate snacks at bedtime or high-fat meals at dinner may also cause blood glucose to be elevated in the morning. To rule out if your high blood glucose is due to dawn phenomenon, your endocrinologist may ask you to eat a low-fat, carbohydrate-controlled dinner, maintain your usual physical activities and check your blood glucose around 2 or 3 a.m. for several days. Your doctor will help you determine if you have dawn phenomenon and adjust your medications accordingly. If the fluctuation is due to food, your dietitian may alter your meal plan and may suggest that you skip a bedtime snack or change the type of snack to a lean protein, modify your dinner or add some light exercise after dinner. When you wake up with Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

My five-year-old daughter has been suffering a lot of really bad headaches recently, so bad that I took her to Emergency Room thinking something was really wrong. That is when everything changed! They sent her home saying it was a migraine. The next morning, when she woke, she was really sweaty and shaky so I called my mother-in-law, who is a nurse practitioner, and who said might be low sugar, to test her. I didn't think to much about it but gave her some juice then she was fine. Later that day, we ate dinner and I decided to test her post meal just to see and her sugar was 189 mg/dl [10.5 mmol/L]. After that, I started keeping track fasting, two hours post meal and before bed. Her fasting sugars were 70 to 114 mg/dl [3.9 to 6.3 mmol/L]; her post meal sugars have been anywhere from 133 to 193 mg/dl [7.4 to 10.7 mmol/L]; and bedtime sugars are always on the low end of 78 to 83 mg/dl [4.3 to 4.6 mmol/L]. I talked with the doctor and he decided to do an A1c and urine; both were normal. Her A1c was 5.4. I am not sure what is going. Two hours after breakfast, my daughter's sugar was 177 mg/dl [9.8 mmol/L] so I gave her some protein to take it back down and it went to 140 mg/dl 7.8 mmol/L] and off to school she went. I got a call three hours later saying she was flushed, dizzy and had a tummy ache so I went to get her and her sugar was 64 mg/dl [3.6 mmol/L]. She does drink a lot and always seems to be snacking on something or hungry and seems to go potty at least 8 to 12 times a day and at least once in night. Should I be worried it is diabetes? If so, what do I need to do since her blood work has all been normal? And, what type would she be? She is not overweight but type 2 does run on both sides. My husband and I do not have it but grandparents do. The numbers you describ Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Always Above 100 Mg/dl Causes

Fasting Blood Sugar Always Above 100 Mg/dl Causes

by Rony QUESTION: Hi Dr., Download PDF Ad To View PDF, Download Here ProPDFConverter Learn more My blood sugar has been always over 100 mg/dL. Fasting glucose level some times is 107, some times is 102 or 105. And I lost almost 20 ib in one year and I exercise half hour every day and eliminated all source of sugar from my diet. At the end, my blood sugar is still over 100. I have too much anxiety and think too much and i'm very eager. Do you think all what I mentioned above are the cause of my problem and any other advise? My age is 33 and weigh 140 ib and 5 feet tall. Thank you ANSWER: Hi Rony, First, I want to know if you are a diabetic or not. That is very important, especially to know if you are under any drug treatment or not. Next, what I see from your blood glucose levels, I think they seem very very normal unless you have other problems that I am not aware of. You are very young to get anxious about such normal blood sugar levels of yours. Please keep in mind that the new recommendations of ADA/EASD regarding the blood sugar levels emphasize the "individual approach". In other words, the fasting glucose levels of up to 107 mg/dL should be considered normal in normal people or pre-diabetics or diabetics. As far as there are not other hidden problems that should be investigated and can change the target level. If you have set the target of less than 100 mg/dL for your blood sugar level with your doctor, then, talk to him/her to make some changes. I would advise to take into account your age, your work, your personality, and dinner menu. So, such sugar levels are very normal for people of your age. Especially, when you wake up and the "morning" hormones gives the right energy you need for the following day. In addition, if you conduct a stressful life or have a str Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 193 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 193 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 193 Help?

Blood Sugar 193 Help?

Ok should I be trippin out or not? My son has type 1 diabetis so I know about all there is too know SO I THOUGHT. well lately if I miss a meal or just late... a note to barbiq if she wears a pump shes type 1 hun, big difference. Thankx tho Just calm down and think about it, If your son is a type 1 then you should know a little about diabetes and stop flipping out. Call your doctor and get an apt. to be seen. It is possible for you to aslo be a type 1. (a non diabetic should never read over 140) I was age 29 and 118 pounds when I found out I had type 1. You could just be starting thats why you're 190-ish and not 800-ish as most when they find out they are type 1. On another note some type 2's do use pumps. If you're spiking up to the 180s-190s and staying in that range for 1-2 hours, then I don't think it matters whether you call it diabetic or... show more If you're spiking up to the 180s-190s and staying in that range for 1-2 hours, then I don't think it matters whether you call it diabetic or pre-diabetic. Your blood sugar is too high and even in a dangerous range. Many blood sugar studies indicate that chronic blood sugar over 140 mg/dL damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs. Imagine if you're spiking like that for 2-3 meals a day. That could be 4-6 hours per day that you're above 140 mg/dL. Over the long term, that's extremely problematic. Regardless of whether you're technically pre-diabetic or diabetic, your first-phase insulin response is weakened or gone and your second-phase is a little impaired, but fairly functional. That tells me that, even if you are diabetic, you haven't deteriorated as severely as many diabetics are when they're finally diagnosed. You're more likely to preserve what function you have left by keeping the blood sugar after meals under 1 Continue reading >>

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Level Readings? 2

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Level Readings? 2

in Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes by Andy What are normal fasting glucose levels? Sugar levels before bed? After a meal? When you ask what normal blood sugar levels should be, you need to take into account a number of factors. You should also consult your own doctor to find out what YOUR blood sugar levels should be, but here are some general guidelines. For a normal, healthy individual, fasting blood sugar levels should be between 70 100 mg/dl (in the fasted state i.e. first thing in the morning). After eating a meal, higher blood sugar levels can be expected, and this will be dependent on the type of food you ate, its glycemic index, etc. 2 hours after the meal, normal blood sugar levels should be less than than 140 mg/dl as insulin should be reducing the levels of sugar in the blood. At bed time, your sugar levels will probably be between 100 140 mg/dl. A diabetic is someone with a consistent fasting blood glucose above 110 mg/dl, and this can be between 140 235 mg/dl after a meal. Someone with a blood glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dl in considered hypoglycaemic . Anyone with blood sugar levels above about 120 mg/dl is hyperglycaemic . If your blood sugar level is regularly over 100, but below 130 mg/dl, you are considered pre-diabetic , and at risk of going on to develop full type 2 diabetes . If your levels are constantly over 130 mg/dl, you are considered diabetic. Diabetes is tested using an oral glucose tolerance test. Continue reading >>

Sugar Highs And Lows: Rapid Recognition

Sugar Highs And Lows: Rapid Recognition

Diabetes is common. An estimated 8.2 percent of adults in the U.S. (range 4.4 to 17.9 percent) have diabetes1. Some 14 percent of total U.S. health care expenditures pay for treatment of people with diabetes, half of which pay for complications associated with vascular changes that lead to MIs (myocardial infarctions), strokes, kidney disease, retinal (eye) damage and foot ulcers. The progression of these complications can be slowed with aggressive management of blood sugar levels and blood pressure as well as good eye care2. Alterations in blood glucose levels, both high and low, are often encountered by EMS providers. Depending on where you work, hypo- or hyperglycemia will account for 3 to 4 percent of your total EMS responses. Hypoglycemia refers to low blood glucose levels, which often exhibits signs and symptoms. The most common cause of hypoglycemia results from diabetes medications although hypoglycemia can occur in people without diabetes from a variety of other causes. Most commonly, hypoglycemia occurs in patients taking insulin. While textbooks often outline very specific hypoglycemia signs and symptoms, they are, in reality, very non-specific. Many patients will have tremors, palpitations, sweating, and/or hunger. These actually have a behavioral effect of encouraging the patient to eat. Blood pressure and heart rate will usually increase, but not significantly. There may be observable behavioral changes, loss of awareness and, at very low glucose levels, seizures or unconsciousness3. While signs and symptoms vary tremendously between patients, they remain consistent in any single patient from episode to episode. Many times, patients are unaware of their symptoms even though they may be obvious to others around them. Because patients often have amnesia, the Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 193 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 193 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 93mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctors instructions. It is conducted in t Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Symptoms Of Diabetes

Questions And Answers - Symptoms Of Diabetes

Use the chart below to help understand how different test results can indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes Fasting Blood Glucose Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Random Blood Sugar (taken any time of day with or without fasting) A1C Ideal Result Less than 100mg/dl Less than 140 mg/dl Less than 140 (even after eating a large meal) Less than 5.7% Pre-diabetes 100-125mg/dl 140-199mg/dl 140-200 5.7% to 6.4% Diabetes 126mg/dl and greater 200 mg/dl and greater 200 or greater 6.5% or more Q: Can an alcohol body odor, profuse sweating, constant desire for sweets, and constant thirst be signs of diabetes? A: When there is excess sugar circulating in the bloodstream, not getting into the muscles because of insufficiency or malfunctioning of insulin, the body may begin to break down fat at a rapid rate to provide energy to "hungry" tissues. This can cause the odor you are referring to. The other symptoms you describe can also indicate high blood sugar. I suggest you see your physician ASAP. Q: How does diabetes affect your thinking process? Under medications such as insulin do diabetics still suffer from attitude swings? A: With or without diabetes, when blood sugars are not in balance, fatigue, dizziness, "fuzzy" thinking, mood swings and other symptoms may result. With insulin-requiring diabetes, it can be even more challenging to maintain stable blood sugars, but is very achievable with the right monitoring and support. Having a disease like diabetes does provide greater challenges for stable health and moods, but does not negate the ability to attain and maintain them. Q: Do I have diabetes with fasting sugar levels only a little on the high side? They have varied from 102 to 110 for the last 10 years. However my sugar level after eating food has always been within the limit, v Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Your blood glucose levels can determine whether you have or are at risk for developing diabetes, a condition in which your body no longer effectively processes and absorbs glucose from the bloodstream. Blood glucose levels fluctuate during the day, particularly after meals. Postprandial -- which means after eating -- glucose levels that rise beyond a certain level may mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. However, two-hour postprandial blood sugar testing is not recommended to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Video of the Day Two to 3 hours after eating a meal, blood glucose levels typically fall to normal fasting levels. For people without diabetes, this is typically 125 mg/dL or less, according to criteria established by the American Diabetes Association. If your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is higher than 125 mg/dL, your doctor will likely order one of the ADA-recommended blood tests for diagnosing diabetes. The options include a hemoglobin A1c test and an oral glucose tolerance test. Before developing type 2 diabetes, many people go through a phase called "prediabetes." With this condition, postprandial blood sugar levels are typically abnormally high -- but not elevated enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes. Modest weight loss, increased physical activity and dietary changes can often prevent prediabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for visiting my website! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D. * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinol Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

One of the topics that comes up a lot in the email I get from visitors to my What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes web site is the question of when is the best time to test your blood sugar. A lot of doctors still tell people with Type 2 to test first thing in the morning and before meals. That was what I was told at diagnosis in 1998. People who test using this schedule may tell you their blood sugar is usually 120 mg/dl, which sounds pretty good, except that since this is a fasting number it usually hides the information that the person's blood sugar maybe going to 250 mg/dl or higher after every meal. Research has shown that for people with Type 2 diabetes--especially those who have been diagnosed recently and still retain some beta cell function--it is the high spikes after meals that contribute most heavily to raising the A1c and causing complications. If you only test your fasting blood sugar, you will not know anything about how high your blood sugar is spiking after meals, so you won't know which foods are toxic to you because they cause dangerous spikes. If you are like most people with Type 2 your access to the very expensive blood sugar testing strips is limited. You may have to pay for strips yourself or your insurance may pay for a single box each month. That means that you need to use each strip as efficiently as possible. Here are some strategies that you can use to get the information out of your blood tests that will let you drop your A1c back into the healthy zone. Keep a written log that matches what you eat with the test result you get. Even though your meter may keep a list of your readings, these readings are meaningless unless you know what food you ate that resulted in each particular reading. If you write down what portion size of which food y Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

Glucose: The Silent Killer

Glucose: The Silent Killer

The deadly effects of even slightly elevated glucose are fatally misunderstood. One reason for this calamity is physicians who continue to rely on obsolete blood glucose ranges. These doctors fail to recognize that any excess glucose creates lethal metabolic pathologies that are underlying factors behind multiple age-related diseases. People today thus suffer and die from diabetic-like complications without knowing their blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high! Life Extension® long ago argued that most aging people have elevated blood glucose. Our controversial position has been vindicated as mainstream medicine consistently lowers the upper-level threshold of acceptable (safe) fasting blood glucose. As new evidence accumulates, it has become abundantly clear that maturing individuals need to take aggressive actions to ensure their fasting and after-meal glucose levels are kept in safe ranges. Glucose Is Like Gasoline Our body’s primary source of energy is glucose. All of our cells use it, and when there is not enough glucose available, our body shuts down in a similar way that a car engine stops when the gasoline tank is empty. When glucose is properly utilized, our cells produce energy efficiently. As cellular sensitivity to insulin diminishes, excess glucose accumulates in our bloodstream. Like spilled gasoline, excess blood glucose creates a highly combustible environment from which oxidative and inflammatory fires chronically erupt. Excess glucose not used for energy production converts to triglycerides that are either stored as unwanted body fat or accumulate in the blood where they contribute to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque.1-6 If you were filling your automobile with gasoline and the tank reached full, you would not keep pumping in more gas. Yet Continue reading >>

More in diabetes