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Fasting Blood Sugar 155

Blood Sugar 155 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 155 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 55mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctors instructions. It is conducted in t Continue reading >>

Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Does Not Rule Out Diabetes

Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Does Not Rule Out Diabetes

Many doctors are missing a chance to save the lives of their patients by not ordering a blood sugar level one hour after eating a meal. Having a normal fasting blood sugar (<100 mg/dl) does not rule out diabetes. A high rise in blood sugar after meals can damage every cell in your body and markedly increase risk for heart attacks, strokes, dementia, impotence, osteoporosis, blindness, deafness and so forth. The new rule is that if your blood sugar one hour after a meal is greater than 155 mg/dl, you should immediately make lifestyle changes (Diabetes Care, Oct 2017). You are at increased risk for being diabetic if you also have: • a fasting blood sugar above 95 mg/dl, • a large protruding belly • small hips/buttocks • high systolic blood pressure (>120 at bedtime) • high LDL cholesterol (>100 mg/dl) • high triglycerides (>150 mg/dl) • low HDL cholesterol (<40 mg/dl) • any heart, liver or kidney problems • blood hydroxy vitamin D levels below 20 ng/ml • a family history of diabetes or heart attacks • sedentary habits with little or no exercise My Recommendations If your blood sugar one hour after eating is above 155 mg/dl • Lose excess weight. Try intermittent fasting • Follow a high plant diet that includes lots of vegetables, whole grains, beans, seeds and nuts and at least some fruit with meals every day. Restrict red meat, processed meats, fried foods, sugar-added foods and all drinks with sugar in them, including fruit juices. • If you are not already exercising, check with your doctor and start a supervised exercise program • Keep blood levels of hydroxy vitamin D above 20 ng/ml Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Almost two million women of reproductive age have diabetes, and these numbers continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is extremely important for women with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels before they become pregnant, because if women have poorly controlled diabetes going into a pregnancy, they are at much higher risk for serious fetal complications. This improved control can be accomplished with education and medical management. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are also at higher risk for: Large birth weight babies, resulting in more Cesarean deliveries and increased complications during delivery Premature births or fetal death Pre-eclampsia: a dangerous surge in blood pressure associated with protein in the urine Diabetic retinopathy: damage to the retina caused by high glucose levels Diabetic kidney disease Severe hypoglycemia: episodes of low blood glucose levels that can result in confusion or unconsciousness Ensuring a healthy pregnancy The good news is that women with uncomplicated diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a normal range before and during pregnancy have about the same chance of having a successful pregnancy as women without diabetes. The Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Pregnancy Program recommends the following blood glucose goals and medical assessments before pregnancy: Fasting and pre-meal blood glucose: 80-110 mg/dl Blood glucose one hour after meal: 100-155 mg/dl A1C, a blood test that measures average blood glucose over two to three months: less than 7 percent and as close to 6% as possible without hypoglycemia Review of diabetes and obstetrical history Eye evaluations to screen for and discuss risks of diabetic retinopathy Renal, thyroid, gynecological and sometimes c Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

Your Guide To Diabetes Testing

Your Guide To Diabetes Testing

If you have diabetes, your body is not able to produce or use insulin to turn your blood sugar (blood glucose) into energy. Your doctor can test your blood glucose levels to determine if you have diabetes. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will need periodic diabetes testing to help manage and monitor your condition. Diabetes Testing for Diagnosis There are several tests that can determine if you have diabetes or pre-diabetes: Fasting plasma glucose test. This diabetes test is the easiest and least expensive diagnostic diabetes test available. After an eight-hour fast, your blood will be drawn and the level of glucose in it measured. If your glucose level is 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or below, your result is considered normal. Levels of 100 to 125 mg/dL indicate prediabetes, and levels of 126 or above that are confirmed by a second test signal diabetes. Random plasma glucose test. This is another type of diabetes test that measures the glucose in your blood, but you do not have to be fasting. Random plasma glucose test results that indicate your blood glucose level is 200 mg/dL or higher mean you could have diabetes, and your doctor probably will want to conduct further testing. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) . For this diagnostic diabetes test, you will undergo a fasting plasma glucose test and then drink a sugary solution. Two hours later, you will have another plasma glucose test to see how your body responded to the drink. OGTT results of 139 mg/dL and below are considered normal, 140-199 mg/dL indicate prediabetes, and 200 mg/dL and higher that are confirmed by a repeat test indicate diabetes is present. Glucose challenge test. Similar to the OGTT, the glucose challenge test is given to pregnant women to screen for gestational diabetes. If your Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

New Research On High Glucose Levels

New Research On High Glucose Levels

American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines advise “lowering A1C to below or around 7%” and postprandial (after-meal) glucose levels to 180 mg/dl or below. But new research shows that these glucose levels damage blood vessels, nerves, organs, and beta cells. An article by diabetes blogger Jenny Ruhl analyzes at what blood glucose level organ damage starts. According to Ruhl, research shows that glucose can do harm at much lower levels than doctors had thought. This news could be discouraging or even terrifying. If it’s hard to meet your current glucose goals, how will you reach tighter goals? Such news might make some people give up. But remember, a high postprandial or fasting reading won’t kill you. All we know is that higher numbers correlate with higher chances of complications. You have time to react. In fact, we could choose to look at this as good news. We all know of people who developed complications despite “good control.” But complications are not inevitable; it’s just that so-called “good control” wasn’t really all that good. First, the numbers. “Post-meal blood sugars of 140 mg/dl [milligrams per deciliter] and higher, and fasting blood sugars over 100 mg/dl [can] cause permanent organ damage and cause diabetes to progress,” Ruhl writes. For nerve damage, University of Utah researchers studied people with painful sensory neuropathy, or nerve damage. They found that participants who did not have diabetes but who had impaired glucose tolerance on an oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT, (meaning that their glucose levels rose to between 140 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl in response to drinking a glucose-rich drink) were much more likely to have a diabetic form of neuropathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The higher these OGTT num Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

I am puzzled by my blood sugar pattern. I am not on any medications. My morning fasting blood sugar is always the highest of the day—between 120 and 140 mg/dl. The rest of the day it is in the normal range. Why does this occur? Continue reading >>

Tag Archives: Normal Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Tag Archives: Normal Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Ever heard of gestational diabetes? It’s when a when a woman develops diabetes during pregnancy. It usually goes away soon after the baby is born. All pregnancies are characterized by some degree of insulin resistance and high insulin levels: they are necessary for the baby. Nevertheless, healthy pregnant women run blood sugars 20% lower than when they are not pregnant. In the U.S., gestational diabetes occurs in 5% of pregnancies, affecting more than 240,000 births annually. Compared to caucasians, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs more often in blacks, native Americans, Asians, and Latinos. So What’s the Big Deal? Numerous problems are associated with GDM, for both the mother and the baby: dangerously high blood pressure (preeclampsia) excessive amount of amniotic fluid (the baby in the uterus floats in this fluid) delivery requiring an operation early or premature delivery death of the baby birth trauma, such as broken bones or nerve injury metabolic problems in the baby (low blood sugar, for example) abnormally large baby (macrosomia, a major problem) Diabetic ketoacidosis—a life-threatening complication of diabetes—is rare in GDM. How Is GDM Diagnosed? (section updated December 28, 2013) Most women should undergo a screening test around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Screen earlier if undiagnosed type 2 diabetes is suspected or if risk factors for diabetes are present. The American Diabetes Association (2014 guidelines) recommends either one of two screening tests. “One-step test.” It’s a morning oral glucose tolerance test after at least eight hours of fasting. Fasting blood sugar is tested then he woman drinks 75 grams oral of glucose. Blood sugar is tested again one and two hours later. This blood sample is obtained by a needle in a v Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

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