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Fasting And Type 1 Diabetes

5 Day Water Fast Results Of A Type 1 Diabetic Female: Why, How, And What Happened

5 Day Water Fast Results Of A Type 1 Diabetic Female: Why, How, And What Happened

Why A 5 Day Water Fast? There are many reasons why one would fast. Let me explain to you the journey I took in the last month that brought me to this fasting experiment. I'm a diabetic. It's been over 20 years now since I was diagnosed in 1996 at the age of 13. I see the doctor every 6 months, give or take, and have my HbA1c taken. Mine is usually in the 7-8 range. While this is high, it's not something I've worried about a whole lot. Over the years, I've done low carb, paleo, gluten free, almost no carb, but have only once in this time gotten an HbA1c result below 7. The last doctor's appointment in February had my HbA1c at 8.6. The doctor was not happy, and I decided I was going to show him. The doctor suggested I see a nutritionist, but I really didn't see the point. I know what to do, I just got lazy and was enjoying that chocolate, popcorn, ice cream, corn chips a few too many times every week. I knew what to do, I just wasn't doing it. Now was the time to fix my diet. Judo is my sport and I want to compete in an event at the end of April. Since I compete in the 70 kg weight class, but my weight has been hovering around 76 kg, I needed to get my butt in gear if I was going to drop 6 kg in a couple of months. In order to motivate myself, I started researching on the web again. Visiting my favorite hunting grounds of paleo and keto diets, I came across the Bulletproof Diet, which I had heard about before, but never really looked at it. It seemed like a new approach to the same problem, so I wanted to read his take on it. This lead me down eating a ton of butter, trying to intermittent fast, and overall eating less and having much better blood sugars. I would still go out to eat and eat those corn chips, or eat way too much protein in a meal causing my blood sugar to Continue reading >>

Usc Publishes Results Of A Fasting Mimicking Diet That May Reverse Diabetes

Usc Publishes Results Of A Fasting Mimicking Diet That May Reverse Diabetes

USC Publishes Results of a Fasting Mimicking Diet That May Reverse Diabetes In mice and human cells, periodic cycles of fasting-like conditions appear to reprogram pancreas cells and restore insulin production. Los Angeles, Calif., February 23, 2017 A landmark study published today in Cell finds that providing mice with a temporary, specifically formulated Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD) promotes the growth of new insulin-producing pancreatic cells and reduces symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The study also examined pancreatic cell cultures from human type 1 diabetes patients, finding similar results. In type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses insulin-producing beta cells, increasing instability in blood sugar levels. The study showed a remarkable reversal of diabetes in mice placed on the FMD for four days each week. They regained healthy insulin production, reduced insulin resistance, and demonstrated more stable levels of blood glucoseeven in the later stages of the disease. The research revealed that genes normally active in the developing pancreases of embryonic/fetal mice are reactivated in diabetic adult mice when cycling Fasting Mimicking Diets with normal diets. This increases production of the protein neurogenin-3 (Ngn3) and, as a result, promotes the creation of new, healthy insulin-producing beta (b) cells. The researchers simulated type 1 diabetes in mice by administering high doses of the drug streptozotocin (STZ) killing the insulin-producing b-cellsand studied mice with type 2 diabetes, characterized by insulin resistance and eventual loss of insulin production, which have a mutation in the gene Lepr. Both types of diabetes were reversed by FMD cycles. Researchers also examined pancreatic cell cultures from human donors and found t Continue reading >>

Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Carly Crompton Note: This is part of our library of resources on Food. Learn more about dietary recommendations from nutritionists and foodies alike on our Food page! In the Type 1 community, food and eating habits are not only a common subject of conversation, but a necessary component of management. A common dietary practice that is important to acknowledge in this space is Fasting. Religious Reasons There are many different reasons for fasting and sometimes it cannot be avoided. Religious and spiritual fasting manifests in many different practices and belief systems such as Judaism, Buddhism and Islam. Fasting before medical procedures like surgery or blood tests is often required. Additionally, fasting for detoxification, or “doing a cleanse” is a growing dietary practice. So, is it safe for those with Type 1 diabetes to fast? If so, what are the best practices to follow while participating in a fast? Most of the research regarding fasting and diabetes surrounds Ramadan and most often, the medical recommendation for those with diabetes is to avoid fasting. The main health risk is hypoglycemia – particularly if you continue taking insulin while fasting without regular blood glucose monitoring. If you do choose to fast for spiritual or personal reasons, talk with your healthcare provider about a plan and regularly monitor glucose to avoid health emergencies. Safety first is the best practice, and this is recognized in most spiritual communities. I was raised Jewish and distinctly remember the announcements from our Rabbi during long Yom Kippur services pleading individuals in various circumstances to not fast for their own safety and instead display their faith through another outlet. Again, fasting may not be out of the question, just be sure to tal Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re into health and fitness you will have heard of Intermittent fasting at some point. Intermittent fasting is a dieting strategy used by athletes, celebrities, and high performance entrepreneurs to improve health, body composition, and improve mental clarity. Like any diet. Intermittent fasting works as long as you can sustain it. The concept behind Intermittent fasting is simple. It involves, Periodic bouts of fasting (i.e. going without food and calorie dense drinks) Which leads to reduced meal frequency and a smaller time frame to eat. This gives the dieter an opportunity to eat larger, more filling and satisfying meals in the specific limited time window. Since you can only eat so much at one meal, less calories are consumed. This helps prevent fat gain and speeds fat loss (provided your calories are set at the right point) – Read here on how to set a calorie baseline. Fasting windows can range from 4-12 hours or more – it all depends on which strategy suits you best (I cover all the different IF strategies inside the members site) The fasting periods increases counter regulatory hormones that liberate fuel for body stores for energy and also suppress appetite (win-win for fat loss) …But, what about people with diabetes? Q. Does it work for us? Q. Is it dangerous? Q. How do you manage insulin and blood glucose levels when you fast for hours? I discuss all of these questions and more in a personal video blog I recorded in Barcelona City earlier this year. Enjoy. PS. For those of that are control freaks about saturated fat and carbs in the diets of people with diabetes. Please do your homework and consider my context is different to yours. Continue reading >>

Fasting Safely With Diabetes

Fasting Safely With Diabetes

Fasting can be a challenge for anyone, but it can be especially difficult for someone with diabetes. As any diabetic knows, successful blood sugar management relies on healthy meals eaten at regularly spaced intervals. So what happens when one or more meals need to be skipped for religious reasons or because of a medical or dental procedure? Each individual's situation is different, so consultation with your physician is crucial. That said, there are some general guidelines that can help when it comes to fasting with diabetes. Diabetes and Fasting: Does Type Matter? Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, fasting needs to be approached with care. "Fasting should be rare if you have diabetes because an individual with type 1 or type 2 on oral medication can experience hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)," says Amy Kranick, a certified diabetes educator with Diabetes Care Club in Nashville, Tenn. Risks from low blood sugar include seizure, coma, or even death if left untreated. On the other hand, depending on the individual, fasting without using insulin can result in high blood sugars or in diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious diabetes complication caused by blood build-up of acids called ketones). Dehydration is another fear if fluids are avoided during the fast. Diabetes and Fasting: Does the Reason Make a Difference? That being said, people with diabetes may want or need to fast for a variety of reasons, and the length of the fast can affect what actions you need to take. Here are some examples: Religious reasons. Some people with diabetes may want to fast for religious observances such as Yom Kippur or Ramadan. Given the risky nature of fasting with diabetes, this isn't necessarily a good idea. "Both [Judaism and Islam] have guidelines that exempt those people who will be Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting with Type 1 Diabetes If your first reaction to intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes isOh my gosh, my blood sugar would be so low! I could never do that! then definitely keep reading. In this guide, I will cover everything you need to know about intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes: Whats the point of intermittent fasting? There are 3 general reasons a person might want to pursue intermittent fasting. Weight-loss: This is the most obvious and most common reason to give it a try. Simplicity: Reducing the number of hours each day that you have to think about food, track food, make decisions around food, and cook food can be really freeing! Instead of frantically and unexpectedly skipping meals because of a hectic schedule, intermittent fasting allows you to properly and methodically skip eating during parts of the time. Energy: Once you get going, and youre no longer freaking out about, How hungry will I feel!?!this approach to eating can actually give you quite a boost of energy because your body will be burning fat for fuel instead of relying on sugar from your blood. Body fat is an endless source of energy. Before we get started: if your blood sugar drops just because you dont eat for a handful of hours, youre taking too much background/basal insulin via pump or injection. Talk to your CDE or primary care doctor about basal testing. (Or check out Gary Scheiners book, Think Like a Pancreas and do the basal testing yourself!) Basal testing literally consists of purposefully skipping a meal (or two) in order to see if your insulin keeps your blood sugar steady, or if your blood sugar significantly rises or falls out of your personal goal range. If it rises, youre not getting enough background/basal insulin. If it falls, then youre clearly ge Continue reading >>

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

When the now 46-year-old Mary Roberts from Lockhart, Texas, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, her doctor immediately put her on Metformin (glucophage), a drug to help stabilize blood sugar. “When I got the diagnosis, I guess I wasn’t surprised,” says Roberts, explaining that not only was she overweight but her mom had been on insulin for type 2 diabetes. Not wanting to be on medication herself for her entire life, Roberts set out on a path to control the diabetes through diet, but a few years of nutrition classes proved unsuccessful in lowering her blood sugar level. It was after her doctor suggested insulin on top of the high dose of Metformin that Roberts switched gears. “I really wanted to find a way to get healthy,” she says. She found the solution in changing her approach to eating — just not the way she expected. Intermittent fasting (IF) combined with the popular ketogenic diet, which emphasizes dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake, helped her lose weight and lower her A1C. “I feel amazing,” Roberts says. What Is Intermittent Fasting and How Is It Done? Although IF has become more popular in recent years, the diet plan isn’t new. In fact, many religions (including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) have followers who practice fasting of some variety throughout the year. Fasting is often required for blood tests, medical procedures, or surgery. The reason IF has gained so much attention recently is likely due to the release of new diet books plugging the plans and celebrity endorsements. “I think that it has gained popularity because anytime a person drastically cuts calories from their diet, they’re going to lose weight. And we’re so results driven that by seeing that happen we think, This is a great solution,” says Despina Continue reading >>

Fasting Recommendations For Patients With Insulin-dependent Diabetes

Fasting Recommendations For Patients With Insulin-dependent Diabetes

Can patients with insulin-dependent diabetes safely fast for medical or religious reasons? Response from Andrea G. Scott, PharmD, MPH Pharmacist, StoneSprings Hospital Center, Dulles, Virginia Fasting is a challenge for all patients but can be particularly difficult for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. Patients may have to fast for laboratory tests, surgery, diagnostic procedures (eg, colonoscopy), or religious reasons. The duration of the fast is also important because it can affect how much insulin a patient will need during that time. Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes need to understand the management of diabetes during fasting to prevent hypoglycemia (blood glucose < 70 mg/mL or 3.9 mmol/L). Not eating for an extended period of time leads to decreased blood glucose in all patients. In patients without diabetes, insulin levels decrease as glucagon increases, and the act of glycogenolysis provides about 75% of glucose requirements.[ 1 ] This mechanism allows blood glucose levels to remain within a normal range. In patients with insulin-dependent diabetes, the glucagon response is lost, and epinephrine becomes the main method to increase gluconeogenesis in the liver. However, the epinephrine response also diminishes over time; thus, patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are at risk for hypoglycemia.[ 2 ] Symptoms of hypoglycemia include sweating, shaking, mood changes, hunger, headache, tachycardia, and, in severe cases, unconsciousness, seizures, and coma.[ 2 ] Healthcare professionals should discuss the symptoms of hypoglycemia with patients who are planning to fast. The duration of the fast and the type of insulin used can help guide insulin treatment during the fasting period. Some minor adjustments to insulin may be required if patients are fas Continue reading >>

My Experience With Intermittent Fasting And Type 2 Diabetes

My Experience With Intermittent Fasting And Type 2 Diabetes

My Experience With Intermittent Fasting and Type 2 Diabetes My Experience With Intermittent Fasting and Type 2 Diabetes Almost a year ago, I was lying in a bed in the intensive care unit of my local hospital. The day before, Id gone to the E.R. because my left shin was hurting and an angry red splotch had developed. It was roughly the size of my palm. The doctor gave me antibiotics and a topical ointment but didnt take blood, and sent me home. Overnight, the infection bloomed. My white blood cell count was frighteningly high, and if I hadnt returned to the hospital when I did, you wouldnt be reading this. All this from a scratch on my leg that my dog licked. I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 2004 during an annual physical. The doctor prescribed Metformin and told me to have a gastric bypass, which I did not do. I eventually developed neuropathy in my feet and lower legs, so when the scratch on my shin became inflamed, I didnt really notice the discomfort, and wasnt even aware that my leg was infected . I was lucky to get treatment when I did. The infection came close to causing amputation. And, Im even luckier that it didnt kill me. I was athletic and healthy through most of my life. At 35, I was 62, 203 pounds and doing two-hour aerobic workouts. Three years later, a career change had me traveling up to 300 days a year and eating every meal on the companys dime. I ballooned up to 300 pounds. Being away from friends and family, emotional eating, and free food all took a toll on my body. But the job kept me very active and I was still able to do strenuous work that my thinner friends couldnt do because of their inactivity. I thought I was heavy, but healthy. In my 20s and 30s, I tried a variety of healthy diets, from vegetarian (four years), to lower calories and Continue reading >>

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Whether you are honoring an ancient religious practice or heading to the lab for a fasting blood test, care is needed when missing meals with diabetes. Fasting can throw off the delicate balance of food, water, and blood glucose levels in potentially harmful ways. Fasting with diabetes poses significant risks, says Kathaleen Briggs Early, PhD, RD, CDE, of the Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences. Most of the research on fasting and diabetes surrounds Ramadan, the annual Islamic observance that requires fasting from sunrise to sundown for 29 or 30 days. A commentary published in 2010 in Diabetes Care developed in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) focused on fasting during Ramadan, though many of the issues it raises are relevant to other types of fasting as well. It says that “most often, the medical recommendation will be not to undertake fasting” if you have diabetes. The paper acknowledges that fasting for spiritual reasons is a personal decision, but one that should include the guidance of a health care provider. A study found that 43 percent of people with type 1 diabetes and 79 percent of people with type 2 diabetes from 13 Islamic countries fast during Ramadan. With that reality, fasting safely becomes a priority for people with diabetes and their care providers. “Anybody with diabetes needs to first talk to their doctor about going on a fast,” says Early, and some experts recommend a pre-fasting medical assessment to help ensure safety. If you are considering fasting, talk to your health care provider about a plan that takes medication, nutrition, and hydration into account. Regularly monitoring blood glucose during fasting is key to avoiding health emergencies. Not eating when taking insulin or certain other diabetes Continue reading >>

Can Fasting Help Diabetes?

Can Fasting Help Diabetes?

With diabetes, eating makes blood sugar go up, which is generally bad. So could you try not eating at all? Research shows that you can for a while. It’s called fasting. How do you do it, how can it help, and what can go wrong? Since bodies store extra fuel in the form of glycogen (a type of carbohydrate) and fat, most people can safely take breaks from eating. Some evidence shows these breaks can help bodies heal. You know how some people advise a “Paleo” diet? That means eating like our Stone Age ancestors. Those hunter-gatherers didn’t eat three times a day, because they didn’t have food unless they found it or killed it. Perhaps our bodies evolved to do better if we skip some meals. Here are some fasts that have been studied recently. Intermittent fasting Several recent books advocate taking days off from eating. A common schedule is 5:2, meaning five days of normal eating and two days of severe calorie restriction, like 500 calories a day for women and 600 calories a day for men. Books such as The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer have popularized this approach. Some people like 5:2 because on your non-fasting days, you can eat normally “with little thought to calorie control.” People should not exercise vigorously or do a lot of endurance training on their fast days. Those who have Type 1 diabetes or who are taking diabetes medicines other than metformin are advised not to try intermittent fasting. Just 500–600 calories a day is not many, and it’s important to make them healthy calories. Dietitian Amy Campbell reported here that “A sample 500-calorie menu from The Fast Diet is steel-cut oatmeal with ½ cup blueberries for breakfast, and then chicken stir-fry made with 5 ounces of chicken and some vegetables, along with a tangerine Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Prolonged Fasting.

Type 1 Diabetes And Prolonged Fasting.

Abstract AIMS: Fasting is common in several religions. The aims of this study were to determine if prolonged fasting (> 25 h) is safe for individuals with Type 1 diabetes and to identify factors associated with success. METHODS: Patients intending to fast were instructed on insulin dose adjustments, frequent glucose monitoring and when to terminate the fast using a standard protocol. Clinical and epidemiological factors were recorded and a comparison was made between successful and unsuccessful fasters. RESULTS: Of 56 subjects who intended to fast, 37 (65%) were successful. Individuals terminated their fast in the presence of either hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia and adherence to the protocol was high. There were no serious side-effects of fasting. Successful fasters had greater reductions in insulin dosage and higher HbA(1c). There were no differences between individuals taking intermittent insulin injections and those with continuous infusion pumps. CONCLUSIONS: Persons with Type 1 diabetes can participate safely in prolonged fasts provided they reduce their usual insulin dose significantly and adhere to guidelines regarding glucose monitoring and indications for terminating fasting. Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1diabetes

Intermittent Fasting with Type 1Diabetes Intermittent Fasting. What is it and is it safe to do with type 1 diabetes? I was recently asked to post about intermittent fasting, so here goes nothing. **Please see excerpt at the bottom of this post if you have any doubts!One thing I want to clarify right off the bat, Ive never been a big breakfast eater, so Ive theoretically been intermittently fasting for quite a few years! Intermittent fasting is simply taking an extended period of time off from eating. Most of us do this each night for at least 8-12 hours. Important note: its still important to drink liquids like water, black coffee, or tea. The easiest way that Ive incorporated intermittent fasting into my lifestyle is by following the 16/8 rule. Basically, that boils down to 16 hours of fasting, and an 8 hour time frame to eat. For me, this is simple as I dont eat breakfast, I never really have. So I generally eat my first meal of the day at 12:30 (noon), my last meal at 18:00 (6pm), followed by fasting until lunchtime the next day. Although Dr. Bernstein does not support intermittent fasting, I still do it. It is not an extra choice that I make, I simply just do not eat breakfast (although I do on the weekends). What are the benefits of intermittent fasting? Stable blood sugar. For me, the benefits of fasting from my supper time meal until noon the next day are clear. My blood sugar is stable from 18:00 on day 1 until 12:30 on day 2, all without much effort. That means I eat between 12:30 and 18:00. That ranges from 16-18 hours of stable blood sugars. However, basal rates need to be checked to make sure that intermittent fasting is a safe option. Actually, running a basal test is also, in effect, fasting! Some other benefits that intermittent fasting is thought to pro Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Periodic fasting has long been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on autoimmune disorders, cancer prevention and treatments, cardiovascular disease, and a myriad of other ailments. This most recent paper by Cheng et al. might add the treatment of Type 1 diabetes to that list[1]. If successful in humans, it has the potential to reverse some or most of the loss of insulin-producing cells within the pancreas. Just as remarkable, the treatment itself is relatively straightforward, consisting of a regimented protocol of periodic fasting-like conditions. Generally speaking, Type 1 diabetes results from an autoimmune mediated depletion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta islet cells. In contrast, Type 2 results from lower cellular sensitivity to insulin. Type 2 is primarily caused by environmental factors such as poor diet. The current medical approach to treating Type 1 diabetes is the periodic administration of insulin, usually through self-administered injections. Most new therapies focused on curing Type 1 diabetes are looking to repopulating beta islet cells through the use of reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, these approaches are not as simple as the method demonstrated by Cheng et al in this recent study. The treatment consists of a “fasting mimicking diet” (FMD), which for mice corresponds to 3-4 day cycles of a high-fat and low-calorie diet, maintained for at least a month, followed by refeeding. This was performed on transgenic diabetic mice and also normal mice that had their beta cells depleted through the administration of high doses of a toxic drug. Results were also repeated using human diabetic primary beta cells in culture. In this case, the treatment consisted of the addition of human serum from individuals undergoing FMD. Continue reading >>

After Intermittent Fasting, These 3 Men No Longer Take Insulin For Diabetes -- But Experts Stress Caution

After Intermittent Fasting, These 3 Men No Longer Take Insulin For Diabetes -- But Experts Stress Caution

In the study, patients followed 24-hour fasts several times a week. They ate only dinner on fasting days but could drink water, coffee and broth throughout. They were all men, ages 40, 52 and 67, who had been diagnosed with diabetes 20, 25 and 10 years prior, respectively. The participants had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to obesity and develops over years due to a combination of genetics and lifestyle. In this type, the body becomes less responsive to insulin, a hormone it needs to balance glucose in the bloodstream. This is different from Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition in which the pancreas doesn't produce much, if any, insulin. Fasting for those with Type 1 diabetes "may be unsafe due to the increased risk for hypoglycemia," said Diwan, who was not involved in the new study. However, he has researched fasting and diabetes in mice , looking for important clues at the cellular level about how this might work. When it comes to this field of research, he said, "these are early days but very exciting." The new report is not a definitive study, he added; it has a small sample size, no control group and limited followup. Existing research in humans is also difficult to compare because it is largely observational, and how to implement fasting hasn't been standardized, Diwan said. Does fasting on alternate days work? A new study weighs in "It is very clear that people who can lose weight have better blood sugar control ... [and] sometimes can get off insulin if not too advanced in their disease," said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center, a nonprofit research and care center in Boston affiliated with Harvard Medical School. "The most established example of that are people that have bariatric surgery," Continue reading >>

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