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Eye Test For Diabetes

What To Expect At Your Eye Exam

What To Expect At Your Eye Exam

If you are lucky enough to have good eyesight, you may be surprised when your diabetes care team recommends that you make an appointment with an eye doctor. If your vision is stable, and your eyes don’t bother you, why should you have your eyes checked? The answer is that many potentially devastating eye problems develop without causing discomfort or distorting vision. Glaucoma and cataract are examples of eye problems that occur commonly in older adults and more frequently in people with diabetes. Generally, these conditions are treatable, but if not caught early enough, they can lead to vision loss or even blindness. In addition, there’s diabetic retinopathy, a serious complication that is more likely to occur in people with Type 1 diabetes but may develop in anyone with diabetes. Tight blood glucose control can significantly reduce the incidence and severity of diabetic retinopathy, but the only way to identify this and other eye problems in their earliest and most treatable stages is to have regular, comprehensive eye examinations. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> There’s no reason to avoid an eye exam; it involves a series of painless tests that check your visual acuity and general eye health and screen for signs of disease. Before we discuss what to expect at the exam, let’s take a look at the eye and how it works. The eye The eye is a hollow organ about the size of a Ping-Pong ball, with an opening at the front that lets in light, and a gelatinous substance called vitreous filling most of the inside. It functions in a manner similar to a camera. The aperture through which light enters the eye is the pupil, the black-seeming hole in the middle Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Diabetic retinopathy is best diagnosed with a dilated eye exam. For this exam, drops placed in your eyes widen (dilate) your pupils to allow your doctor to better view inside your eyes. The drops may cause your close vision to blur until they wear off, several hours later. During the exam, your eye doctor will look for: Abnormal blood vessels Swelling, blood or fatty deposits in the retina Growth of new blood vessels and scar tissue Bleeding in the clear, jelly-like substance that fills the center of the eye (vitreous) Retinal detachment Abnormalities in your optic nerve In addition, your eye doctor may: Test your vision Measure your eye pressure to test for glaucoma Look for evidence of cataracts Fluorescein angiography With your eyes dilated, your doctor takes pictures of the inside of your eyes. Then your doctor will inject a special dye into your arm and take more pictures as the dye circulates through your eyes. Your doctor can use the images to pinpoint blood vessels that are closed, broken down or leaking fluid. Optical coherence tomography Your eye doctor may request an optical coherence tomography (OCT) exam. This imaging test provides cross-sectional images of the retina that show the thickness of the retina, which will help determine whether fluid has leaked into retinal tissue. Later, OCT exams can be used to monitor how treatment is working. Treatment Treatment, which depends largely on the type of diabetic retinopathy you have and how severe it is, is geared to slowing or stopping progression of the condition. Early diabetic retinopathy If you have mild or moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, you may not need treatment right away. However, your eye doctor will closely monitor your eyes to determine when you might need treatment. Work with Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Exam With Retinavue

Diabetic Eye Exam With Retinavue

There's Still So Much to See There's a 95% chance of saving vision when diabetic retinopathy is discovered early. Protect your vision, and see a brighter tomorrow today. RetinaVue is a digital camera that is specifically made to take pictures of the retina, an important part of the eye for vision. This digital camera provides medical professionals with a zoomed in image of the patient's eye. This image then provides the information a retinal specialist needs to provide a diagnosis. From the RetinaVue diabetic eye exam, a retinal specialist can quickly determine if a diabetic... Has healthy vision, with no follow up care needed until a second check up RetinaVue exam 1 year later Needs a follow up appointment with a specialist, or Requires treatment as soon as possible Diabetes is the #1 cause of nontraumatic blindness in adults. Because of this, it's very important for anyone who has diabetes to take action to prevent vision loss. With a diabetic eye exam powered by RetinaVue, early detection of vision problems related to diabetes is possible. This early detection is essential to preventing vision loss before it happens. The RetinaVue diabetic eye exam is as easy as it is important. Just 5 Minutes of Your Time The RetinaVue diabetic eye exam is fast, easy and straightforward, taking about 5 minutes to start and finish the test. No Eye Dilation Necessary The RetinaVue diabetic eye exam does not require a patient's eyes to be dilated for the test. This makes the test convenient, as there's no need to wait to drive home or deal with the hassle of arranging a ride after your appointment. Most Insurance Policies Cover It This makes the RetinaVue diabetic eye exam affordable, on top of the potential savings from preventing vision problems before they need to be treated. You Ca Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

What is diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is a very common eye disease associated with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is considered a leading cause of blindness in American adults. The sad thing about diabetic retinopathy leading the blindness charge is that in a majority of cases, blindness could have been completely preventable If you are diabetic you will need to work closely with the Carter Eye Center diabetic retina eye doctors to monitor and treat this disease. The use of medications and daily blood sugar monitoring can make a major impact on containing the worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Retinopathy Symptoms - Treating Dallas Diabetic Retinopathy If you are a diabetic patient it is suggested by the RRC that you have regular eye exams to look for symptoms. Diabetic retinopathy does not really have any initial warning signs. Retinal swelling may cause blurred vision and distortion. Objects may look smaller or larger than normal. Floaters may appear due to the bleeding of the blood vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease caused by complications of diabetes. After 10 or 15 years most diabetic people have signs of mild damage to the back of the eye that we call retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of vision loss but that vision loss can be minimized by early diagnosis and carefully designed treatments. Diabetes causes damage to the blood vessels that nourish the retina, the seeing part at the back of the eye. Damage to the retina caused when blood vessels: Expand and begin to leak Develop brush-like branches Break and cause bleeding Once the leaking blood damages or scars the retina, the image sent to the brain becomes blurry. Successful Treatment Dr. Carter can do several things to repair the ongoing damage, such as: Focus Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Screening And Tests

Diabetic Retinopathy Screening And Tests

Tweet A once yearly retinal screening appointment (eye check) is carried out to identify early signs of diabetic retinopathy. If allowed to develop, diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. For this reason it is important to attend your retinal screening once a year. Do I qualify for diabetic retinopathy screening? Everyone with diabetes who is 12 years of age or over should receive a retinal examination once a year as part of the NHS’s retinal screening programme. If you are concerned that you may be developing retinopathy, check for retinopathy symptoms and see your GP. Ask your GP or healthy centre if you have not received an invitation to have a retinopathy screening appointment. Who carries out the retinal screening? You may have the screening either at a hospital or you may be invited to book your appointment with an optician in your area. The screening is free regardless of where it takes place. What happens at the retinopathy screening? The optician will take a photo of your retina. To do this they will need to clearly see into as much of the back of your eye as possible. To enable them, to do this they will give you eye drops which will expand your pupils. It may take up to 20 minutes for the pupils to get large enough. The eye drops can sting a bit so just be ready. Try to keep your eyes open as best you can to avoid having to having to have additional attempts. The fluid needs to cover the centre of your eye to make your pupils larger. When your pupils are sufficiently expanded the optician will sit you down in front of a machine which will take the photograph of the retina in each of your eyes. Your eyes must be fully open for a good photograph to be achieved. Be aware that it may take a few attempts to get the photograph just right. As well as taking a Continue reading >>

Annual Eye Exam

Annual Eye Exam

~ Deborah K. Schlossman, M.D. Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable new onset blindness in working-age adults. Anyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can have diabetic eye disease and not know it, as it is painless and often has no symptoms until very advanced stages. But with appropriate care you can reduce the risk of blindness and increase your chances of preserving sight. Joslin Diabetes Center has been on the cutting edge of diabetes-related eye disease prevention since its inception and has set standards across the world for the treatment and care of eyes. At Joslin we have developed clinical guidelines that recommend you take a three-pronged approach to preserving your vision: 1.Maintain excellent A1C and blood glucose levels. 2.Keep your blood pressure and other health factors, such as your cholesterol, in check. 3.Make sure you get your eyes checked annually through a dilated eye exam (an exam in which the doctor places drops in your eyes) or specially validated photographs of your retinas (the inside of the eyes). Eye exams for people with diabetes are very thorough and may take up to 2½ hours. Part of the exam includes applying drops to dilate your pupils, so the doctor can have a good look at what is happening at the back of your eye called the retina. No portions of the exam are painful, but when you have your pupils dilated you should be prepared to wear sunglasses after the appointment as you’ll be sensitive to light. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease for people with diabetes. It occurs when the small blood vessels in the eye are damaged by high levels of glucose in the blood. Although there are a variety of treatments to treat diabetic retinopathy, the earlier it is diagnosed the more effective the treatment. Although diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes, your eyes are at risk of damage from diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to sight loss if it's not treated. Eye screening is a key part of your diabetes care. Did you know? Selected Specsavers stores provide a range of eyecare services on behalf of the NHS to help maintain the health of the eyes. Because these services are delivered on behalf of the NHS, there is no cost to you. Ask your local store for details. What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy? In its early stages, diabetic retinopathy does not usually cause any noticeable symptoms, so you may not even know you have it. But screening can detect the condition before you notice any changes to your vision. If it is detected early enough, management of the condition can stop it getting worse. Otherwise, by the time symptoms become noticeable, it can be much more difficult to treat. Diabetic screening You should receive a letter from your local Diabetic Eye Screening Service inviting you to attend a screening appointment. The letter will include a leaflet about diabetic eye screening. The check takes about 30 minutes and involves examining the eyes and taking photographs of the retina to assess its health. Bring all the glasses and contact lenses you wear, along with lens solution for contacts. Contact your local screening service or your GP if you have not received a letter and your appointment is overdue. We’re partnering with Diabetes UK to help raise awareness and avoid preventable sight loss. Diabetic retinopathy does not usually cause any noticeable symptoms but advanced diabetic retinopathy can lead to loss of vision. If detected and treated early, most people will retain useful sight for life. Photographs from your check will be assessed by a number of specialists, including som Continue reading >>

Regular Eye Exams Can Detect Diabetes

Regular Eye Exams Can Detect Diabetes

Many people in Ireland may have type 2 diabetes without being aware of it, however regular eye exams could help detect the condition, opticians have said. Currently, over 190,000 people in Ireland have some sort of diabetes, with many more thought to be undiagnosed. One of the most serious complications of the condition is diabetic retinopathy, a disease of the eyes that can lead to blindness if left untreated. "People with diabetes are 10 to 20 times more likely to go blind than someone without the condition, due to diabetic retinopathy. However, if this condition is detected early through an eye examination and treated, blindness can be prevented in 90% of cases," explained Noel Meehan, chairperson of optician group, Specsavers Ireland. Opticians are trained to look out for signs of diabetes during regular eye examinations. According to Kieran O'Leary, CEO of the Diabetes Federation of Ireland, it is ‘vital' that people with diabetes are diagnosed as early as possible ‘to help reduce their risk of developing complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and blindness'. "A simple eye test can help with diagnosis," he said. Mr O'Leary added that if people are found to have signs of diabetes during an eye exam, they should immediately visit their GP for a simple blood test to diagnose the condition. Symptoms of diabetes include urinating more often than usual, especially at night, increased thirst, extreme tiredness, unexplained weight loss, slow healing of cuts and wounds and blurred vision. Adults are recommended to have their eyes tested every two years and eye tests are free of charge for people with medical cards or those entitled to PRSI treatment benefit. World Diabetes Day is being held today. For more information on eye health, see Irishhealth. Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Eye Exams

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Eye Exams

Overview Diabetes is a disease that profoundly affects many areas of your body, including your eyes. It increases your risk for eye conditions, such as glaucoma and cataracts. The primary concern for eye health in people with diabetes is the development of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that develops when the blood vessels in your retina become damaged. The retina is the light-sensitive portion of the back of your eye. As the damage worsens, you may begin losing your vision. Your eyesight may become blurry, less intense, and begin to disappear. This condition can affect people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The longer you live with diabetes, the more likely you are to develop complications like diabetic retinopathy. This is why adopting lifestyle changes and learning to manage diabetes is so important. In its earliest stages, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms. The initial symptoms may be barely noticeable or mild. Over time, the condition can worsen and lead to partial and then complete blindness. You should see your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms: floaters, or dots and dark strings, in your field of vision dark or empty areas in your field of vision blurry vision difficulty focusing vision changes that seem to fluctuate altered color vision partial or total vision loss Diabetic retinopathy most often affects both eyes at the same time and in equal measure. If you’re experiencing issues with only one eye, it doesn’t mean you don’t have diabetic retinopathy. However, it might indicate another eye issue. Make an appointment to see your doctor to find an appropriate treatment plan. The buildup of excess sugar in your blood can lead to a number of health issues. In your eyes, too much glucose can damage the tiny ves Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Exam

Diabetic Eye Exam

Did you know that if you have diabetes, either type 1 or type 2, you may need a more comprehensive eye exam or more frequent eye exams than patients who do not have this disease? Did you know that early detection and treatment of diabetic eye disease will reduce your chance of losing your vision due to diabetes? There are several eye conditions for which patients with diabetes need surveillance examinations. Diabetic retinopathy is, of course, the biggest concern, but diabetics also have higher risk for cataracts, double vision, and glaucoma as well. Diabetic Eye Exams Colorado Springs ​It is crucial that you do not wait for symptoms of poor vision if you have diabetes. Often there are no symptoms at all with the early stages of diabetic eye disease, when it is easier to control. It is important to get a comprehensive diabetic eye exam on a regular basis if you are a patient living with diabetes. Our Colorado Springs eye doctors specialize in treatment of eye disease and medical eye conditions and see hundreds of patients for diabetic eye exams each year. Diabetic Eye Disease: Retinopathy When your body is unable to properly store sugar due to diabetes, the blood vessels in your eyes are often damaged from the effects of circulating sugar on their cells, and the blood flow is compromised. Sometimes people with advanced stages of diabetes will have new blood vessels grow over the retina along with fibrosis or scar tissue. This scar tissue can pull your retina away from your eye wall, causing a retinal detachment – a serious condition that can lead to blindness if left untreated. Glaucoma can develop in patients with diabetes. One reason for this can be new blood vessels growing on the iris due to damage of the existing circulation. These abnormal vessels, called neov Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes, it is vital that you have your eyes checked regularly. Damage to the retina at the back of the eye (retinopathy) is a common complication of diabetes. If left untreated, it can become worse and cause some loss of vision, or total loss of vision (severe sight impairment) in severe cases. Good control of blood sugar (glucose) and blood pressure slows down the progression of retinopathy. Treatment with a laser, before the retinopathy becomes severe, can often prevent loss of vision. What is diabetic retinopathy? The term retinopathy covers various disorders of the retina, which can affect vision. Retinopathy is usually due to damage to the tiny blood vessels in the retina. Retinopathy is commonly caused by diabetes but is sometimes caused by other diseases such as very high blood pressure (hypertension). Note: people with diabetes also have a higher risk of developing other eye problems, including cataracts and glaucoma. How does diabetic retinopathy occur? Over several years, a high blood sugar (glucose) level can weaken and damage the tiny blood vessels in the retina. This can result in various problems which include: Small blow-out swellings of blood vessels (microaneurysms). Small leaks of fluid from damaged blood vessels (exudates). Small bleeds from damaged blood vessels (haemorrhages). Blood vessels may just become blocked. This can cut off the blood and oxygen supply to small sections of the retina. New abnormal blood vessels may grow from damaged blood vessels. This is called proliferative retinopathy. These new vessels are delicate and can bleed easily. The leaks of fluid, bleeds and blocked blood vessels may damage the cells of the retina. In some severe cases, damaged blood vessels bleed into the jelly-like centre of the eye (the vitreous Continue reading >>

Diabetes Discovery – Via The Eyes

Diabetes Discovery – Via The Eyes

Did you know that an eye exam can be the first clue to detecting diabetes and other hidden health concerns? Finding health issues early can give patients a better chance at preventing damage through early treatment and management. A routine eye exam can show so many things. Some can be downright life changing – and life-saving – for that matter. One doctor found out first-hand when she did the same thing she does every day – she looked into a patient's eyes. But this was no ordinary exam. When Kathleen Clary, OD, peered into her 48-year-old patient’s eyes, she saw blood and other fluids seeping out of fragile and miniscule vessels in her retinas. The retina is the light and sight-sensing back part of the eye – and without it, you don't see. “As soon as I noticed the leaking fluids and the hemorrhaging, I suspected that they might be symptoms of diabetes,” recalls Dr. Clary, who practices in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Ashburn, Virginia. “In my 12 years of experience as an eye doctor, that kind of bleeding usually signals that a buildup of sugar in the patient’s bloodstream has begun to break down the capillaries that feed the retina. The result is often what we call diabetic retinopathy – a condition in which continuing damage to retinal tissue from diabetes can lead to impaired vision or even blindness, if left untreated.” The eye exam was the very first clue the patient had that she might have diabetes. Dr. Clary talked with her patient about what she saw and explained what it could mean. “I want you to have your blood sugar level checked right away by your family doctor,” she told her patient. “Tell the doctor you need to be evaluated for diabetes with a fasting blood sugar test, because your optometrist noticed some retinal bleeding.� Continue reading >>

Diabetes' Effect On Vision

Diabetes' Effect On Vision

Diabetes' Effect on Vision | America's Best Contacts & Eyeglasses Patients with diabetes need to pay special attention to their vision, as diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in otherwise healthy patients. It can affect vision in other ways than total blindness as well, which can lead to dangerous situations where a patient is unaware that their vision is lessened until it's too late. Diabetic patients should endeavor to have their eyes checked at least annually for eye conditions that diabetes can both cause and cause to advance. Here are some of the common diseases your ophthalmologist or optometrist should look for during your annual visit. Cataracts is the clouding or fogging of the lens of the eye, which is normally clear. This clouding can vary in degree of severity, and it usually affects both eyes in time. Generally, cataracts can be found in older patients, but younger ones can also present with this issue. People with diabetes are more likely to get cataracts at an earlier age than other people, and their cataracts often worsen more quickly than those in non-diabetic individuals. If a diabetic should notice their vision growing cloudy, they should visit a board licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist as soon as possible for a diagnosis and treatment options to avoid genuine complications from cataracts. Diabetic retinopathy is caused by damage to the small blood vessels of the eye. High blood sugar and blood pressure can both cause your eye's small blood vessels to rupture and scar over the course of the disease. This damage sometimes can be asymptomatic (called 'background retinopathy'), but it can also significantly reduce vision. Both symptomatic and non symptomatic versions of retinopathy should be carefully monitored for by your eye doctor, especi Continue reading >>

An Eye Test For Diabetes

An Eye Test For Diabetes

A snapshot of the retina could detect cell damage in the early stages of diabetes. Diabetes messes with the body’s metabolism, which can result in devastating complications like nerve damage, kidney disease, and vision loss. By capturing a snapshot of the eye, scientists in Michigan say that they can pick up telltale signs of metabolic stress in the retina caused by diabetes. They say that the new imaging technology may offer a quick, noninvasive way of detecting the disease early and monitoring its progress. “With just a minute in an optometrist’s office, you might be able to detect metabolic stress in the eye, refer the patient to an endocrinologist, and get a diagnosis,” says Howard Petty, a biophysicist and imaging expert at the University of Michigan’s Kellogg Eye Center and one of the authors of a study that appears in the latest issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology. The study focused on patients with diabetes, but Petty says that the screening technology should be able to identify people with prediabetes–a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal and that often progresses to full-blown diabetes. The researchers are beginning clinical trials this fall, using the system on diabetics and prediabetics. “It’s an intriguing idea that you could detect early diabetes by looking for the changes that result from blood sugar, in the eye,” says John Buse, president of Medicine and Science at the American Diabetes Association, who was not involved in the work. Petty, together with Victor Elner and other colleagues at the University of Michigan, used a sophisticated camera system coupled with customized imaging software to detect fluorescence given off by oxidized proteins in dying cells in the retina. The 21 diabetics in their study h Continue reading >>

Eye Damage (diabetic Retinopathy)

Eye Damage (diabetic Retinopathy)

Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness in Canada. People with diabetes are more likely to develop cataracts at a younger age and are twice as likely to develop glaucoma, but diabetes’ effect on the retina is the main threat to vision. Called diabetic retinopathy, this effect of diabetes on the eyes is the most common cause of blindness in people under age 65 and the most common cause of new blindness in North America. It is estimated that approximately 2 million individuals in Canada (i.e. almost all people with diagnosed diabetes) have some form of diabetic retinopathy. We are pleased to announce that Diabetes Canada and the Canadian Association of Optometrists have partnered to help optometrists educate their patients about retinopathy. What is retinopathy? Over time, diabetes can cause changes in the retina at the back of the eye. Your retina helps you see by acting like a film projector in the back of your eye, projecting the image to your brain. The change is called retinopathy and there are a couple of different types that affect people with diabetes. The macula, which is the part of your retina that helps you to see colour, becomes swollen (macular edema) and this can cause blindness. A second complication is the growth of new weak blood vessels that break and leak blood into your eye so the retina cannot project images to your brain (proliferative diabetic retinopathy). The result is a loss of sight. Diabetes causes changes in the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina. In the early stages, known as nonproliferative or background retinopathy, the arteries in the retina weaken and begin to leak, forming small, dot-like hemorrhages (blood flow from the ruptured blood vessel). These leaking vessels often lead to swelling (edema) in the retina and decreased Continue reading >>

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