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Exercises To Prevent Diabetes

Preventing Diabetes

Preventing Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise among Americans of all ages: 26 million people have some form of the disease; 78 million have pre-diabetes. The good news is that preventive measures can delay the onset of diabetes, and controlling weight and cholesterol, blood pressure and blood glucose levels can help prevent complications once diabetes is present. Proper diet and exercise seem to be the prescription for many common health problems: high blood pressure and cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, and obesity. In fact, health experts recommend proper diet and exercise to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, a condition that also is affecting more and more adolescents who are exchanging outdoor activities for computer games, and carrots and yogurt for chips, cookies, and soda. The National Institutes of Health conducted a breakthrough study to show that diet and exercise can delay diabetes. The clinical trial proved that a half hour of walking or other low-intensity exercise daily, combined with a low-fat diet, reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. Diet and exercise Weight loss resulting from healthy eating and increased physical activity enables muscle cells to use insulin and glucose more efficiently, thus lowering diabetes risk. Lack of exercise can cause muscle cells to lose their sensitivity to insulin, which controls levels of sugar in the blood. "Even if you don't lose weight, exercise will make you stronger and healthier," says endocrinologist Douglas Zlock, MD, medical director of the diabetes center at John Muir Health. "Healthy habits can definitely postpone the onset of diabetes even if they don't prevent it." The certified diabetes educators at John Muir Health are firm believers that those at risk for diabetes can develop a flexible care program w Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes -- Prevention

Understanding Diabetes -- Prevention

Because of the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes, you can do a great deal to reduce your chance of developing the disease by slimming down if you are overweight. This is especially true if diabetes runs in your family. In fact, studies have shown that exercise and a healthy diet can prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes -- a condition that often develops prior to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The medications metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), and acarbose (Precose) have also been shown to be effective in delaying or preventing type 2 diabetes in those at risk. In someone who already has diabetes, exercise and a nutritionally balanced diet can greatly limit the effects of both types 1 and 2 diabetes on your body. In diabetics, stopping smoking is one of the best ways to help prevent the damaging effects of diabetes. If you smoke, quit; smoking dramatically increases the risk of heart disease, particularly for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Exercise In The Treatment And Prevention Of Diabetes

Exercise In The Treatment And Prevention Of Diabetes

Exercise in the Treatment and Prevention of Diabetes The inclusion of regular physical activity is critical for optimal insulin action and glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Current research suggests that Type II diabetes mellitus can be prevented and that all types of diabetes can be controlled with physical activity, largely through improvements in muscular sensitivity to insulin. This article discusses diabetes prevention and the acute and chronic benefits of exercise for individuals with diabetes, along with the importance and impact of aerobic, resistance, or combined training upon glycemic control. To undertake physical activity safely, individuals also must learn optimal management of glycemia. Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA Address for correspondence: Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM, Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (E-mail: [email protected] ). Although physical activity is a cornerstone in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM), many individuals with this chronic disease fail to become or remain regularly active ( 40 ). However, high-quality studies proving the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recent years, and this lifestyle choice was the least prescribed by physicians compared with dietary changes and medication use. It is now well established that participation in regular physical activity usually improves glycemic control and can prevent type 2 (T2) DM ( 12,21,30,32,35,48 ). In fact, lifestyle interventions have been shown to lower T2 DM risk by 58% in high-risk populations ( 30,48 ). Moreover, most benefits of physical activity upon diabetes management and prevention are realized through acute and chronic improvements in i Continue reading >>

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

People with Type 2 diabetes can reverse their condition with diet and exercise, although remission is not very common, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After one year of regular counseling sessions to encourage weight loss and physical activity, 11.5 percent of obese adults with Type 2 diabetes saw their condition at least partially reverse — meaning their blood sugar levels decreased to those of a prediabetic, without the need for medication. Just 2 percent of those who did not receive intensive counseling partially reversed their diabetes. After four years, the rate of partial diabetes remission in the counseling group declined slightly, to 7 percent. Full remission — achieving normal blood sugar levels — was rarer, with just 1.3 percent of people in the counseling group and 0.1 percent in the non-counseling group meeting this goal after one year. Type 2 diabetes has traditionally been seen as a progressive disease that is managed rather than cured. Recent studies have suggested it can be reversed with weight loss surgery, or by following an extreme diet that mimics surgery. However, until this study, little was known about the rate of long-term diabetes reversal without surgery or extreme dieting. About 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study confirms that complete Type 2 diabetes remission is rare, but that partial remission is an obtainable goal for some patients, the researchers said. Experts said that, because the definitions of complete or partial diabetes remission are arbitrary, researchers should not focus on these measures. What's more important is that patients improve their weight and blood sugar levels, as people in this study did, said Dr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise

Diabetes And Exercise

Exercise has many benefits for people with diabetes, especially when combined with healthy eating. Before you start exercising, make sure you have an individualised diabetes management plan, and a health check with your GP. An exercise physiologist can develop a personalised exercise plan for you. Check your blood glucose levels (BGLs) before, during and after exercise to see how the exercise you are doing affects them. If your BGLs are above the normal range increase your fluids to stay hydrated when you exercise. If you are unwell and your BGLs are high, avoid exercising until your BGLs have returned to the normal range. If you have type 1 diabetes and you are unwell, avoid exercise until you feel better to reduce your risk of ketoacidosis. Always carry portable hypoglycaemia treatment with you if you take insulin or sulphonylurea medication. If you have existing diabetes complications such as eye or kidney problems, check with your diabetes specialist if it is safe to do certain types of activity. On this page: Exercise has benefits for everyone, including people with diabetes, especially when combined with healthy eating. Benefits of exercise According to Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines, it’s important to accumulate 2½ to 5 hours per week of moderate exercise or 1¼ to 2½ hours of vigorous exercise to obtain health benefits. This can be broken up throughout the week to suit your needs. Exercise helps to: improve mood and sleep improve muscle strength and bone mass lower blood glucose levels (BGLs) lower cholesterol and blood pressure improve heart and blood vessel health maintain or achieve a healthy body weight reduce stress and tension improve mental health If you are at risk of type 2 diabetes, exercise can be part of a heal Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Physical Activity And Exercise

Managing Diabetes With Physical Activity And Exercise

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes - a condition where the body either doesn't make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes), or is unable to use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). Insulin is a hormone, made in the pancreas, which regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels, and allows the body to use glucose for energy. Exercise can help reduce complications of diabetes including: Heart disease and stroke Blindness and other eye problems Kidney disease Amputations caused by damage to blood vessels and nerves, leading to infection A further 86 million people have prediabetes - a health condition that increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes and other illnesses. Contents of this article: Exercise and diabetes Preventing the onset of diabetes for those with prediabetes, or managing symptoms for those who already have the condition, is crucial to maintain health and prevent complications. Exercise is one proven way to help manage diabetes. According to a joint position statement by The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association, exercise: plays a key role in preventing and controlling blood sugar levels can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes can prevent diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) Staying physically active also helps prevent diabetes-related health complications and improves overall quality of life. Exercise is useful for those with diabetes because it improves insulin sensitivity by helping the cells of the body use available insulin. Physical activity also stimulates a separate mechanism, unrelated to insulin, to allow the cells to use glucose for energy, thereby regulating blood glucose levels. Types of exercise for people with diabet Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

A consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association For decades, exercise has been considered a cornerstone of diabetes management, along with diet and medication. However, high-quality evidence on the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes was lacking until recent years. The present document summarizes the most clinically relevant recent advances related to people with type 2 diabetes and the recommendations that follow from these. Our recently published technical review on physical activity/exercise and type 2 diabetes (1) includes greater detail on individual studies, on prevention of diabetes, and on the physiology of exercise. The present statement focuses on type 2 diabetes. Issues primarily germane to type 1 diabetes will be covered in a subsequent technical review and ADA Statement. The levels of evidence used are defined by the ADA in ref. 2. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PREVENTION OF TYPE 2 DIABETES Two randomized trials each found that lifestyle interventions including ∼150 min/week of physical activity and diet-induced weight loss of 5–7% reduced the risk of progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes by 58% (3,4). A cluster-randomized trial found that diet alone, exercise alone, and combined diet and exercise were equally effective in reducting the progression from IGT to diabetes (5). Therefore, there is firm and consistent evidence that programs of increased physical activity and modest weight loss reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in individuals with IGT. EFFECTS OF STRUCTURED EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND BODY WEIGHT IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Boulé et al. (6) undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of structured exercise interventions in clinical trials of ≥8 weeks duration Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes has become a widespread epidemic, primarily because of the increasing prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, almost 24 million Americans had diabetes, with one-quarter of those, or six million, undiagnosed (261). Currently, it is estimated that almost 60 million U.S. residents also have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (BG) levels are above normal, thus greatly increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes (261). Lifetime risk estimates suggest that one in three Americans born in 2000 or later will develop diabetes, but in high-risk ethnic populations, closer to 50% may develop it (200). Type 2 diabetes is a significant cause of premature mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular disease (CVD), blindness, kidney and nerve disease, and amputation (261). Although regular physical activity (PA) may prevent or delay diabetes and its complications (10,46,89,112,176,208,259,294), most people with type 2 diabetes are not active (193). In this article, the broader term “physical activity” (defined as “bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that substantially increases energy expenditure”) is used interchangeably with “exercise,” which is defined as “a subset of PA done with the intention of developing physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular [CV], strength, and flexibility training).” The intent is to recognize that many types of physical movement may have a positive effect on physical fitness, morbidity, and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis, classification, and etiology of diabetes Currently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the use of any of the following four criteria for di Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

4 Must-do Gym Exercises To Help Prevent Diabetes

4 Must-do Gym Exercises To Help Prevent Diabetes

Are you at risk for diabetes? Diabetes is reaching an all-time high. In fact, over 29 million people have diabetes. What’s even more concerning (despite that shocking number) is that 86 million people have prediabetes, meaning they have higher than normal blood sugars and are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes within 5-10 years if they don’t make changes. The majority of Type 2 diabetes is related to excess weight, so what you eat plays a critical role. But exercise also plays an important part in burning off excess weight and improving our overall health. So if you’ve been told you have prediabetes, besides changing the way you eat, you likely need to change the way you exercise. All those changes can be confusing, so here are four gym exercises you should consider doing: 1. Skip the treadmill and hop on the elliptical. I am a big supporter of walking — walking up/down stairs, walking from the parking lot to entrances, walking during the morning or evening. I even have worn a pedometer for many months. But for many people at risk for diabetes, walking may not be enough. So the inevitable question: Should I use the treadmill, elliptical or exercise bikes? They all have pros/cons, and it’s mostly pros. For instance, exercise bikes are low impact and fairly safe. Basically anyone can jump on, and start using it. But overall, stationary bikes don’t burn that many calories and it mostly works lower body muscles. The treadmill — whether walking or running — involves a wider variety of muscles, including core muscles in the back and abs to stabilize your body. Treadmills can be tough on the joints and can cause injuries. In fact, last year about 24,400 people present to the emergency room with injuries from a treadmill. Most are minor, but serious events can oc Continue reading >>

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, exercise offers surprising benefits. As it lowers your stress levels, it lowers your blood sugar level. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy How much exercise is right for you? For people with diabetes, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends 150 minutes of aerobic exercise each week. Exercise is so important for people with diabetes that the American Diabetes Association recommends that these patients miss no more than two days of aerobic exercise in a row. There are many exercises that will benefit people with diabetes. Here are five we recommend: Walking Because anyone can do it almost anywhere, walking is the most popular exercise and one we highly recommend for people with diabetes. Thirty minutes to one hour of brisk walking, three times each week is a great, easy way to increase your physical activity. Tai Chi This Chinese form of exercise uses slow, smooth body movements to relax the mind and body. In 2009, researchers at the University of Florida studied 62 Korean women assigned to one of two groupsa control group and an exercise group that began a regular practice of Tai Chi. Those who completed the tai chi sessions showed significant improvement in blood sugar control. They also reported increased vitality, energy and mental health. Yoga A traditional form of exercise, yoga incorporates fluid movements that build flexibility, strength and balance. It is helpful for people with a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. It lowers stress and improves nerve function, which leads to an increased state of mental health and wellness.According to the ADA, yoga may improve blood glucose Continue reading >>

Exercise & Diabetes Complications | Joslin Diabetes Center

Exercise & Diabetes Complications | Joslin Diabetes Center

Exercises to Avoid When You Have Diabetes Regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. It is good for your cardiovascular system and can help control blood glucose levels . However, there are times when you need to be careful about exercising with diabetes . If you have certain diabetes complications, there are exercises that you should avoid. Michael See, MS, RCEP, Clinical Exercise Physiologist at Joslin Diabetes Center, discusses certain situations that may require you to modify your fitness program The following complications may affect your exercise routine:. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR)Patients with diabetes and active PDR should avoid activities that involve strenuous lifting; harsh, high-impact activities; or placing the head in an inverted position for extended periods of time. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may result in loss of sensation and position awareness of your feet . Repetitive exercise on insensitive feet can lead to ulceration and fractures. Limit your choice of exercise to low impact or non-weight bearing activities, says See. Advanced kidney disease Individuals with diabetes and advanced kidney disease can engage in moderate intensity activities, but should avoid strenuous activity. High blood glucose levels Individuals with type 1 diabetes should avoid exercise if fasting blood glucose is higher than 250 mg/dl and ketones are present. Caution should be used if glucose levels are higher than 300 and no ketones are present. Individuals with type 2 diabetes should avoid exercise if blood glucose is higher than 400 mg/dl. Monitoring blood glucose before, after and possibly during physical activity is necessary to keep blood glucose within an appropriate range Continue reading >>

Exercise For Diabetes Control

Exercise For Diabetes Control

In case you havent heard: Exercise is really good for people with type 2 diabetes. It helps control blood sugar levels, increases energy levels, improves heart health, and promotes emotional well-being. Barring other medical complications, the majority of people with diabetes can and should exercise for diabetes control and for better overall health and well-being. First, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. This means that your cells are better able to use available insulin to absorb sugar from the bloodstream to be used as energy for your body. Second, exercise stimulates another mechanism that allows your muscles to absorb and use sugar for energy, even without insulin. Not only does exercise lower blood sugar levels in the short term, but exercising over time also contributes to lower A1C levels over time. Leading a sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle is one of the major risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, and the high incidence of obesity and overweight among people with type 2 is also highly correlated with inactivity. Starting a workout program can lower body mass and consequently decrease the insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes; studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who exercise regularly have better A1c profiles than those who dont. Along with medical nutrition therapy, exercise is one of the first lines of defense in type 2 diabetes control. In addition, exercise is a key tool in preventing one of the leading complications of type 2 diabetes cardiovascular disease . Studies have shown that regular activity lowers triglyceride levels and blood pressure. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the following physical activity for adults with type 2 diabetes for blood sugar benefits and overall health: At least two and a half Continue reading >>

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