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Exercise Is Effective For Those With Type 2 Diabetes Because It

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising safely with type 1 diabetes can be quite a challenge. A paper from JDRF funded experts has acknowledged these challenges and published useful exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetes patients and providers. These JDRF experts are part of an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians led by York University Professor Michael Riddell. The paper, called “Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement” which has been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology provides guidelines on how to exercise safely and effectively with type 1 diabetes. Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF Chief Mission Officer and report contributor said in a press release, “Exercise has tremendous benefits for people with T1D, but it can be hard to predict how it will affect their blood glucose and how they feel during and following physical activity,” and that “The lack of reliable information on how to exercise safely has created obstacles for people with T1D who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. These consensus guidelines, as well as JDRF’s new PEAK program, are breaking down those barriers.” The T1D PEAK program (Performance in Exercise and Knowledge) is an initiative by JDRF to help educate people with type 1 as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers on how to exercise safely. Riddell, the lead author speaks to some of these benefits and barriers of exercise, “Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness and blood sugar goals, but for people living with type 1 diabetes, the fear of hypoglycemia, loss of glycemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management are major barriers,” In order to create the guidelines, Riddell and team reviewed observational studi Continue reading >>

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

If you stick with it, exercise can reduce your need for blood-sugar-lowering drugs.(ISTOCKPHOTO) You may consider exercise a nuisance, a chore, or simply a bore. But if you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you need to look at physical activity in a whole new light. Now it's a tool. Just like taking a drug or altering your diet, exercise can lower blood sugar on its own, even if you don't lose weight. "Exercising is the most underused treatment and it's so, so powerful," said Sharon Movsas, RD, a diabetes nutrition specialist at the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. For most people with diabetes, exercise is a safe and highly recommended way to reduce the risk of complications. However, check with your doctor to make sure you don't have heart problems, nerve damage, or other issues that need special consideration when you are working out. How exercise affects blood sugar In general, blood sugar drops after exercise and is lower for the next 24 to 48 hours, says Movsas. "If I take a blood sugar reading after aqua-aerobics, I usually notice it's down," says David Mair, 79, of Marquette, Mich. When you exercise, your muscles become more sensitive to insulin and absorb more glucose from the blood. However, like many aspects of type 2 diabetes, the response can be highly personal. Exercise can sometimes boost blood sugar. At first, you'll need to test your blood sugar before, after, and sometimes during exercise, to see how your body responds). Exercise also helps lower blood pressurean important benefit since high blood pressure can contribute to heart attacks, strokes, eye problems, kidney failure, and other type 2 diabetes complications. Next Page: Start slow [ pagebreak ]Start slow and work up Even if you know exercise is good Continue reading >>

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, exercise offers surprising benefits. As it lowers your stress levels, it lowers your blood sugar level. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy How much exercise is right for you? For people with diabetes, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends 150 minutes of aerobic exercise each week. Exercise is so important for people with diabetes that the American Diabetes Association recommends that these patients miss no more than two days of aerobic exercise in a row. There are many exercises that will benefit people with diabetes. Here are five we recommend: Walking Because anyone can do it almost anywhere, walking is the most popular exercise and one we highly recommend for people with diabetes. Thirty minutes to one hour of brisk walking, three times each week is a great, easy way to increase your physical activity. Tai Chi This Chinese form of exercise uses slow, smooth body movements to relax the mind and body. In 2009, researchers at the University of Florida studied 62 Korean women assigned to one of two groupsa control group and an exercise group that began a regular practice of Tai Chi. Those who completed the tai chi sessions showed significant improvement in blood sugar control. They also reported increased vitality, energy and mental health. Yoga A traditional form of exercise, yoga incorporates fluid movements that build flexibility, strength and balance. It is helpful for people with a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. It lowers stress and improves nerve function, which leads to an increased state of mental health and wellness.According to the ADA, yoga may improve blood glucose Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Sports Science Exchange 90 VOLUME 16 (2003) NUMBER 3 Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Peter A. Farrell, Ph.D. Department of Exercise and Sport Science East Carolina University Greenville, NC 27858 KEY POINTS People with diabetes mellitus—rapidly approaching one-third of the US population—either cannot produce insulin (Type 1 DM) or the insulin they produce is ineffective in stimulating the uptake of blood sugar (glucose) into the body’s cells (Type 2 DM). Accordingly, if diabetes is untreated, blood sugar rises to dangerously high levels that can eventually cause blindness, nerve damage, and other complications. Blood sugar can be controlled by the appropriate administration of insulin and other drugs and/or by the manipulation of dietary carbohydrate and exercise. During exercise, the contracting muscles produce their own insulin-like effect, causing the rapid uptake of glucose from the blood. In people without diabetes, the body naturally reduces its production of insulin to compensate; otherwise, blood glucose would fall precipitously. (A low blood glucose concentration is known as hypoglycemia.) Those with Type 1 DM (and those with Type 2 DM who use insulin to control their blood sugar) must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and their carbohydrate intake before, during, and after exercise to avoid becoming hypoglycemic. Regular exercise training is usually beneficial for those with diabetes because exercise can reverse many of the adverse metabolic effects of the disease, including the likelihood of becoming obese. Although precautions must be taken, athletes with uncomplicated diabetes (no other serious diseases) have become champions at elite levels in a wide variety of sports. INTRODUCTION Regular exercise is highly recommended for many peop Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Exercise Alone May Help Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise Alone May Help Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Engaging in a six-month moderate-intensity exercise program led to significant health improvements among people with diabetes, including decreases in fat in the abdomen, liver and around the heart, all of which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease Heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes, so exercise could be potentially lifesaving for diabetics Type 2 diabetes arises from faulty leptin and insulin signaling and resistance, both of which are directly related to lack of exercise and a diet high in starchy carbohydrates or sugar. When you exercise for diabetes prevention or treatment, intensity is key; high-intensity interval training (HIIT) should ideally be included in your fitness program to achieve optimal results By Dr. Mercola Nearly 8 percent of the US population, or close to 26 million people, have diabetes, and another 80 million have pre-diabetes,1 which means they're on their way to developing the full-blown version of the disease… if they don't do something to stop it. That something is the silver lining to this major public health epidemic, as research clearly shows lifestyle changes are extremely effective at not only preventing type 2 diabetes but also reversing it if you've already been diagnosed. Among them, exercise has recently made headlines for making major improvements in diabetics' health. Exercise Improves Diabetics' Health – Even Without Other Lifestyle Changes In a new study of people with diabetes, engaging in a six-month moderate-intensity exercise program led to significant health improvements.2 Specifically, they had decreases in fat in the abdomen, liver and around the heart, all of which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease. In case you aren't aware, heart disease Continue reading >>

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise is sure to be on your to-do list if you have diabetes. Get started with these go-to tips: 1. Make a list of fun activities. You have lots of options, and you don't have to go to a gym. What sounds good? Think about something you've always wanted to try or something you enjoyed in the past. Sports, dancing, yoga, walking, and swimming are a few ideas. Anything that raises your heart rate counts. 2. Get your doctor's OK. Let them know what you want to do. They can make sure you're ready for it. They'll also check to see if you need to change your meals, insulin, or diabetes medicines. Your doctor can also let you know if the time of day you exercise matters. 3. Check your blood sugar. Ask your doctor if you should check it before exercise. If you plan to work out for more than an hour, check your blood sugar levels regularly during your workout, so you’ll know if you need a snack. Check your blood sugar after every workout, so that you can adjust if needed. 4. Carry carbs. Always keep a small carbohydrate snack, like fruit or a fruit drink, on hand in case your blood sugar gets low. 5. Ease into it. If you're not active now, start with 10 minutes of exercise at a time. Gradually work up to 30 minutes a day. 6. Strength train at least twice a week. It can improve blood sugar control. You can lift weights or work with resistance bands. Or you can do moves like push-ups, lunges, and squats, which use your own body weight. 7. Make it a habit. Exercise, eat, and take your medicines at the same time each day to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. 8. Go public. Work out with someone who knows you have diabetes and knows what to do if your blood sugar gets too low. It's more fun, too. Also wear a medical identification tag, or carry a card that says you Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes has become a widespread epidemic, primarily because of the increasing prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, almost 24 million Americans had diabetes, with one-quarter of those, or six million, undiagnosed (261). Currently, it is estimated that almost 60 million U.S. residents also have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (BG) levels are above normal, thus greatly increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes (261). Lifetime risk estimates suggest that one in three Americans born in 2000 or later will develop diabetes, but in high-risk ethnic populations, closer to 50% may develop it (200). Type 2 diabetes is a significant cause of premature mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular disease (CVD), blindness, kidney and nerve disease, and amputation (261). Although regular physical activity (PA) may prevent or delay diabetes and its complications (10,46,89,112,176,208,259,294), most people with type 2 diabetes are not active (193). In this article, the broader term “physical activity” (defined as “bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that substantially increases energy expenditure”) is used interchangeably with “exercise,” which is defined as “a subset of PA done with the intention of developing physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular [CV], strength, and flexibility training).” The intent is to recognize that many types of physical movement may have a positive effect on physical fitness, morbidity, and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis, classification, and etiology of diabetes Currently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the use of any of the following four criteria for di Continue reading >>

The How, What, And Why Of Exercise And Type-2 Diabetes

The How, What, And Why Of Exercise And Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a common problem among the American population and worldwide. Aside from the impacted life span and quality of life, diabetes is associated with an increased burden on society in relation to medical costs which has a great economic impact. The most influential factors that have been found to be related to diabetes include genetic factors and environmental influences. While you may not be able to change your genetics you can make a change on environmental risk factors. Risk factors Obesity and inactivity are two of the main risk factors of acquiring diabetes. Environmental factors may be mostly modifiable which means that many people that acquire diabetes may have been able to avoid this condition and may also be able to reverse this condition with lifestyle changes. Diet is a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes as well as exercise and physical activity. Type 1 versus Type 2 Type 2-diabetes can be difficult to treat and can be expensive to manage and that is why avoiding this diagnosis is imperative. Diabetes occurs because the body does not produce or does not properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the pancreases that allows glucose or sugar to enter the cells. If the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin or when muscle, fat, and liver cells do not properly respond to the insulin that is there then glucose builds up in the blood which can become toxic. Hyperglycemia is a condition that occurs when there is too much glucose in the blood. Type 1-diabetes is not related to diet and inactivity but is the type of diabetes that occurs in children and young adults and is the result of the immune system destroying the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. This article will focus now on how to reduce the risk of type Continue reading >>

Exercise And Diabetes

Exercise And Diabetes

Exercise plays a key role in treating diabetes, particularly in type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes). Type 2 diabetes is becoming increasingly common and appears to be related to the growing number of people who are overweight. Why is weight gain such an issue now? Put simply, if we eat more fuel than our body needs, it's stored as fat. Physical activity burns this energy from food. But compared with 50 years ago, we are pretty inactive: we take cars for journeys of a few hundred yards we sit in trains for hours commuting we spend long periods of the day sat behind desks technology means we spend huge amounts of time watching TV, surfing the Internet, playing computer games, etc, so-called 'couch potatoes'. And for most us, feeding ourselves means a walk along supermarket aisles, not working a plot of land. All this means activity levels have dropped – the result is, as a nation, we're getting larger. How does exercise improve diabetes? Exercise reduces the body's need for insulin by keeping weight down. It also increases the body's sensitivity to insulin, so glucose is used more effectively. Insulin is needed to shift glucose from your blood into your muscles. In the absence of insulin, muscles use fat as an alternative energy source. If this goes on too long, it leads to acidosis – which can be fatal. As long as you have enough insulin in your body, your muscles burn glucose during exercise, naturally reducing your blood sugar level. For all types of diabetes, exercise: lowers blood sugar levels increases the effectiveness of insulin in your body lowers blood pressure lowers levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and increases good cholesterol (HDL) increases fat loss helps weight loss builds muscle mass reduces stress improves wellbeing improves circulation Continue reading >>

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

Small losses, big gains "Because most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight, meal planning and physical activity usually focus on gradual weight loss, something on the order of two to three pounds per month, " says Paris Roach, MD, an endocrinologist with Indiana University Health and the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Indiana University School of Medicine. "Exercise is beneficial to metabolism independent of weight loss in that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance," says Dr. Roach. Just a five to ten percent reduction from your starting weight can have significant effects on blood glucose levels. That's good news if you haven't broken a sweat in a while. In addition, you'll also gain muscle strength, improve cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, balance, stamina, mood and overall good feeling. This workout normalizes blood sugar for type 2 diabetics. Keep an eye on blood sugar Exercise will not only help control blood sugar levels but also help you shed weight and keep your heart healthy. It's important you keep an eye on your blood sugar because any physical activity makes you more sensitive to insulin. "When you exercise, your body becomes more efficient at using insulin and this can lower blood sugar, both during exercise and up to 24 hours after," says Mark Heyman, clinical psychologist, certified diabetes educator, and vice-president of Clinical Operations and Innovation at One Drop, a mobile app that educates and coaches diabetics. Because blood sugar can drop dangerously low, check it before you exercise and again if you feel light-headed or weak during exercise, he says. "If your blood sugar is low (below 70mg/dl), eat 15 grams of simple carbohydrates, such as orange juice, glucose tablets or candy," says Dr. H Continue reading >>

Exercising With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercising With Type 2 Diabetes

By Dean Anderson, Fitness & Behavior Expert 6/20/2007 If your doctor has diagnosed you with Type 2 diabetes, then she has probably already told you about the importance of adding exercise to your treatment plan. Physical activity can help you improve your blood sugar control, lose weight, and reduce your risk of heart disease, peripheral artery disease and nerve problems that are often associated with diabetes. In many cases, the right combination of diet and exercise can even help eliminate the need for medication for people with Type 2 diabetes. But before you get started, you need to understand how exercise influences blood glucose regulation, and how to avoid potential problems, minimize risks, and recognize when you may need to get additional information or support from your health care provider. *The general information in this article is not a substitute for talking to your health care provider before you begin an exercise program, or if you experience any problems in connection with your exercise. How Exercise Benefits People with Type 2 Diabetes In addition to boosting your energy levels, mood, and capacity to burn calories for weight loss, regular exercise can lead to the following benefits: Improved blood sugar control by enhancing insulin sensitivity. Exercising on a regular basis makes muscles use insulin better. When muscles are able to use insulin better, they are able to pull more glucose from the bloodstream to use for energy. The more vigorously you exercise, the more glucose youll use, and the longer the positive effects on your blood glucose levels will last. Increased insulin sensitivity. Type-2 diabetics who exercise regularly need less insulin to move glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells that need it. Reduced need for medication. Combi Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

A consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association For decades, exercise has been considered a cornerstone of diabetes management, along with diet and medication. However, high-quality evidence on the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes was lacking until recent years. The present document summarizes the most clinically relevant recent advances related to people with type 2 diabetes and the recommendations that follow from these. Our recently published technical review on physical activity/exercise and type 2 diabetes (1) includes greater detail on individual studies, on prevention of diabetes, and on the physiology of exercise. The present statement focuses on type 2 diabetes. Issues primarily germane to type 1 diabetes will be covered in a subsequent technical review and ADA Statement. The levels of evidence used are defined by the ADA in ref. 2. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PREVENTION OF TYPE 2 DIABETES Two randomized trials each found that lifestyle interventions including ∼150 min/week of physical activity and diet-induced weight loss of 5–7% reduced the risk of progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes by 58% (3,4). A cluster-randomized trial found that diet alone, exercise alone, and combined diet and exercise were equally effective in reducting the progression from IGT to diabetes (5). Therefore, there is firm and consistent evidence that programs of increased physical activity and modest weight loss reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in individuals with IGT. EFFECTS OF STRUCTURED EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND BODY WEIGHT IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Boulé et al. (6) undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of structured exercise interventions in clinical trials of ≥8 weeks duration Continue reading >>

Chapter 19: Nutrition For Diabetes Mellitus

Chapter 19: Nutrition For Diabetes Mellitus

1. A person is diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus if his or her fasting blood glucose level on two occasions is greater than _____ mg/dL. a. 90 b. 120 c. 126 d. 156 ANS: C Diabetes mellitus is diagnosed as fasting blood glucose level >126 mg/dL on two occasions. DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge REF: Page 401 TOP: Nursing Process: Assessment MSC: Client Needs: Physiological integrity 2. Long-term complications of diabetes mellitus include a. arthritis, rheumatism, and osteoporosis. b. retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. c. impaired immunity and opportunistic infections. d. dermatitis, nephrotic syndrome, and detached retina. ANS: B Long-term complications of diabetes mellitus include retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus can increase risk and severity of infection indirectly due to poor circulation and high blood glucose levels, but immunity is not impaired. Arthritis, rheumatism, osteoporosis, dermatitis, nephritic syndrome, and detached retina are not associated with diabetes. DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge REF: Pages 401-402 TOP: Nursing Process: Assessment MSC: Client Needs: Physiological integrity 3. The type of diabetes therapy that seems to be most effective in decreasing and delaying the complications of diabetes is a. psychotherapy. b. intensive therapy. c. combined therapy. d. conventional therapy. ANS: B Intensive therapy is most effective in decreasing and delaying the complications of diabetes because it allows better control of blood glucose levels. Psychotherapy may help patients cope with psychological concerns about their disease, but will not delay complications. Conventional therapy may help prevent complications if blood glucose levels are well controlled, but this is less likely than with intensive therapy. Combined the Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D.; Marion Franz, M.S., R.D., C.D.E.; Guyton Hornsby, Ph.D., C.D.E.; Andrea Kriska, Ph.D., FACSM; David Marrero, Ph.D.; Irma Ullrich, M.D.; Larry S. Verity, Ph.D., FACSM Physical activity, including appropriate endurance and resistance training, is a major therapeutic modality for type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, too often physical activity is an underutilized therapy. Favorable changes in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity usually deteriorate within 72 h of the last exercise session; consequently, regular physical activity is imperative to sustain glucose-lowering effects and improved insulin sensitivity. Individuals with type 2 diabetes should strive to achieve a minimum cumulative total of 1000 kcalwk-1 from physical activities. Those with type 2 diabetes generally have a lower level of fitness (VO2max) than nondiabetic individuals, and therefore exercise intensity should be at a comfortable level (RPE 1012) in the initial periods of training and should progress cautiously as tolerance for activity improves. Resistance training has the potential to improve muscle strength and endurance, enhance flexibility and body composition, decrease risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and result in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Modifications to exercise type and/or intensity may be necessary for those who have complications of diabetes. Individuals with type 2 diabetes may develop autonomic neuropathy, which affects the heart rate response to exercise, and as a result, ratings of perceived exertion rather than heart rate may need to be used for moderating intensity of physical activity. Although walking may be the most convenient low-impact mode, some persons, because of peripheral neuropathy and/or foot problems, may need Continue reading >>

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