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Exercise For Diabetics

Top 8 Exercises For Diabetics

Top 8 Exercises For Diabetics

As a diabetic, you need to find ways to control your blood sugar levels. Getting your diabetes under control will help to prevent infection and other serious health problems. This is more than just following a healthy and balanced diet that is low in simple carbs and refined sugar. You need to focus on exercise. Doing 150 minutes of moderate exercise a week will help you keep your glucose levels to a minimum. You support your whole system, boosting the release of happy hormones and reducing your weight. In fact, exercise can help to reverse your diabetes, making it less likely that you will be on medication for the rest of your life. The last thing you want to do is throw yourself into exercise, though. You want to focus on exercises that are light on your joints and will help build your muscles. Its important to avoid injury, which is common for those new to exercise. With that in mind, here are eight exercises that are perfect for diabetics to do daily. One of the best types of exercises to do when youre starting out is walking. It does more than just get you from A to B. Walking is one of those lightweight exercises that gets your blood pumping and lungs working. Its also prescribed by doctors around the country when it comes to their Type II diabetes patients. Were not talking about a gentle stroll here. When it comes to walking, you need to make sure you pick up the pace a little. Try a power walk or a level of intensity just slightly lower. Its important to feel like its working your legs and your breathing to gain any benefit at all. Try just three days a week of walking on your lunch break. You can work your way up to five days. Dont forget to take a friend with you, so you have someone to talk to and keep you entertained. Or you can pick up your favorite music Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Physical Activity And Exercise

Managing Diabetes With Physical Activity And Exercise

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes - a condition where the body either doesn't make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes), or is unable to use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). Insulin is a hormone, made in the pancreas, which regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels, and allows the body to use glucose for energy. Exercise can help reduce complications of diabetes including: Heart disease and stroke Blindness and other eye problems Kidney disease Amputations caused by damage to blood vessels and nerves, leading to infection A further 86 million people have prediabetes - a health condition that increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes and other illnesses. Contents of this article: Exercise and diabetes Preventing the onset of diabetes for those with prediabetes, or managing symptoms for those who already have the condition, is crucial to maintain health and prevent complications. Exercise is one proven way to help manage diabetes. According to a joint position statement by The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association, exercise: plays a key role in preventing and controlling blood sugar levels can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes can prevent diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) Staying physically active also helps prevent diabetes-related health complications and improves overall quality of life. Exercise is useful for those with diabetes because it improves insulin sensitivity by helping the cells of the body use available insulin. Physical activity also stimulates a separate mechanism, unrelated to insulin, to allow the cells to use glucose for energy, thereby regulating blood glucose levels. Types of exercise for people with diabet Continue reading >>

The Best Exercises If You Have Diabetes

The Best Exercises If You Have Diabetes

Fighting Diabetes? Do It Actively Exercise is good for pretty much everyone. It’s especially important if you have diabetes. Workouts can do all kinds of things for you, like lower your blood sugar and blood pressure, boost your energy, and help you sleep better. If physical, high-impact exercises aren’t for you, there are plenty of other options. It’s a simple way to get exercise and fresh air. It can lower your stress, too. A brisk stroll of 30 minutes to an hour 3 or 4 times a week is one way to hit your target. It’s easy to get started: Take Fido around the neighborhood or walk to the store instead of driving. Once you’ve made it a habit, it can be rewarding -- and motivating -- to track your steps and your progress. This can be a fun way to get your exercise. Just shake your groove thing for 25 minutes, 3 days a week to help your heart, lower your blood sugar, ease stress levels, and burn calories. You don’t need a partner to get started, either. A chair can be good support if you need it. This is one aerobic exercise that doesn’t strain your joints like other ones can. It also lets you work muscles in your upper and lower body at the same time. Hitting the water is also good for your heart. It can also lower cholesterol and help you burn serious calories. If a lifeguard is on duty, let her know you have diabetes. Fighting diabetes can be as easy as riding a bicycle. Whether you use a stationary one or hit the road, 30 minutes a day 3 to 5 times a week can get your heart rate up, burn blood sugar, and help you lose weight without hurting your knees or other joints. This can be a healthy and easy way to burn calories and get your heart and lungs working faster, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. Going up and down stairs for 3 minutes about an hour Continue reading >>

10 Exercises To Get You Fit While You Sit

10 Exercises To Get You Fit While You Sit

10 Exercises to Get You Fit While You Sit Arthritis or another condition got you down? These seated exercises will help Exercise is crucial for strength and flexibility. You know that. You might have even heard about studies that link sedentary lifestyles with increased insulin resistance and earlier death. What you might not know: Its possible to exercise with a chronic conditionwith your doctors OK, of course. In fact, for people who use wheelchairs or who have a limited range of motion due to arthritis, loss of feeling in the feet (often a result of diabetes-related nerve damage), or other chronic conditions, improving strength through exercise is essential to being able to do the activities necessary for daily living. The following moves can help you strengthen and flex your muscles and jointsextra important if you have arthritis in your knees or hips. Even if you dont work up as much of a sweat as you might during a more traditional workout, you will feel your muscles working. Seated exercises can help offset the negative effects of having to sit down most or all of the time: A recent study of people with diabetes, published in the journal Diabetes Care, found that doing some type of light activity every 30 minutes improves metabolism. Itll also benefit your heart health and blood glucose management. Whats more, your joints, bones, and muscles will thank you for helping them stay limber and strong. Safety Note: Talk to your doctor before making any big changes to your exercise plan. A. Begin in Position No. 1: Sit up straight with your back supported by a chair and feet and knees shoulder-width apart. B. Slowly straighten your right knee, lifting your foot until it is straight out in front of you. Flex your ankle and point your toes toward the ceiling. Lower your Continue reading >>

Exercise For Diabetes Control

Exercise For Diabetes Control

By the dLife Editors In case you haven’t heard: Exercise is really good for people with type 2 diabetes. It helps control blood sugar levels, increases energy levels, improves heart health, and promotes emotional well-being. Barring other medical complications, the majority of people with diabetes can and should exercise for diabetes control and for better overall health and well-being. How does exercise lower blood sugar? Exercise lowers blood sugar in two ways: First, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. This means that your cells are better able to use available insulin to absorb sugar from the bloodstream to be used as energy for your body. Second, exercise stimulates another mechanism that allows your muscles to absorb and use sugar for energy, even without insulin. Not only does exercise lower blood sugar levels in the short term, but exercising over time also contributes to lower A1C levels over time. How important is exercise? Leading a sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle is one of the major risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, and the high incidence of obesity and overweight among people with type 2 is also highly correlated with inactivity. Starting a workout program can lower body mass and consequently decrease the insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes; studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who exercise regularly have better A1c profiles than those who don’t. Along with medical nutrition therapy, exercise is one of the first lines of defense in type 2 diabetes control. In addition, exercise is a key tool in preventing one of the leading complications of type 2 diabetes—cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that regular activity lowers triglyceride levels and blood pressure. How much exercise do you need? The American Diabetes Continue reading >>

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

Small losses, big gains "Because most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight, meal planning and physical activity usually focus on gradual weight loss, something on the order of two to three pounds per month, " says Paris Roach, MD, an endocrinologist with Indiana University Health and the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Indiana University School of Medicine. "Exercise is beneficial to metabolism independent of weight loss in that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance," says Dr. Roach. Just a five to ten percent reduction from your starting weight can have significant effects on blood glucose levels. That's good news if you haven't broken a sweat in a while. In addition, you'll also gain muscle strength, improve cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, balance, stamina, mood and overall good feeling. This workout normalizes blood sugar for type 2 diabetics. Keep an eye on blood sugar Exercise will not only help control blood sugar levels but also help you shed weight and keep your heart healthy. It's important you keep an eye on your blood sugar because any physical activity makes you more sensitive to insulin. "When you exercise, your body becomes more efficient at using insulin and this can lower blood sugar, both during exercise and up to 24 hours after," says Mark Heyman, clinical psychologist, certified diabetes educator, and vice-president of Clinical Operations and Innovation at One Drop, a mobile app that educates and coaches diabetics. Because blood sugar can drop dangerously low, check it before you exercise and again if you feel light-headed or weak during exercise, he says. "If your blood sugar is low (below 70mg/dl), eat 15 grams of simple carbohydrates, such as orange juice, glucose tablets or candy," says Dr. H Continue reading >>

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, exercise offers surprising benefits. As it lowers your stress levels, it lowers your blood sugar level. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy How much exercise is right for you? For people with diabetes, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends 150 minutes of aerobic exercise each week. Exercise is so important for people with diabetes that the American Diabetes Association recommends that these patients miss no more than two days of aerobic exercise in a row. There are many exercises that will benefit people with diabetes. Here are five we recommend: Walking Because anyone can do it almost anywhere, walking is the most popular exercise and one we highly recommend for people with diabetes. Thirty minutes to one hour of brisk walking, three times each week is a great, easy way to increase your physical activity. Tai Chi This Chinese form of exercise uses slow, smooth body movements to relax the mind and body. In 2009, researchers at the University of Florida studied 62 Korean women assigned to one of two groupsa control group and an exercise group that began a regular practice of Tai Chi. Those who completed the tai chi sessions showed significant improvement in blood sugar control. They also reported increased vitality, energy and mental health. Yoga A traditional form of exercise, yoga incorporates fluid movements that build flexibility, strength and balance. It is helpful for people with a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. It lowers stress and improves nerve function, which leads to an increased state of mental health and wellness.According to the ADA, yoga may improve blood glucose Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are critical foci for blood glucose management and overall health in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recommendations and precautions vary depending on individual characteristics and health status. In this Position Statement, we provide a clinically oriented review and evidence-based recommendations regarding physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes. Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is planned, structured physical activity. Exercise improves blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight loss, and improves well-being (1,2). Regular exercise may prevent or delay type 2 diabetes development (3). Regular exercise also has considerable health benefits for people with type 1 diabetes (e.g., improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, etc.) (4). The challenges related to blood glucose management vary with diabetes type, activity type, and presence of diabetes-related complications (5,6). Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. TYPES AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF DIABETES AND PREDIABETES Physical activity recommendations and precautions may vary by diabetes type. The primary types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (5%–10% of cases) results from cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, producing insulin deficiency (7). Although it can occur at any age, β-cell destruction rates vary, typically occurring more rapidly in youth than in adults. Type 2 diabetes (90%–95% of cases) resul Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

8 Best Workouts For Diabetes

8 Best Workouts For Diabetes

No doubt you’ve heard about the wonders of exercise (how it helps you lose weight, sleep better, and feel more energetic), but for people who have diabetes, exercise is absolutely essential. "Trying to manage diabetes without being physically active is like a singer performing without a microphone," says Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, author of Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical… Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Exercise

Benefits Of Exercise

Exercising 4–7 times per week for at least 30 minutes: Aerobic exercise, 4 to 7 times per week for at least 30 minutes, has a long list of health benefits. A few examples of aerobic exercise are brisk walking, swimming, cycling and dancing. Some of the benefits of exercise are: Usually lowers your blood sugar. Improves insulin sensitivity, which means your body’s insulin works better. Note: You may need an adjustment in your diabetes medication or insulin dose to help prevent the blood sugar from going too low. Ask your health care provider for advice. Reduces body fat. Helps to build and tone muscles. Lowers your risk for heart disease. Improves circulation. Preserves bone mass. Reduces stress and enhances quality of life. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Get a move on Exercise is safe—and highly recommended—for most people with type 2 diabetes, including those with complications. Along with diet and medication, exercise will help you lower blood sugar and lose weight. However, the prospect of diving into a workout routine may be intimidating. If you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in years. If that's the case, don't worry: It's fine to start slow and work up. These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. Try quick workouts As long as you're totaling 30 minutes of exercise each day, several brief workouts are fine, says George Griffing, MD, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We need people with diabetes up and moving," Dr. Griffing says. "If you can do your exercise in one 30 minute stretch, fine. But if not, break it up into increments you can manage that add up to at least 30 minutes each day." Focus on overall activity Increase activity in general—such as walking or climbing stairs—rather than a particular type of exercise. However, don't rely on housework or other daily activity as your sole exercise. Too often, people overestimate the amount of exercise they get and underestimate the amount of calories they consume. (A step-counting pedometer can help.) Get a pedometer Stanford University researchers conducted a review of 26 studies looking at the use of pedometers as motivation for physical activity. Published in 2007, the review found that people who used a pedometer increased their activity by 27%. Having a goal of 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) was important, even if the goal wasn't reached. Pedometer users lost more weight, had a greater drop in blood pr Continue reading >>

Exercises To Avoid When You Have Diabetes

Exercises To Avoid When You Have Diabetes

Regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. It is good for your cardiovascular system and can help control blood glucose levels. However, there are times when you need to be careful about exercising with diabetes. If you have certain diabetes complications, there are exercises that you should avoid. Michael See, MS, RCEP, Clinical Exercise Physiologist at Joslin Diabetes Center, discusses certain situations that may require you to modify your fitness program The following complications may affect your exercise routine:. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR)—Patients with diabetes and active PDR should avoid activities that involve strenuous lifting; harsh, high-impact activities; or placing the head in an inverted position for extended periods of time. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy— Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may result in loss of sensation and position awareness of your feet. Repetitive exercise on insensitive feet can lead to ulceration and fractures. “Limit your choice of exercise to low impact or non-weight bearing activities,” says See. Advanced kidney disease— Individuals with diabetes and advanced kidney disease can engage in moderate intensity activities, but should avoid strenuous activity. High blood glucose levels— Individuals with type 1 diabetes should avoid exercise if fasting blood glucose is higher than 250 mg/dl and ketones are present. Caution should be used if glucose levels are higher than 300 and no ketones are present. Individuals with type 2 diabetes should avoid exercise if blood glucose is higher than 400 mg/dl. Monitoring blood glucose before, after and possibly during physical activity is necessary to keep blood glucose within an appropriate range. Always consult with an exe Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

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