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Exercise And Lifestyle For Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise is recommended for everyone with diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes exercise provides many benefits—improved cardiovascular health, a psychological lift, stronger bones, stronger muscles and more restful sleep. It evens aids in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. In fact, there have been studies that demonstrate that people with type 1 who exercise have lower mortality rates. But one thing it hasn’t been proven to do is decrease A1C levels. When people with type 2 diabetes engaged in regular exercise, their A1C levels drop. The research looking at exercise benefits in terms of glucose control for people with type 1 isn’t as sanguine. The reason there isn’t always a positive impact on A1C has to do with the ever present risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia whenever a person with type 1 diabetes exercises. Both exercise-related hypo- and hyperglycemia occur in people with type 1 diabetes because the physiology of exercise works a bit differently. When we exercise we need more glucose to fuel our muscles. So in people without diabetes, glucagon is activated and causes the liver and muscles to breakdown glycogen in a process called glycogenolysis . At the same time, the liver starts to replenish its glucose stores from amino acid backbones through gluconeogenesis, so it can have backup glucose for extended periods of activity. Concurrently the level of insulin declines, weighing the hormonal milieu away from energy storage to energy generation. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin levels, injected exogenously, don’t decline. This blunts glucogenolysis and continues to enhance glucose uptake by the muscles. While the muscles need glucose, too-rapid consumption depletes the glucose in the blood stream. If production of glucose by the li Continue reading >>

Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising After being diagnosed with Diabetes type 1, exercising became an essential part of my daily routine — not only because it is essential to stay in shape but also because exercising allows the body to become more sensitive to insulin’s action, which may help decrease the volume of insulin injected. The reason why this happens is because when exercising we end up increasing cells’ activity. This means that cells start requiring a higher flux of energy — which comes in the form of glucose — in order to function properly. As a result, our cell membranes become more sensitive towards glucose, allowing an increased flow from the blood stream into the cell. Since exercising requires a higher quantity of glucose in the interior of cells, the glucose level in the bloodstream decreases, which can be dangerous if the glucose level goes below 70mg/dL — a condition known as hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia symptoms include confusion, shaking, and it can also affect one’s vision. In more extreme cases, diabetics can lose consciousness or even go into a coma. One thing that experience has showed me is that there are simple things that diabetics can do to avoid any of these hypoglycemic situations, namely: controlling glucose levels before and after exercising. eating long lasting carbs such as bread some time before exercising, as these type of carbs take longer time to be processed by our body. Therefore, they provide a long lasting energy supply. ingesting around 15g of sugar before exercising — because your glucose needs will immeadiately increase, it is highly recommended to eat a small portion of sugar before the exercise, especially because sugar is easy and fast to digest. drink water. What kind of Exercise is Best for the Type 1 Diabetic? This was also a ve Continue reading >>

Exercise

Exercise

Everybody benefits from regular exercise. If you have diabetes, or are at risk of diabetes it plays an important role in keeping you healthy. For a person with diabetes exercise helps: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress. Warning- Don’t take part in strenuous physical activity if you are feeling unwell or have ketones present in your blood or urine. Before commencing a regular exercise program see your doctor for a full medical examination. Initially take it slow - you don’t want to start off too hard, if you are not used to the exercise you will be sore the next day and this will not make exercising a fun experience! Over time, you can slowly increase the intensity of the exercise. If you have any diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, you should talk to your doctor or an accredited exercise physiologist before you start increasing the intensity of your exercise. Anything that gets you moving. Here are some suggestions for you to discuss with your doctor: Walking Swimming Cycling/ exercise bike Dancing Gardening Golfing Weight training Tai Chi Water aerobics Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e.g. taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting up to change the TV station instead of using the remote control, housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time. For good health, you should be doing about 30 minutes of exercise every day. If this is not possible, then this time can be divided in 3 x 10 minutes sessions. You can break up exercise throughout the day. If you need to lose weight, 45-60 minutes everyday. You do not need to puff to gain the benefi Continue reading >>

Nutrition, Fitness And Lifestyle Choices For Type 1 Diabetes

Nutrition, Fitness And Lifestyle Choices For Type 1 Diabetes

Video of the Day Nutrition and Optimal Dietary Habits Food (mainly carbohydrates) is one of the major influences on blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Recommendations for the use of added sugars for people with diabetes have changed. They have gone from avoidance of sugars to allowing a small amount of sugar within the context of a healthy meal plan. The right amounts and types of food are essential, and diets should be designed on an individual basis by medical professionals. People with Type 2 diabetes can sometimes be treated with diet and exercise alone, however people with Type 1 diabetes must also have insulin injections along with a diet and exercise plan. Objectives of Food Management No matter which of the food plans are used, the objectives of diet plans are the same: • To balance insulin and carbohydrate intake in order to keep the blood glucose values as close to normal as possible • To maintain a normal weight • To keep the blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) and lipoproteins (LDL and HDL) at desired levels • To help prevent high blood pressure • To improve overall health by maintaining the best possible nutrition • To help avoid long-term diabetes complications • To help attain normal growth and development for children • To help prevent severe hypoglycemia Since eating carbohydrates increases blood sugar levels, one diet approach is to count the intake of carbohydrates and then administer the appropriate amount of insulin. It is used with both multiple daily insulin injections or with insulin pump therapy. For this approach to be effective, the patient must learn to read food labels and accurately assess the number of grams of carbohydrates they are eating. The correct dose of insulin per number of grams of carbohydrates (i Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Exercise With Type 1

5 Tips For Exercise With Type 1

A diabetes life coach shares her secrets for good blood glucose control while working out. Throughout July, we’re featuring excerpts from Ginger Vieira’s new book, Dealing with Diabetes Burnout. In this final edited excerpt from the book, the longtime life coach and diabetes advocate shares the lessons she’s learned from years of exercise with Type 1 diabetes. There is no doubt that exercising with diabetes is about one million times more challenging than exercising without diabetes, particularly if you take insulin. Low blood sugars and high blood sugars are major party-poopers in the middle of a walk, yoga, spinning class, tai chi, or strength-training. I’m here to tell you that it can be done and you can enjoy exercise, but it takes a little work, a little more effort, and a bunch of self-study. sponsor When I personally started to become really active and committed to exercising regularly, I was working really hard to balance my blood sugar during things like Ashtanga yoga, strength-training, and various forms of cardio like power-walking and the stairmaster. And it wasn’t easy, but at the very same time I was learning with the help of my trainer, Andrew, about what was literally going on in my body during different types of exercise. Learning about this basic science, taking a deep breath, and viewing my body as a science experiment is the only reason I am able to exercise happily and confidently today. Read “25 Facts to Know About Exercise and Type 1 Diabetes.” Here are five lessons I’ve learned on balancing blood sugars during exercise: 1. Understand What Type of Exercise You’re Doing Jogging and strength-training will both have very different impacts on your blood sugar, even though your heart rate may rise during both. Cardiovascular or aerobi Continue reading >>

Exercising With Diabetes

Exercising With Diabetes

Exercise is paramount for good health and for managing your diabetes, plus it can be incredibly fun. Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, exercise plays a significant role in controlling your condition. Exercising with diabetes assists with maintaining your goal blood glucose levels, and it can help insulin or diabetes medications work more efficiently. Exercise also works to keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels in check, helping to prevent long-term diabetes complications. In addition, exercise can actually help stabilize and regulate your blood glucose levels for hours—even after you stop exercising. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults should strive for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (eg, brisk walking) per week and 2 or more days a week doing muscle-strengthening exercises (eg, lifting weights).1 In addition, a well-rounded exercise routine should also incorporate flexibility (eg, yoga) exercises. But you don't have to fit in all your exercise requirements in on one day. In fact, you can break your workouts into smaller increments throughout the day. For example, instead of walking for 30 minutes straight, break it up into three 10-minute segments. If you're new to exercise, you can make an appointment with a physical therapist or personal trainer. They can teach you how to incorporate exercise into your lifestyle, as well as specific exercises you can do to help you manage your condition. We've broken this article into 2 sections: exercising with type 1 diabetes and exercising with type 2 diabetes. Exercising with Type 1 Diabetes When you exercise, your body—more specifically, your muscles—uses glucose as fuel (energy). Exercise has a similar effect as insulin on the glucos Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes

During physical activity, whole-body oxygen consumption may increase by as much as 20-fold, and even greater increases may occur in the working muscles. To meet its energy needs under these circumstances, skeletal muscle uses, at a greatly increased rate, its own stores of glycogen and triglycerides, as well as free fatty acids (FFAs) derived from the breakdown of adipose tissue triglycerides and glucose released from the liver. To preserve central nervous system function, blood glucose levels are remarkably well maintained during physical activity. Hypoglycemia during physical activity rarely occurs in nondiabetic individuals. The metabolic adjustments that preserve normoglycemia during physical activity are in large part hormonally mediated. A decrease in plasma insulin and the presence of glucagon appear to be necessary for the early increase in hepatic glucose production during physical activity, and during prolonged exercise, increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamines appear to play a key role. These hormonal adaptations are essentially lost in insulin-deficient patients with type 1 diabetes. As a consequence, when such individuals have too little insulin in their circulation due to inadequate therapy, an excessive release of counterinsulin hormones during physical activity may increase already high levels of glucose and ketone bodies and can even precipitate diabetic ketoacidosis. Conversely, the presence of high levels of insulin, due to exogenous insulin administration, can attenuate or even prevent the increased mobilization of glucose and other substrates induced by physical activity, and hypoglycemia may ensue. Similar concerns exist in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin or sulfonylurea therapy; however, in general, hypoglycemia during physical act Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Exercise is an absolutely vital part of type 1 diabetes treatment. Staying fit and active throughout your life has many benefits, but the biggest one for people with diabetes is this: it helps you control diabetes and prevent long-term complications. Exercise makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. Exercise benefits people with type 1 because it increases your insulin sensitivity. In other words, after exercise, your body doesn't need as much insulin to process carbohydrates. If your child has type 1 diabetes, making sure he or she gets enough exercise is not only a great way to help manage his or her diabetes but also instill healthy habits from an early age. To learn more about how to safely incorporate exercise into your child's routine, read our article about physical activity for children with type 1 diabetes. Exercise can also help people with type 1 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. As you can read about this in our article on type 1 diabetes complications, people with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there are all the traditional benefits of exercise: Lower blood pressure Better control of weight Leaner, stronger muscles Stronger bones More energy One person who certainly understands the benefits of exercise in managing type 1 diabetes is Jay Cutler, quarterback for the Chicago Bears. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, but the disease hasn't interfered with his football career. To learn more, read our article about Jay Cutler's experience with type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising safely with type 1 diabetes can be quite a challenge. A paper from JDRF funded experts has acknowledged these challenges and published useful exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetes patients and providers. These JDRF experts are part of an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians led by York University Professor Michael Riddell. The paper, called “Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement” which has been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology provides guidelines on how to exercise safely and effectively with type 1 diabetes. Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF Chief Mission Officer and report contributor said in a press release, “Exercise has tremendous benefits for people with T1D, but it can be hard to predict how it will affect their blood glucose and how they feel during and following physical activity,” and that “The lack of reliable information on how to exercise safely has created obstacles for people with T1D who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. These consensus guidelines, as well as JDRF’s new PEAK program, are breaking down those barriers.” The T1D PEAK program (Performance in Exercise and Knowledge) is an initiative by JDRF to help educate people with type 1 as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers on how to exercise safely. Riddell, the lead author speaks to some of these benefits and barriers of exercise, “Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness and blood sugar goals, but for people living with type 1 diabetes, the fear of hypoglycemia, loss of glycemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management are major barriers,” In order to create the guidelines, Riddell and team reviewed observational studi Continue reading >>

Physical Activity And Type 1 Diabetes

Physical Activity And Type 1 Diabetes

Sheri R. Colberg , PhD, FACSM,1 Remmert Laan , BA, MBA,2 Eyal Dassau , PhD,3 and David Kerr , MBChB, MD, FRCPE2 1Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA 2William Sansum Diabetes Center, Santa Barbara, CA, USA 3Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM, Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA. Email: [email protected] Copyright 2015 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. While being physically active bestows many health benefits on individuals with type 1 diabetes, their overall blood glucose control is not enhanced without an effective balance of insulin dosing and food intake to maintain euglycemia before, during, and after exercise of all types. At present, a number of technological advances are already available to insulin users who desire to be physically active with optimal blood glucose control, although a number of limitations to those devices remain. In addition to continued improvements to existing technologies and introduction of new ones, finding ways to integrate all of the available data to optimize blood glucose control and performance during and following exercise will likely involve development of smart calculators, enhanced closed-loop systems that are able to use additional inputs and learn, and social aspects that allow devices to meet the needs of the users. Keywords: exercise, technology, insulin, artificial pancreas, physical activity, type 1 diabetes Physical activity (PA) for people of all ages living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with many well-established health benefits, including improved cardiovascular fitness, better bone-health and enh Continue reading >>

Start Working Out With T1d

Start Working Out With T1d

WRITTEN BY: Christel Oerum Editor’s Note: Christel is a blogger, personal trainer, diabetes advocate, fitness bikini champion and fitness personality. She has been living with Type 1 diabetes since 1997. Most of us like the idea of exercising and being active. We know that it’s good for us and that we probably should turn it up a notch, but there is so much information out there on what to do, when to do it, fancy new diets, etc., that it’s hard to know what to believe. When you then throw in Type 1 diabetes, it may feel like information overload and I unfortunately do see people just give up sometimes. It’s simply too much and there’s too little guidance on what to do and how to successfully exercise with diabetes. In this post, I’ll try to give you the tools you need to get started on a safe and effective workout routine. Set realistic goals Goal setting is one of the most overlooked, but in my opinion most important, factors in successfully starting a workout regime, whether you have Type 1 diabetes or not. Just wanting to be healthy and fit is a noble goal, but it’s not specific enough to keep you motivated and give you a clear path to success. I always ask my clients to spend the time necessary to think about what you really want and write down very specific short and long-term goals. The key word here is to be realistic. A long-term goal might be to run a marathon while a short-term goal might be a 5K. It could be improving your strength by X%, do 10 pushups, be able to walk around the block without being winded, lose X pounds, or whatever is important and motivating for you. There are no bad health goals, only too vague ones. When you have a clear goal, you can start working towards it, measure your progress, and make changes to your plan if you hav Continue reading >>

Exercise Guidelines

Exercise Guidelines

Find exercise guidelines for your type: In this section, you will find: Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to use sugars, starches, fats and proteins. Because the body needs various fuels for energy, this disease disrupts normal energy metabolism both at rest and during physical exercise. Following digestion, a hormone called insulin is released into the blood from the pancreas. Among insulin’s primary roles is its ability to allow carbohydrates (absorbed in the form of glucose) and proteins to enter muscle cells, where they are stored or used for energy. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce enough—or even any—insulin to allow this process to occur. Consequently, glucose is unable to enter cells and builds up in the blood. Because people with type 1 diabetes have insufficient insulin production, daily insulin injections are required to maintain glucose levels as close to normal as possible. Thus, individuals with type 1 diabetes are considered insulin-dependent. It is imperative for those with type 1 diabetes to regulate their blood glucose (blood sugar) levels to help reduce complications associated with this disease. If glucose levels remain unchecked for extended periods, people with type 1 diabetes run the risk of developing heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and nerve dysfunction. Therefore, people with type 1 diabetes must always be careful about the amounts and types of foods they eat, as well as when they exercise and what types of physical activity they perform. How does exercise help? Because exercise uses glucose as a fuel, it is an effective way to control blood sugar levels. Exercise has an insulin-like effect on glucose, enhancing its uptake into cells and counteracting elevated blood glucose levels that frequently occur after eating. With exercise, the amount of insuli Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

During activity, injected or pumped insulin cannot be 'shut off' like the body's own insulin, so too much glucose is taken up by both muscle contractions and the high levels of insulin, says Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. To avoid hypoglycemia when doing physical activity, monitor your blood sugar before and after exercise. Here are some other guidelines from Colberg and the American Diabetes Association: Eat a small carbohydrate-containing snack before exercising if your blood glucose is 100 mg/dl or lower. Wait about 10 to 15 minutes before starting your activity. Eat a snack if you plan to exercise for more than 60 minutes, plan to do a more intense workout than usual, or if the weather is warmer or cooler than usual. Always carry a small snack that's high in sugar or carbohydrate. The average 150-pound adult needs 20 grams of carbohydrate for every half-hour of moderate exercise. Some snack choices include sports drinks and gels and easily absorbed carbohydrate sources, such as jelly beans and energy bars. Watch for symptoms of hypoglycemia during exercise. If you feel weak, lightheaded, cold, or clammy, stop and check your blood glucose. If it's low, treat it with a pure source of glucose, such as glucose tablets or gel. Become familiar with the ways different activities affect your blood sugar levels. Measure blood sugar before and after exercise. Keep a written record of what the activity was, how long you did the activity, what you ate, and blood glucose levels before and after. Over time, you'll better understand how activity affects your blood sugar levels and insulin doses. For insulin pump users, lower basal insulin if you're planning more than 90 minutes of activity. Shorter bouts of e Continue reading >>

Helping People With Type 1 Diabetes Exercise Safely – New Findings

Helping People With Type 1 Diabetes Exercise Safely – New Findings

There are more than 3m people in the UK living with diabetes, amounting to 6% of the population. Of those, 10% or about 300,000 have type 1 diabetes, which usually develops during childhood and adolescence – as opposed to type 2, which tends to affect older adults and is more commonly associated with lifestyle and obesity. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys the insulin–producing cells in the pancreas, preventing the body from producing the insulin that it needs to maintain the right level of blood glucose. People with type 1 diabetes are always treated with insulin injections or an insulin pump, without which they would die. The most common treatment is the basal-bolus regimen, which involves injecting a 24-hour-acting insulin once or twice daily to provide background insulin, along with fast-acting insulin injections before meals or snacks. If the insulin dose is not right for the patient, they can have hypoglycaemia (low blood-glucose) or hyperglycaemia (high blood-glucose). For people living with type 1 diabetes, the risk of hypoglycaemia is a day-to-day phenomenon. Symptoms include light headedness, tremors, confusion, unsteadiness, drowsiness and sometimes unconsciousness. It happens quickly, making it one of the most feared complications from diabetes. Hypoglycaemia is an acute emergency which needs immediate treatment with glucose – unlike hyperglycaemia, which can produce symptoms like excessive tiredness and large amounts of urine but only becomes an emergency if it continues for a few days. Both complaints are usually caused by taking too much insulin, increased exercise or not eating enough carbohydrates, so it is essential to strike the right balance between them. The risks of exercise Although we know that a patient’s level of ex Continue reading >>

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