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Excessive Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

In 2010 as many as three million people were estimated to have diabetes in England. The condition can lead to a number of serious health conditions. It has been estimated that Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the condition, costs the UK economy nearly £9 billion every year – a figure which is set to sharply increase in the future. Heavy alcohol consumption is known to contribute to an increased risk of developing some forms of diabetes. Find out more here. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Drinking Could Be Dangerous - Are You In The 'at Risk' Group?

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Drinking Could Be Dangerous - Are You In The 'at Risk' Group?

Regular high alcohol consumption and binge drinking from age 16 is associated with higher glucose concentrations in women’s blood later in life. High glucose levels are an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. A new study has assess alcohol consumption data, starting in adolescence, over a 27-year period in relation to their blood glucose levels taken when they were 43 years of age. In women, total alcohol consumption and binge drinking behaviour over 27 years was significantly associated with higher blood glucose levels. This was independent of BMI, hypertension and smoking status at age 43. This association was not true for men, for whom only BMI and hypertension remained associated with increased blood glucose levels. Dr Karina Nygren, lead author from Umea University, Sweden said: “Our findings show that high alcohol consumption from ages 16 to 43 is associated with higher blood glucose levels in women but not in men. “Because higher blood glucose is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, our data suggest that informing people about the risk of high alcohol consumption at a young age could have positive health impacts further down the line.” Despite the association between alcohol, binge drinking and blood glucose only being significant in women, men still had higher blood glucose levels than women and consumed nearly three times as much alcohol between ages 16 and 43. Previous studies suggest possible mechanisms for the association between alcohol and elevated blood glucose. For example, human studies have shown that ethanol can increase insulin resistance, which in turn leads to accumulation of glucose in the blood. Studies in rats have also shown that binge drinking behaviour alters the rat’s metabolism in a way that negatively affec Continue reading >>

A Look At Alcohol And The Risk Of Diabetes

A Look At Alcohol And The Risk Of Diabetes

Think of type 2 diabetes and you probably think of obesity: and it is true – excess weight is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Diabetes can be a vicious disease. At its worst it can lead to amputations, blindness, organ failure, and early death. But what about alcohol – can alcohol cause diabetes? How Does Diabetes Work? It’s like this: In the body food is turned into sugar. An excess of food, especially sweets, will turn into an excess of sugar. (While alcohol is not a sugar it is a high-glycemic carbohydrate.) This creates an increased demand for insulin in the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body convert food into usable energy. The body’s sensitivity to the hormone is reduced when insulin levels are consistently high and glucose builds up in the blood. This results in a condition called insulin resistance. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can decrease the effectiveness of insulin. For the body that cannot make proper use of this glucose, it will instead build up in the blood rather than moving into the cells where it’s needed. Symptoms can include fatigue, hunger, brain fog, and high blood pressure – and not least of all, weight gain. People who have insulin resistance most often don’t realize it’s a problem until it develops into full blown type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can seriously affect quality of life and reduce life expectancy: A 50 year old with diabetes can lose 8.5 of life compared to a 50 year old without diabetes. What Is the Correlation Between Alcohol and Diabetes? While moderate drinking may not necessarily have harmful effects in the development of diabetes, and in fact can even have protective qualities, heavy drinking can be extremely Continue reading >>

Can Frequent, Moderate Drinking Ward Off Diabetes?

Can Frequent, Moderate Drinking Ward Off Diabetes?

(CNN)It's not every day that medical studies say alcohol could be good for you. People who drink moderately often have a lower risk of developing diabetes than those who never drink, according to a new study published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Men and women who hoist a few glasses three to four days a week have the lowest risks of developing diabetes, Danish researchers found. Compared to people drinking less than one day each week, men who drink frequently had a 27% lower risk while women had a 32% lower risk, the researchers said. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose -- sugar -- levels are high. When we eat, most of our food is turned into glucose to be burned as energy, with a hormone called insulin helping our cells absorb glucose. People who have diabetes either don't make enough insulin or don't use it effectively. As a result, sugar builds up in their blood, leading to health problems. Past studies consistently showed that light to moderate drinking carried a lower risk of diabetes compared to sobriety, while heavy drinking had an equal or greater risk. Though the World Health Organization reports "harmful use of alcohol" contributes to more than 200 diseases and injuries, it also acknowledges that light to moderate drinking may be beneficial with respect to diabetes. Since an important relationship exists between drinking and diabetes, Professor Janne Tolstrup and her colleagues from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark studied the specifics. They began by gathering data from Danish citizens 18 years old or older who completed the Danish Health Examination Survey. The data set included 28,704 men and 41,847 women -- more than 70,000 participants total -- wh Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Substance Abuse

Diabetes And Substance Abuse

The Relationship between Diabetes and Substance Abuse Diabetes and substance abuse are two conditions that can seriously impact health. It is not only in their potential to cause damage that relates these two together. There can also be a more direct relationship between them. Some people may develop diabetes because of excessive alcohol intake. It is also likely that any form of substance abuse will make life worse for the diabetic. Alcohol in particular can be dangerous for anyone trying to manage their diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus refers to a number of conditions that interfere with the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar levels. This is normally kept in check by a hormone called insulin which is produced by the pancreas. With diabetes there is not adequate insulin produced or the cells are not responding as they should to this hormone. If glucose levels in the bloodstream climb too high it can cause a lot of damage to body organs – this is referred to as hyperglycemia. Types of Diabetes Diabetes doesn’t just refer to one disorder but includes: * Type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) occurs because there has been a loss of insulin producing cells in the pancreas. This can lead to a situation where there is little or no insulin being produced. This condition most often first gets diagnosed in childhood, and this is why it is also sometimes referred to as juvenile onset diabetes. Those who have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin shots, or use an insulin pump, in order to control their blood sugar levels. * Type 2 diabetes usually occurs later in life and this is why it is sometimes called adult onset diabetes. With this condition the pancreas is usually able to produce at least some insulin, but the c Continue reading >>

Pancreas – Diabetes

Pancreas – Diabetes

Font Size: | Print By: S. Rennie, LPN Alcohol can cause problems for those with and without diabetes. For those without diabetes, drinking large quantities of alcohol can cause pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas). Pancreatitis, in turn, can hinder insulin secretion, thus causing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and sometimes diabetes.1 Hypoglycemia caused by binge- or excessive alcohol consumption can be very serious and sometimes fatal.2 For those with diabetes who take insulin shots or oral diabetes medication, alcohol presents the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels are abnormally low.3 How it happens: Glucose is a sugar the body produces mostly from dietary carbohydrates and is the main source of energy for all tissues.2,4 After a meal, glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream. The pancreas produces the hormone Insulin, which helps glucose enter the cells where they are used for energy or converted to fat and stored in fat cells. When blood glucose levels drop, glucagon (a hormone produced in the pancreas) sends signals to the liver to break down glycogen and release glucose. Those with diabetes may have impaired glucgon responses, making it more difficult to return glucose levels to normal.2 Alcohol effects: Within five minutes of consuming alcohol, enough has entered the blood to measure. The alcohol is at its highest level 30 to 90 minutes after a drink. Alcohol is metabolized in the liver, and it takes a 150 lb. person around two hours to metabolize one drink. By drinking faster than the liver can metabolize it, the alcohol travels through the bloodstream to other parts of the body.5 Alcohol is a toxin to the body. The liver then works to get rid of it as quickly as possible and will not release any glucose Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

For many people, a glass of alcohol here and there does not pose a problem. However, for those with health conditions, such as diabetes, alcohol can affect blood sugar levels and pose a health risk. Understanding what you are consuming and how alcohol influences blood glucose levels is particularly important for people with diabetes. Alcohol can interfere with blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should sip drinks slowly and not drink on an empty stomach. Alcohol and the body Alcohol is a depressant; it is classed as a "sedative-hypnotic drug" because it depresses the central nervous system. Every organ in the body can be affected by alcohol. Once consumed, it is rapidly absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and enters the bloodstream. In an average person, the liver can breaks down roughly one standard drink of alcohol per hour. Excess alcohol moves throughout the body. The amount not broken down by the liver is removed by the lungs,kidneys, and skin in urine and sweat. How alcohol affects a person's body depends on how much they consume. At low doses, alcohol can act as a stimulant - people may feel happy, or become talkative. Drinking too much alcohol, however, can impair the body. Alcohol and blood sugar levels A person's overall health plays a big role in how they respond to alcohol. People with diabetes or other blood sugar problems must be careful when consuming alcohol. Alcohol consumption can interfere with blood sugar as well as the hormones needed to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Frequent heavy drinkers can wipe out their energy storage in a few hours. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can reduce the overall effectiveness of insulin. This results in high blood sugar levels. Many people with alcoholic liver disease also have either gluc Continue reading >>

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

back to Overview Tips & Tricks We recently held our annual mySugr holiday celebration. What a good opportunity to talk about drinking alcohol with diabetes and the effect on blood sugar, right? Reviewed for accuracy and updated December 18, 2017 — SKJ Party time! You can probably imagine it. Some snacks to nibble on, a live DJ spinning the (digital) wheels of steel, and some tasty adult beverages. In a situation like that, It’s all too easy to get caught up in the atmosphere and not think about your blood sugar. That’s totally natural – who wants to think about diabetes when you’re having a good time? I certainly don’t. But does drinking alcohol affect your diabetes and blood sugar? Is it something to be concerned about? Pay Respect! Here’s the deal. If you don’t pay some attention to alcohol and learn how it interacts with your diabetes, it will stop your party in one way or another, either during the dance-off or perhaps more commonly, hours later when you’re sound asleep and dreaming about your fancy moves. Cruelly, that’s when you’re least expecting it and when you’re at your most vulnerable. Having diabetes is no reason to avoid drinking if it’s something you’d like to do. But you should understand how it works so you can do so safely. I’m not personally a big drinker, but I’ve done some digging and hope to share a few bits of useful information to help keep you safe. We’re all different, but basics are basic… One of the most important things I can share is that we’re all different, especially when it comes to our diabetes. Many people also differ in how they respond to alcohol. So like everything – your mileage may vary. In any case, there’s no harm in talking about some of the basic ways alcohol affects metabolism, and wh Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Diabetes

Alcohol & Diabetes

As a general rule, there is no need to avoid alcohol because you have diabetes. You should not drink alcohol if you: Are pregnant or trying to get pregnant Are breastfeeding Have a personal or family history of drinking problems Are planning to drive or engage in other activities that require attention or skill Are taking certain medications. Ask your pharmacist about your medications. Consider the following questions when deciding what is best for you: Is my diabetes under control? Am I free from health problems that alcohol can make worse such as disease of the pancreas, eye disease, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver problems, nerve damage or stroke? Do I know how to prevent and treat low blood glucose (sugar)? If you answered “no” to any of these questions, you should speak to your diabetes educator or health-care professional before drinking alcohol. If you answered “yes” to all of these questions, it is OK to drink alcohol in moderation. Moderate alcohol intake is limited to two standard drinks/day or less than 10 drinks/week for women; and less than three standard drinks/day or less than 15 drinks/week for men. This recommendation is the same for people without diabetes. Health risks of alcohol use You may have heard that alcohol has certain health benefits. However, any pattern of drinking can be harmful. Proven ways of improving your health include: healthy eating, being active, and being a non-smoker. Diabetes Canada’s Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend that: People using insulin or insulin secretagogues should be aware of delayed hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) that can occur up to 24 hours after drinking alcohol. People with type 1 diabetes should be aware of the risk of morning hypoglycemia if alcohol is consumed two to three hour Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

Alcohol consumption can affect the body in several ways. For individuals who are suffering from diabetes, the complications usually increase with the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Diabetics have to control and keep blood sugar levels at a minimum. But alcohol does not assist in any manner to keep blood sugar levels under control. Alcohol consumption is similar to eating foods with high amounts of sugar. Calories gained by consuming alcohol and high fatty foods are nearly the same. This article will help you understand the relationship between alcohol and diabetes. Diabetes Diabetes is so prevalent in the world today that practically everybody knows what it is. There are two distinctly different types of diabetes – type one and type two. In type one diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin (the hormone which regulates the amount of sugar in the blood). This type of diabetes is common in children, however it can also affect adults. It is also referred to as insulin dependent diabetes. Type two diabetes is more prevalent and it has been estimated that ninety five percent of diabetes sufferers have type two diabetes. In type two diabetes, the body actually produces insulin, however either in inadequate amounts or the insulin secreted by the pancreas is not efficient. It is also referred to as diabetes mellitus. Diabetes and Alcohol Alcohol consumption by diabetics, even in moderate quantities, can result in the increase in blood sugars. Drinks such as beer and sweet wine contain carbohydrates that cause a dramatic increase in the amount of sugar in the blood. Here are a few other ways that alcohol consumption can affect diabetes: 1. Alcohol consumption alters insulin secretion and can affect the way medications are absorbed by the body. 2. While moderate Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

Tweet There is no need for people with diabetes to give up alcohol simply because of their diabetes. Although alcohol does have an effect on blood sugar levels, with a few precautions and careful management, people with diabetes can also enjoy a drink. There are also alcohol substitutes for those who abstain. In fact, diabetes alcohol guidelines are the same as for the general population. Read about alcohol's effect on blood sugar What are the recommended alcohol guidelines for people with diabetes? The guidelines are two units for women and three units for men. However, it is worth being aware how many units a drink contains. In some cases, a glass of wine will constitute two units, and a pint of beer can even reach three units. How much alcohol do drinks usually contain? If you have diabetes and are wondering how much alcohol you should drink, it is worth reading the following list to see how much alcohol is contained in each type of drink. One unit (approximate measure): 1/2 pint of standard strength beer, lager or cider 1 pub shot/optic/measure (50ml) of sherry or vermouth 1 pub shot/optic/measure of spirit (25 ml), eg gin, vodka or whisky. So if I have diabetes I can drink as usual? Not quite. People with diabetes need to be extra careful with alcohol. Alcohol intake significantly increases the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). If your diabetes is already well under control, a moderate amount of alcohol may be fine either before, during or soon after a meal. Even if you have a drink, this may not influence short-term blood glucose levels. However, there are some precautions to be taken care of. What do I need to be careful of when it comes to diabetes and alcohol? Avoid drinking on an empty stomach, as this will quickly increase the amount of alcohol i Continue reading >>

Alcoholism And Diabetes: Exploring The Connection

Alcoholism And Diabetes: Exploring The Connection

According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014, 29 million people in the U.S. (9.3 percent of the population) have diabetes. About 86 million adults have pre-diabetes, a condition that significantly increases their risks of developing diabetes. The onset of diabetes or concerns over the risk of developing the disease prompts many people to examine their food and lifestyle choices. Among the questions that top their minds is “Can I drink if I have diabetes?” According to the American Diabetes Association, most people with diabetes can drink a moderate amount of alcohol if their blood sugar level is well under control. The key here is moderation. Moderate amount of alcohol is known to be beneficial for the heart and can reduce the risk of developing heart disease. However, you should always consult your doctor to find out if alcohol is safe for you. Before delving into the correlation between alcoholism and diabetes, learn more about diabetes. This knowledge will help you understand why doctors and scientists warn against excessive drinking. Diabetes is a life-long condition where either the body (the pancreas) does not produce adequate insulin or the insulin does not work as expected. Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the conversion of glucose in the bloodstream to cellular energy that fuels us. Diabetics have an excess of glucose in the bloodstream. Over time, excessive blood glucose levels damage all the major organs of the body, like the heart, kidneys, and eyes. Unmanaged diabetes can increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, strokes, nerve damage, blindness, and kidney failure. Diabetes: Type I and Type II The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases classifies the types of diabetes. Type I diabetes is the least common Continue reading >>

Drinking And Type 2 Diabetes

Drinking And Type 2 Diabetes

Popping a champagne bottle, clinking glasses for a toast, or sharing a beer with friends are time-honored rituals. If you have type 2 diabetes, does this mean those rituals can no longer be part of your life? Questions to Ask Before Imbibing You should ask yourself these three questions before you consider drinking alcohol: Is your diabetes under control? Do you have any other illnesses that could be made worse by drinking alcohol? Do you know how to manage your blood sugar if it dips too low or rises too high? If your diabetes is not under control; if you have other illnesses affecting your liver, heart, or nerves; or if you don’t know what to do if your blood sugar fluctuates too much, alcohol may cause some significant side effects. Finally, if you didn’t drink alcohol before you were diagnosed with diabetes, you probably shouldn’t start now. Regular drinking can also interfere with good diabetes self-care. A large study of nearly 66,000 patients with diabetes published in April 2013 in the journal Acta Diabetologica found that the more patients drank, the less likely they were to adhere to important self-care behaviors like getting enough exercise, not smoking, eating a healthy diet, and taking their diabetes medications. Your Physician’s Input Is Important Cynthia Herrick, MD, a Washington University endocrinologist with Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, says people with type 2 diabetes should talk with their physician about how often — and how much — they drink. If you’re healthy and your doctor doesn’t see any reason why you can’t drink alcohol, as always, moderation is the key. Robert Ruxin, MD, an endocrinologist in Ridgefield, Connecticut, says moderation means a daily limit of "one alcoholic drink equivalent or less for women and two or l Continue reading >>

Moderate Alcohol Consumption And Diabetes – Benefits Are Found In New Study

Moderate Alcohol Consumption And Diabetes – Benefits Are Found In New Study

There have been several studies that have connected excessive drinking to type 2 diabetes. However, there are no studies that have actually looked at the drinking patterns and frequency and diabetes. Danish researchers have thus tried to understand the connection and explore if moderate alcohol consumption has a beneficial effect on diabetes. This new study was published this week in the journal Diabetologia. This was a cohort study where the participants were followed up for a period of time. The data came from the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007–2008. The participants in the study were 28,704 men and 41,847 women – a total of 76,484. They were followed up for an average of 4.9 years. To look at their alcohol consumption patterns they were given questionnaires to fill. The patterns noted included frequency of alcohol intake, frequency of binge indulgences, consumption of wine, beer and other spirits and their quantities. Average alcohol consumption units were calculated for every person based on these to assess the weekly alcohol intake. Alongside the information of how many of these individuals developed diabetes was obtained from Danish National Diabetes Register. Hazards of developing diabetes and its association with alcohol consumption were calculated using statistical tools and software. Results showed that during the years of follow up of the participants, 859 men and 887 women developed diabetes. The risk of development was lowest with those who reported consumption of 14 drinks/week among men and 9 drinks/week among women compared to people who did not take alcohol at all. The risk of diabetes was significantly lower for those who took three to four drinks a week compared to those who took less than one drink a week. Other factors that may influence Continue reading >>

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