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Excessive Alcohol And Diabetes

Can Alcoholism Cause Diabetes?

Can Alcoholism Cause Diabetes?

According to the Mayo Clinic, excessive alcohol consumption can increase a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. When women consume more than one drink per day, or when men consume more than two drinks per day, the pancreas may become inflamed. When inflammation develops, the pancreas may not be able to secrete insulin. This eventually leads to diabetes. Binge Drinking and Insulin Resistance Alcoholism is a disease that often includes binge drinking. This is the worst type of drinking because it is believed to cause insulin resistance. A study published in the Jan. 30, 2013 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine involved rats who were given alcohol for three days to mimic binge drinking in humans. The control group was fed the same amount of calories. In this study, the rats were tested when there was no more alcohol in their blood. In the group that had been given large amounts of alcohol, higher levels of plasma insulin were found in their bodies. This suggests that the insulin resistance might have caused impaired glucose tolerance. Scientists and doctors acknowledge that levels of high plasma insulin are risk factors that increase the chance of developing type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and stroke. Before this study, it was not known if binge drinking could lead to diabetes. This is likely because binge drinking is often associated with binge eating, said Claudia Lindtner, M.D., author of the study and an Associate Researcher of Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. This study showed that binge drinking can induce insulin resistance independent of how many calories a person eats. Moderation is Key According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics should drink no more th Continue reading >>

Moderate Alcohol Consumption And Diabetes – Benefits Are Found In New Study

Moderate Alcohol Consumption And Diabetes – Benefits Are Found In New Study

There have been several studies that have connected excessive drinking to type 2 diabetes. However, there are no studies that have actually looked at the drinking patterns and frequency and diabetes. Danish researchers have thus tried to understand the connection and explore if moderate alcohol consumption has a beneficial effect on diabetes. This new study was published this week in the journal Diabetologia. This was a cohort study where the participants were followed up for a period of time. The data came from the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007–2008. The participants in the study were 28,704 men and 41,847 women – a total of 76,484. They were followed up for an average of 4.9 years. To look at their alcohol consumption patterns they were given questionnaires to fill. The patterns noted included frequency of alcohol intake, frequency of binge indulgences, consumption of wine, beer and other spirits and their quantities. Average alcohol consumption units were calculated for every person based on these to assess the weekly alcohol intake. Alongside the information of how many of these individuals developed diabetes was obtained from Danish National Diabetes Register. Hazards of developing diabetes and its association with alcohol consumption were calculated using statistical tools and software. Results showed that during the years of follow up of the participants, 859 men and 887 women developed diabetes. The risk of development was lowest with those who reported consumption of 14 drinks/week among men and 9 drinks/week among women compared to people who did not take alcohol at all. The risk of diabetes was significantly lower for those who took three to four drinks a week compared to those who took less than one drink a week. Other factors that may influence Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Diabetes

Alcohol & Diabetes

As a general rule, there is no need to avoid alcohol because you have diabetes. You should not drink alcohol if you: Are pregnant or trying to get pregnant Are breastfeeding Have a personal or family history of drinking problems Are planning to drive or engage in other activities that require attention or skill Are taking certain medications. Ask your pharmacist about your medications. Consider the following questions when deciding what is best for you: Is my diabetes under control? Am I free from health problems that alcohol can make worse such as disease of the pancreas, eye disease, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver problems, nerve damage or stroke? Do I know how to prevent and treat low blood glucose (sugar)? If you answered “no” to any of these questions, you should speak to your diabetes educator or health-care professional before drinking alcohol. If you answered “yes” to all of these questions, it is OK to drink alcohol in moderation. Moderate alcohol intake is limited to two standard drinks/day or less than 10 drinks/week for women; and less than three standard drinks/day or less than 15 drinks/week for men. This recommendation is the same for people without diabetes. Health risks of alcohol use You may have heard that alcohol has certain health benefits. However, any pattern of drinking can be harmful. Proven ways of improving your health include: healthy eating, being active, and being a non-smoker. Diabetes Canada’s Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend that: People using insulin or insulin secretagogues should be aware of delayed hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) that can occur up to 24 hours after drinking alcohol. People with type 1 diabetes should be aware of the risk of morning hypoglycemia if alcohol is consumed two to three hour Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

Tweet There is no need for people with diabetes to give up alcohol simply because of their diabetes. Although alcohol does have an effect on blood sugar levels, with a few precautions and careful management, people with diabetes can also enjoy a drink. There are also alcohol substitutes for those who abstain. In fact, diabetes alcohol guidelines are the same as for the general population. Read about alcohol's effect on blood sugar What are the recommended alcohol guidelines for people with diabetes? The guidelines are two units for women and three units for men. However, it is worth being aware how many units a drink contains. In some cases, a glass of wine will constitute two units, and a pint of beer can even reach three units. How much alcohol do drinks usually contain? If you have diabetes and are wondering how much alcohol you should drink, it is worth reading the following list to see how much alcohol is contained in each type of drink. One unit (approximate measure): 1/2 pint of standard strength beer, lager or cider 1 pub shot/optic/measure (50ml) of sherry or vermouth 1 pub shot/optic/measure of spirit (25 ml), eg gin, vodka or whisky. So if I have diabetes I can drink as usual? Not quite. People with diabetes need to be extra careful with alcohol. Alcohol intake significantly increases the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). If your diabetes is already well under control, a moderate amount of alcohol may be fine either before, during or soon after a meal. Even if you have a drink, this may not influence short-term blood glucose levels. However, there are some precautions to be taken care of. What do I need to be careful of when it comes to diabetes and alcohol? Avoid drinking on an empty stomach, as this will quickly increase the amount of alcohol i Continue reading >>

Can Alcohol Cause Diabetes?

Can Alcohol Cause Diabetes?

Most of us have heard by now that alcohol can have detrimental effects on our health, but did you know that it significantly raises the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes? How is blood sugar regulated? The cells in your body use glucose, a simple sugar, as fuel to survive and function. Normally, the body tries to keep a constant supply of glucose in the blood so that your cells don’t overload while you’re eating and starve when you’re between meals. The body maintains this steady blood-sugar level by storing excess glucose as “glycogen” chains within the liver and muscles. The hypothalamus, a part of the brain involved in regulating survival habits like eating, tells the pancreas what to do based on how much glucose is in your blood stream. When your blood sugar levels are high, the hypothalamus tells the pancreas to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin causes glucose to leave the blood and enter the liver and muscles where it can be turned into glycogen. Conversely, when your blood sugar levels are low, the hypothalamus tells the pancreas to produce a hormone called glucagon. Glucagon causes the breakdown of glycogen so that glucose can leave the liver and muscles and enter the bloodstream where it can be used as cell fuel again. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that alters the body’s ability to use glucose. Type 1 diabetes, otherwise known as insulin-dependent diabetes, occurs when the individual’s body cannot produce insulin. Type 2 Diabetes, otherwise known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes, occurs when the individual’s body can produce insulin, but cannot use or respond to it. In both cases, excess glucose just floats around in the bloodstream instead of getting stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles. Common symptoms of diabetes inc Continue reading >>

Can Frequent, Moderate Drinking Ward Off Diabetes?

Can Frequent, Moderate Drinking Ward Off Diabetes?

(CNN)It's not every day that medical studies say alcohol could be good for you. People who drink moderately often have a lower risk of developing diabetes than those who never drink, according to a new study published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Men and women who hoist a few glasses three to four days a week have the lowest risks of developing diabetes, Danish researchers found. Compared to people drinking less than one day each week, men who drink frequently had a 27% lower risk while women had a 32% lower risk, the researchers said. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose -- sugar -- levels are high. When we eat, most of our food is turned into glucose to be burned as energy, with a hormone called insulin helping our cells absorb glucose. People who have diabetes either don't make enough insulin or don't use it effectively. As a result, sugar builds up in their blood, leading to health problems. Past studies consistently showed that light to moderate drinking carried a lower risk of diabetes compared to sobriety, while heavy drinking had an equal or greater risk. Though the World Health Organization reports "harmful use of alcohol" contributes to more than 200 diseases and injuries, it also acknowledges that light to moderate drinking may be beneficial with respect to diabetes. Since an important relationship exists between drinking and diabetes, Professor Janne Tolstrup and her colleagues from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark studied the specifics. They began by gathering data from Danish citizens 18 years old or older who completed the Danish Health Examination Survey. The data set included 28,704 men and 41,847 women -- more than 70,000 participants total -- wh Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Consult your physician to determine what alcohol consumption limits you, personally, should not exceed. Alcohol is everywhere: at family reunions, picnics, even around sports fields. But people with diabetes need to take precautions when it comes to alcohol consumption. Here are some tips to help you make informed choices. Your body and alcohol The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes in Canada recommends that people with diabetes limit their consumption of alcohol based on the same recommendation for the general public: Women: A maximum of 2 alcoholic drinks per day A maximum of 10 alcoholic drinks per week Men: A maximum of 3 drinks per day A maximum of 15 alcoholic drinks per week One alcoholic drink is the equivalent of: 340 mL (12 oz.) of beer (5% alcohol) 140 mL (5 oz.) of wine vin (red or white) at 12% alcohol 85 mL (3 oz.) of fortified wine (ex.: port) at 20% alcohol 45 mL (1.5 oz.) of spirits at 40% alcohol If you suffer from high blood pressure, have a high triglyceride level in your blood, have liver or neurological problems, it would be better to limit your consumption of alcohol. When in doubt, consult your physician to determine what alcohol consumption limits you, personally, should not exceed. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach! Alcohol has a hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) effect because it prevents the liver from producing sugar when foods don’t supply enough of it. This phenomenon can happen when drinking alcohol on its own, as an aperitif, for example. Drinking alcohol when taking insulin or insulin secretagogue medication* puts you at extra risk of hypoglycemia. A hypoglycemic episode under such conditions can be very serious because your body, while it is metabolizing the Continue reading >>

How Does Alcohol Abuse Affect Diabetes?

How Does Alcohol Abuse Affect Diabetes?

Going out on a limb here, I’m guessing that you are asking about a loved one, as few heavy drinkers would classify themselves as alcohol abusers. But the bottom line is that diabetes and true alcohol abuse do not play well together. There’s a reason I said “true,” because there’s quite a range of real and perceived alcohol abuse. I’ve had wives in my office claiming that their husbands abuse alcohol when in fact the poor guy just has a couple of beers on the weekend. Other times I’ve had patients look me straight in the eye and tell me that they can down a thirty pack a day with “no problem.” (I honestly had no idea that 30-packs even existed before the first time I had that conversation.) But for the purposes of this answer, we’ll assume that the person with diabetes really does abuse booze. First and foremost, alcohol abuse is really hard on the liver. The liver, the largest organ in your body other than your skin, is a multi-tasking organ. It stores sugar, makes digestive juices, and serves as a filter to remove assorted toxins from your blood. Alcohol being one of those toxins. But a great many diabetes medications are also “cleared” by your liver. So taking diabetes meds and abusing alcohol together can over tax your liver. Maybe over tax is too subtle. It could lead to liver failure. And death. Everybody clear on that? So death would be a real problem. Another booze and diabetes problem that can also kill you is that alcohol can cause low blood sugar. If you are taking medications to lower high blood sugars and add alcohol to the mix than you can go really, really low. And that can be really, really bad. These lows often happen downstream, when the drinker is sleeping it off. That’s bad because if a severe low blood sugar hits when you ar Continue reading >>

Drinking And Diabetes: Seven Facts To Know

Drinking And Diabetes: Seven Facts To Know

April is a time for showers, taxes, and the Boston Marathon. It’s also Alcohol Awareness Month. Given this, I thought it would be appropriate to review a few facts about alcohol and how people with diabetes may be affected by its use. 1. Alcohol is not carbohydrate, protein, or fat. Most of us know that calories come from the three main nutrients (called macronutrients) in the food that we eat: carbohydrate (carb), protein, and fat. Carb and protein contain 4 calories per gram, while fat contains 9 calories per gram. These nutrients are also called essential nutrients because we must take them in from food and they serve vital roles in the body. So where does alcohol fall into the mix? Alcohol isn’t an essential nutrient, nor, as I’ve mentioned, is it classified as carb, protein, or fat. But it does contain calories — 7 calories per gram, to be exact. If you’re watching your weight, you need to keep an eye on how much alcohol you drink. Additionally, alcohol contains little, if any, vitamins and minerals, unlike carb, protein, and fat foods. Technically, alcohol is considered to be a drug, as it can have potentially harmful effects. 2. Alcohol is metabolized, or processed, by the liver. If you drink alcohol, your body kicks into gear to metabolize it because, unlike carb, protein, and fat, the body has no way to store alcohol. Once the alcohol hits your stomach, about 20% of it is absorbed into the bloodstream, and the rest enters your intestines where it’s digested. A small amount is excreted through the urine, sweat, skin, and your breath. The liver is a key organ for alcohol metabolism; it detoxifies alcohol through a process called oxidation, oxidizing alcohol at a rate of about 1/4 to 1/3 of an ounce per hour. 3. Alcohol can lower blood sugar levels. Yo Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Regular Alcohol Drinkers Have Lower Risk Of Diabetes, According To A Huge New Study

Regular Alcohol Drinkers Have Lower Risk Of Diabetes, According To A Huge New Study

There's a new checkmark in the 'drinking isn't all bad for you' column. According to a new study that looked at more than 70,000 Danish people, those who drink small to moderate amounts of alcohol on a frequent basis are less likely to develop diabetes than people who don't drink at all. To be clear, these results shouldn't be seen as license or encouragement to drink freely as a health-promoting exercise. But they do provide further evidence that, for some reason, people who drink moderately are less likely to suffer from certain illnesses, including some cardiovascular diseases and type-2 diabetes. Regular drinking and diabetes For the new study, researchers wanted to see how much alcohol consumption was associated with the lowest diabetes risk, and determine whether the type of alcohol or the frequency that people drank mattered. Using data from the Danish Health Examination Survey, they looked at the drinking habits of 28,704 men and 41,847 women, and tracked whether those people developed diabetes within approximately five years. The researchers excluded anyone who already had diabetes, was pregnant at the start of the study, and didn't provide information on their alcohol consumption. The results showed that the study participants least likely to develop diabetes drank 3-4 days a week. For men, those who drank 14 drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the chart on the left shows below. For women, those who drank nine drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the right-hand chart shows. Risk for diabetes in 28,704 men (a) and 41,847 women (b) from the general Danish population according to average weekly alcohol amount. Dotted lines represent 95% confidence intervals. Diabetologia, 2017 As the U-shaped risk curve shows, study participants who didn't drink at all see Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol And Diabetes: Do They Mix?

Drinking Alcohol And Diabetes: Do They Mix?

Most people with diabetes may enjoy alcohol in moderation, but you should always check with your healthcare provider first. Your condition or the medications you are taking could be affected by alcohol consumption. You’ll want to follow these five safety tips: 1. Know if it’s all right for you to drink Check with your doctor or healthcare provider before you choose to drink. We cannot stress this enough. You need to know if your medications or any diabetes-related conditions you have could be seriously affected by alcohol consumption. 2. Stay in control of your blood sugar Make sure your diabetes is well controlled before you drink. Check your blood glucose levels before, during and after you drink to know how you are doing. NEVER drink on and empty stomach. Alcohol consumption can lead to a decrease in your blood sugar. This is because too much alcohol can block production and release of glucose from the liver. And remember that the effects of alcohol can last up to 24 hours so regular monitoring of your blood sugar–and eating a snack even hours after the holiday merriment is over–may be necessary to avoid dangerous lows. RELATED: 5 Suprising Facts About Alcohol (Slideshow) 3. Drink in moderation If your healthcare provider says it’s ok for you to drink, follow the same rules of moderation recommended for all people. Moderation is considered up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men. One drink is equal to: 5 ounces of wine (12 percent alcohol content) a 12-ounce beer (5 percent alcohol content) 1½ ounces of distilled spirits such as vodka or gin (80 proof alcohol) Remember, guidelines are by day – you cannot save up all your drinks for the weekend! 4. Avoid certain types of drinks Alcohol contains calories and has no essential Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

Alcohol consumption can affect the body in several ways. For individuals who are suffering from diabetes, the complications usually increase with the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Diabetics have to control and keep blood sugar levels at a minimum. But alcohol does not assist in any manner to keep blood sugar levels under control. Alcohol consumption is similar to eating foods with high amounts of sugar. Calories gained by consuming alcohol and high fatty foods are nearly the same. This article will help you understand the relationship between alcohol and diabetes. Diabetes Diabetes is so prevalent in the world today that practically everybody knows what it is. There are two distinctly different types of diabetes – type one and type two. In type one diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin (the hormone which regulates the amount of sugar in the blood). This type of diabetes is common in children, however it can also affect adults. It is also referred to as insulin dependent diabetes. Type two diabetes is more prevalent and it has been estimated that ninety five percent of diabetes sufferers have type two diabetes. In type two diabetes, the body actually produces insulin, however either in inadequate amounts or the insulin secreted by the pancreas is not efficient. It is also referred to as diabetes mellitus. Diabetes and Alcohol Alcohol consumption by diabetics, even in moderate quantities, can result in the increase in blood sugars. Drinks such as beer and sweet wine contain carbohydrates that cause a dramatic increase in the amount of sugar in the blood. Here are a few other ways that alcohol consumption can affect diabetes: 1. Alcohol consumption alters insulin secretion and can affect the way medications are absorbed by the body. 2. While moderate Continue reading >>

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