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Etdrs Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scale

Classification Of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Proposed International Clinical Disease Severity Grading Scale For Diabetic Retinopathy And Diabetic Macular Edema

Classification Of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Proposed International Clinical Disease Severity Grading Scale For Diabetic Retinopathy And Diabetic Macular Edema

For questions regarding the content of this activity, contact the accredited provider for this CME/CE activity noted above. For technical assistance, contact [emailprotected] Instructions for Participation and Credit There are no fees for participating in or receiving credit for this online educational activity. For information on applicability and acceptance of continuing education credit for this activity, please consult your professional licensing board. This activity is designed to be completed within the time designated on the title page; physicians should claim only those credits that reflect the time actually spent in the activity. To successfully earn credit, participants must complete the activity online during the valid credit period that is noted on the title page. Follow these steps to earn CME/CE credit: Read the target audience, learning objectives, and author disclosures. Study the educational content online or printed out. Online, choose the best answer to each test question. To receive a certificate, you must receive a passing score as designated at the top of the test. Medscape encourages you to complete the Activity Evaluation to provide feedback for future programming. You may now view or print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. You may print the certificate but you cannot alter it. Credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 5 years; at any point within this time period you can print out the tally as well as the certificates by accessing "Edit Your Profile" at the top of your Medscape homepage. The credit that you receive is based on your user profile. Classification of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Proposed International Clinical Disease Severity Grading Scale for Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema Authors: Author Continue reading >>

Digital Algorithmic Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scoring System (anamerican Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

Digital Algorithmic Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scoring System (anamerican Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

Copyright 2015 by the American OphthalmologicalSociety To develop a new diabetic retinopathy severity scoring system and to determine ifit can monitor changes from baseline as well as identify precise features thathave changed over time. Such a grading system could potentially provide anunderstanding of the impact of treatments utilizing an algorithmic scoringtechnique. The traditional ETDRS grading system was examined and a flow algorithm based onthe grading approach was created. All visual comparative assessment points,relying on identification of features in relation to prior standard photographicimages, were evaluated and quantified. A new grading form was created thatprovided fields that captured all relevant features required for determining theETDRS grading score. A computer software algorithm was developed that examines allentered fields and calculates the appropriate diabetic severity score. This diabetic retinopathy scoring algorithm system was successful in generating aseverity score comparable to traditional methods of grading images. Validationwith traditionally graded images was performed, demonstrating that in a majorityof cases, the severity scores were comparable. The algorithmic grading system wasthen used to analyze images obtained in a large clinical study of diabetic macularedema, resulting in data regarding baseline scoring values, as well as detailedfeatures of the microvasculature that drove the severity scoring results, andchanges seen during the trial. This new algorithmic diabetic severity scoring system provides a means to monitorthe progression or regression of retinopathy with therapeutic intervention as wellas assess the individual microvascular features that may be modified over thecourse of treatment. The structured analysis of grading, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Grading And Classification

Diabetic Retinopathy Grading And Classification

Accurately grading diabetic retinopathy can be a significant challenge for beginning ophthalmology residents. After nervously searching Google in the physicians workroom for the diabetic retinopathy grading scale more often than I care to admit, I have decided to summarize the classification criteria for diabetic retinopathy, at least in a way that makes sense to me. I hope you find this summary helpful. No retinopathy and mild NPDR Proposed Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Level Exam Findings No apparent diabetic retinopathy (No DR) No abnormalities (no microaneurysms) Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Mild NPDR) Microaneurysms ONLY In reality, there is not much difference in risk between diabetic eyes with no retinopathy and those with mild retinopathy. Both have a very low risk of progressing to PDR; in fact, the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) did not examine those with no retinopathy nor mild NPDR. However, the Wisconsin Epidemiological Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR) did include these individuals in its study, and found that the rate of progression to PDR after four years was less than 1% for both young and older patients with no diabetic retinopathy, compared to 4.1% in younger patients with a rare microaneurysm and hemorrhage and even less in older patients with these findings. In other words, a diabetic patient with no retinopathy has a <1% chance of developing PDR and a diabetic patient with a rare MA/DBH has a <5% chance of progressing to PDR in the next four years. All things considered, this is pretty low risk. These patients can be followed every 12 months. Moderate NPDR Proposed Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Level Exam Findings Moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Moderate NPDR) More than just micro aneurysms (wi Continue reading >>

A Severity Scale For Diabetic Macular Edema Developed From Etdrs Data

A Severity Scale For Diabetic Macular Edema Developed From Etdrs Data

A Severity Scale for Diabetic Macular Edema Developed from ETDRS Data 1Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 2Department of Statistics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 1Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 2Department of Statistics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 4Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 5National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. 6Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin Corresponding author: Larry D. Hubbard, University of Wisconsin-Madison, FPRC, Park West 1, Madison, WI 53711-1068; [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. To develop a severity scale for diabetic macular edema (DME) and to assess relationships between severity and duration of DME and visual acuity (VA). From the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), mean baseline VA scores were tabulated for 7422 eyes cross-classified by (1) location of retinal thickening (RT) and its area within 1 disc diameter of the macular center, and (2) degree of RT at the center. Adjacent (row, column, and off-diagonal) cells with the greatest similarity in baseline VA (mean and SD) based on a Gaussian (normal) likelihood were merged. An initial eight-step scale was chosen using the Schwarz criterion (Bayesian information criterion; BIC) and was revised based on clinical judgment to nine steps. Relationships between baseline VA and other photographic and fluoresc Continue reading >>

How Many Steps Of Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy Are Meaningful?the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study Of Diabetic Retinopathy

How Many Steps Of Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy Are Meaningful?the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study Of Diabetic Retinopathy

The association of the number of steps of progression of retinopathy over a 4-year period and the incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy in the subsequent 6-year interval by duration of diabetes at baseline in persons in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy. The association of the number of steps of progression of retinopathy over a 4-year period and the incidence of clinically significant macular edema in the subsequent 6-year interval by duration of diabetes at baseline in persons in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy. The association of specific number of steps of progression of retinopathy over a 4-year period and the incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) or clinically significant macular edema (CSME) in the subsequent 6-year interval in persons in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (P<.0001 for both associations based on the Mantel-Haenszel test of trend). Selected Baseline Characteristics of Participants and Nonparticipants The Relationship of Step-Change in Retinopathy Severity Between Baseline and 4-Year Follow-up and Progression to Proliferative Retinopathy or Clinically Significant Macular Edema by 10-Year Follow-up Continue reading >>

Cpd Modules Available - Luxottica Institute Of Learning

Cpd Modules Available - Luxottica Institute Of Learning

4 CPD in Australia | 1CD in New Zealand | 24 October 2015 This module explores diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy both in the context of the global community and current situation in Australia. A review of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy is covered. Diagnosis, management and treatment of diabetic retinopathy are examined from an evidence-based perspective to understand the best practices. At the completion of this module you will: Understand the epidemiology of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy, including magnitude and risk factors Refresh your knowledge of ocular complications of diabetes mellitus Understand the clinical presentation of diabetic retinopathy and most current classifications of diabetic retinopathy Appreciate the advantages of new imaging technology in detecting and monitoring diabetic retinopathy Understand the evidence for management and treatment of diabetic retinopathy Understand the current diabetic eye disease screening programs globally and in Australia Understand the role of optometry in diabetic eye care Understand the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to care in diabetes mellitus You will be required to complete a multiple choice exam at the end of the module based on evaluating scans from a number of clinical cases. Your responses will be automatically marked by the E-Learning system and a mark instantly returned. Diabetes mellitus is the most common non-communicable disease in the world that results in significant morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular complications, eye and kidney disease and limb amputation. This makes diabetes mellitus the most challenging public health issue of the 21st century as throughout the world it is now reaching epidemic levels. Diabetes mellitus is a major cause or avoidable bl Continue reading >>

[full Text] Optomap Ultrawide Field Imaging Identifies Additional Retinal Abnormal | Opth

[full Text] Optomap Ultrawide Field Imaging Identifies Additional Retinal Abnormal | Opth

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser Liam D Price,1 Stephanie Au,2 N Victor Chong1 1Oxford Eye Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 2University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, Peoples Republic of China Purpose: To compare diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity grading between Optomap ultrawide field scanning laser ophthalmoscope (UWFSLO) 200 images and an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) seven-standard field view. Methods: Optomap UWFSLO images (total: 266) were retrospectively selected for evidence of DR from a database of eye clinic attendees. The Optomap UWFSLO images were graded for DR severity by two masked assessors. An ETDRS seven-field mask was overlaid on the Optomap UWFSLO images, and the DR grade was assessed for the region inside the mask. Any interassessor discrepancies were adjudicated by a senior retinal specialist. Kappa agreement levels were used for statistical analysis. Results: Fifty images (19%) (P<0.001) were assigned a higher DR level in the Optomap UWFSLO view compared to the ETDRS seven-field view, which resulted in 40 images (15%) (P<0.001) receiving a higher DR severity grade. DR severity grades in the ETDRS seven-field view compared with the Optomap UWFSLO view were identical in 85% (226) of the images and within one severity level in 100% (266) of the images. Agreement between the two views was substantial: unweighted was 0.740.04 (95% confidence interval: 0.670.81) and weighted was 0.800.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.740.86). Conclusion: Compared to the ETDRS seven-field view, a significant minority of patients are diagnosed with more severe DR when using the Optomap UWFSLO view. The clinical significance of additional peripheral lesions requires evaluation in future prospective studies using large cohorts. K Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Medical Management On The Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes: The Action To Control Cardiovascular Risk In Diabetes (accord) Eye Study

The Effects Of Medical Management On The Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes: The Action To Control Cardiovascular Risk In Diabetes (accord) Eye Study

N2 - Purpose: To report additional ocular outcomes of intensive treatment of hyperglycemia, blood pressure, and dyslipidemia in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study. Design: Double 22 factorial, multicenter, randomized clinical trials in people with type 2 diabetes who had cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors. In the glycemia trial, targets of intensive and standard treatment were: hemoglobin A1c <6.0% and 7.0% to 7.9%, respectively, and in the blood pressure trial: systolic blood pressures of <120 and <140 mmHg, respectively. The dyslipidemia trial compared fenofibrate plus simvastatin with placebo plus simvastatin. Participants: Of the 3472 ACCORD Eye Study participants enrolled, 2856 had 4-year data (85% of survivors). Methods: Eye examinations and fundus photographs were taken at baseline and year 4. Photographs were graded centrally for retinopathy severity and macular edema using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) methods. Main Outcome Measures: Three or more steps of progression on the ETDRS person scale or treatment of retinopathy with photocoagulation or vitrectomy. Results: As previously reported, there were significant reductions in the primary outcome in the glycemia and dyslipidemia trials, but no significant effect in the blood pressure trial. Results were similar for retinopathy progression by 1, 2, and 4 or more steps on the person scale and for 2 steps on the eye scale. In the subgroup of patients with mild retinopathy at baseline, effect estimates were large (odds ratios, 0.30; P < 0.001), but did not reach nominal significance for participants with no retinopathy or for those with moderate to severe retinopathy at baseline. Conclusions: Slowing of progression of retinopathy by inten Continue reading >>

The Clinical Importance Of Changes In Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Score - Sciencedirect

The Clinical Importance Of Changes In Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Score - Sciencedirect

Volume 124, Issue 5 , May 2017, Pages 596-603 The Clinical Importance of Changes in Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Score Presented at: Retina Society Annual Meeting, September 2016, San Diego, California. Author links open overlay panel Michael S.IpMD1 To investigate the clinical importance of changes in diabetic retinopathy severity score (DRSS) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) treated with intravitreal ranibizumab. Post hoc analysis of the phase III RIDE and RISE studies of ranibizumab for treatment of DME. Four hundred sixty-eight eyes treated with ranibizumab from randomization with gradable DRSS on baseline fundus photographs. Visual and anatomic outcomes were examined in eyes grouped according to DRSS change from baseline to month24. Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) letter score change, proportion of patients with 15 or more Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letter score change, mean contrast sensitivity change, proportion of patients with resolved macular edema, and leakage on fluorescein angiography. Most (56.8%) patients treated with ranibizumab experienced 1-step or more improvement in DRSS from baseline to month 24; 40.0% had no change, and 3.2% experienced DRSS worsening. Patients with DRSS stability or improvement had greater mean BCVA letter score changes (+15.1,+14.2,+11.3, and+11.2 letters for 3-step improvement, 2-step improvement, 1-step improvement, and no DRSS change, respectively) compared with+5.0 letters in patients who had any DRSS worsening. Best-corrected visual acuity letter score gain of 15 letters or more was more common in patients with 2-step or 3-step or more DRSS improvement (51.9% and 44.6%, respectively) compared with those with a 1-step DRSS improvement, no change, or worsening (37.9%, 39.6%, and Continue reading >>

A Severity Scale For Diabetic Macular Edema Developed From Etdrs Data.

A Severity Scale For Diabetic Macular Edema Developed From Etdrs Data.

A severity scale for diabetic macular edema developed from ETDRS data. Author(s): Gangnon RE, Davis MD, Hubbard LD, Aiello LM, Chew EY, Ferris FL 3rd, Fisher MR; Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group. A severity scale for diabetic macular edema developed from ETDRS data. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2008 Nov;49(11):5041-7. Epub 2008 Jun 6. PMID: 18539929 [PubMed indexed for MEDLINE] Journal: Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Volume 49, Issue 11, Nov 2008 PURPOSE To develop a severity scale for diabetic macular edema (DME) and to assess relationships between severity and duration of DME and visual acuity (VA). METHODS From the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), mean baseline VA scores were tabulated for 7422 eyes cross-classified by (1) location of retinal thickening (RT) and its area within 1 disc diameter of the macular center, and (2) degree of RT at the center. Adjacent (row, column, and off-diagonal) cells with the greatest similarity in baseline VA (mean and SD) based on a Gaussian (normal) likelihood were merged. An initial eight-step scale was chosen using the Schwarz criterion (Bayesian information criterion; BIC) and was revised based on clinical judgment to nine steps. Relationships between baseline VA and other photographic and fluorescein angiographic characteristics were examined singly and in combination with the scale. RESULTS Modeling baseline VA as a function of the nine-step scale yielded an R(2) of 38.0%, compared with 38.4% using the full cross-classification of these variables. Addition of each of the other baseline characteristics changed the adjusted R(2) for the combination very little. Between scale levels 1A and 5B mean (SD) VA decreased from 86.8 (5.8) letters to 59.8 (13.6) letters. In a model o Continue reading >>

Classification Of Diabetic Retinopathy And Diabetic Macular Edema

Classification Of Diabetic Retinopathy And Diabetic Macular Edema

Go to: MODIFIED AIRLIE HOUSE CLASSIFICATION In 1968 a group of experts met in Airlie House, Virginia to discuss what was known at the time about DR. An important outcome of that symposium was the development of a standarized classification of DR[10]. This classification was modified and used in the Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS). Briefly, it consisted of comparing stereophotographs in 7 standard photographic fields with the patient’s findings in those same 7 photographic fields[11]. This same classification was modified for use in the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS). It became the gold standard for many years. The modified Airlie House Classification of DR is based on grading of stereophotographs of 7 fields and classifies DR into 13 complex levels ranging from level 10 (absence of retinopathy) to level 85 (severe vitreous hemorrhage or retinal detachment involving the macula)[12]. It is an excellent tool in the research setting but its clinical applicability is limited due to its complexity. Most ophthalmologists do not use this classification in their daily clinical work. The ETDRS introduced the term clinically significant macular edema (CSME). CSME was defined upon slit lamp biomicroscopy as “(1) thickening of the retina at or within 500 μm of the center of the macula; or (2) hard exudate at or within 500 μm of the center of the macula associated with thickening of adjacent retina; or (3) a zone of retinal thickening 1 disc area or larger, any part of which is within 1 disc diameter of the center of the macula”[12]. The ETDRS found that macular photocoagulation was effective in reducing visual loss from CSME. Others have divided diabetic macular edema (DME) into focal and diffuse subtypes[13]. Focal DME was initially defined as edema Continue reading >>

Euretina Official | Official Euretina Website | European Society Of Retina Specialists

Euretina Official | Official Euretina Website | European Society Of Retina Specialists

Co Author(s): : L. Hill C. Quezada Ruiz Z. Haskova P. Schlottmann To explore the effects of ranibizumab on diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) and moderately severe or severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) at baseline who were at the highest risk of progression to proliferative DR. This was a retrospective, post hoc analysis of DR severity data from the RIDE/RISE clinical trials. Analysis focused on patients with moderately severe to severe NPDR at baseline (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study DR Severity Scale [ETDRS-DRSS] level 47/53), who were at the highest risk of progression to proliferative DR. In the randomized phase 3 RIDE (NCT00473382) and RISE (NCT00473330) clinical studies, patients with DR and DME (N=759) received monthly sham or ranibizumab (0.3-mg or 0.5-mg) injections for 24 months. DR severity was graded using ETDRS-DRSS. DR outcomes were evaluated over time in patients with highest-risk NPDR (ETDRS-DRSS 47/53) at baseline. Potential baseline predictors of DR severity improvements with ranibizumab treatment were also examined. At baseline, 33% (n=248) of patients had highest-risk NPDR (ETDRS-DRSS level 47/53) and they were equally distributed among treatment groups. More than 75% of these patients treated with ranibizumab experienced 2-step DR improvements at months 12 and 24 compared with <12% of sham-treated patients. At month 24, <3% of ranibizumab-treated patients experienced 2-step DR worsening compared with 15% of sham-treated patients. Ranibizumab also reduced the incidence of new proliferative events compared with sham at month 24 (5.7% and 9.5% vs 24.4% for ranibizumab 0.3 mg, ranibizumab 0.5 mg, and sham, respectively). Baseline mean central foveal thickness (CFT), best-correc Continue reading >>

Retinal Physician - Diabetic Retinopathy: Halting And Reversing Progression

Retinal Physician - Diabetic Retinopathy: Halting And Reversing Progression

Diabetic Retinopathy: Halting and Reversing Progression By STEPHEN J. SMITH, MD MARGARET A. GREVEN, MD PRITHVI MRUTHYUNJAYA, MD, MH Halting and reversing diabetic retinopathy plays an important role in vision preservation in our patients with diabetes. Part 1 of this series focused on systemic disease control, laser photocoagulation, and surgical and pharmacologic vitreolysis in the treatment of DR. Part 2 of this series will look at the evidence presented over the last decade, showing the markedly positive effects of intravitreal anti-VEGF and steroids on DR progression. As mentioned in part 1 of this three-part series, various methods to assess DR progression and treatment response have been utilized in major clinical trials. A number of the methods utilized in several key anti-VEGF and steroid treatment trials are summarized in the Table. It is worth noting that some measures focus on the structural assessment of progression, including the DR severity score (DRSS), while others consider the severity of DR (nonproliferative DR [NPDR] vs proliferative DR [PDR]), and still others assess indirect measures that may be surrogates for DR progression, including changes in best-corrected visual acuity and structural changes, as assessed by optical coherence tomography. Framing the results of these studies in light of the metrics presented can help clinicians to interpret the value of DR progression as a treatment outcome. Determining the clinical value of changes in DRSS will be the focus of part 3 of this series. Stephen J. Smith, MD, Margaret A. Greven, MD, and Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, MD, MHS, serve on the faculty of the Byers Eye Institute of the Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, CA. None of the authors reports any financial interests in products mentione Continue reading >>

Assessing Diabetic Retinopathy Severity On The Etdrs Scale: Comparison Of 2 Methods | Iovs | Arvo Journals

Assessing Diabetic Retinopathy Severity On The Etdrs Scale: Comparison Of 2 Methods | Iovs | Arvo Journals

ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract| May 2006 Assessing Diabetic Retinopathy Severity on the ETDRS Scale: Comparison of 2 Methods Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI Commercial Relationships J.L. Reimers, None; T. Harding, None; B.A. Esser, None; L.D. Hubbard, None; R.P. Danis, None; L. Lee, None; M.D. Davis, None. Assessing Diabetic Retinopathy Severity on the ETDRS Scale: Comparison of 2 Methods You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or cited in the literature. You can manage this and all other alerts in My Account J.L. Reimers, T. Harding, B.A. Esser, L.D. Hubbard, R.P. Danis, Jr., L.Y. Lee, M.D. Davis; Assessing Diabetic Retinopathy Severity on the ETDRS Scale: Comparison of 2 Methods . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2006;47(13):3854. ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present) Purpose: : To compare an abbreviated method for determining ETDRS diabetic retinopathy severity level with the standard method used in the ETDRS. Methods: : In the standard ETDRS method, a grade for each abnormality considered in the diabetic retinopathy severity scale is recorded separately for each relevant field of the 7standard fields. A computer algorithm then combines these grades to determine the severity level for the eye. In the abbreviated method, the grader (who Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Digital And Film Grading Of Diabetic Retinopathy Severity In The Diabetes Control And Complications Trial/epidemiology Of Diabetes Interventions And Complications Study

Comparison Of Digital And Film Grading Of Diabetic Retinopathy Severity In The Diabetes Control And Complications Trial/epidemiology Of Diabetes Interventions And Complications Study

Cross-tabulation of film and digital gradings of final Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale based on person-level of 310 subjects with gradable dual image types. =0.44, SE=0.03, 95% confidence interval=0.38-0.5; weighted =0.7, SE=0.02, 95% confidence interval=0.65-0.74; weights are 1 for complete agreement, 0.75 for 1-step, 0.5 for 2-step, and 0 for all other disagreement. Cross-tabulation of film and digital gradings of final Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale based on eye level of 310 subjects with gradable dual-image types (n=628). Level 60 (scars of photocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy [DR] or severe nonproliferative DR without residual new vessels) and level 61 (mild retinal new vessels, with or without photocoagulation scars) are shown separately here rather than being pooled (into mild proliferative DR) as they are when change on the scale is calculated. =0.52, SE=0.02, 95% confidence interval=0.47-0.57; weighted =0.74, SE=0.02, 95% confidence interval=0.71-0.78; weights are 1 for complete agreement, 0.75 for 1-step, and 0 for all other disagreement. Clinical Characteristics of the 310 DCCT/EDIC Subjects With Gradable Digital and Film Photographs in the Digital-Film Ancillary Study Reliability of Digital-Film Photography Grading in EDIC (N=310) Logistic Regression of DCCT Treatment Effect on Risk of Any Degree of PDR Based on Film vs Digital Photography at EDIC Years 14 Through 16 Among the Participants Free of PDR at DCCT Closeout After Adjustment for the Other Risk Factors (N=302) Logistic Regression of DCCT Treatment Effect on Risk of Various Retinopathy Categories Based on Film vs Digital Photography at EDIC Years 14 Through 16 Among the Participants Free of Respective Complications at DCCT Closeout After Adjustme Continue reading >>

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