diabetestalk.net

Endocrinologist Role In Diabetes

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

Last fall I didn’t want to go to my endocrinologist because I was worried about the possible results of my latest A1C test. Seemingly 5 pounds heavier than my last visit, I had no interest in being weighed. Although I fully know how important it is to take your blood sugar regularly when you have diabetes, I hadn’t been doing so, and when I did test it, I didn’t like what I saw. There were mornings when I woke to a spike in my glucose or late afternoons when, after skipping lunch, it dropped too low. If only I had exercised more. Or eaten fewer carbs. Or not stressed out about every little thing. I was ashamed that I hadn’t worked harder. How had I fallen so off track? What would my doctor think of me? The Benefits of Seeing an Endocrinologist for Diabetes Of course, endocrinologists who specialize in diabetes care aren’t there to judge patients. Their job is to go over your blood tests, particularly your hemoglobin A1C readings, which tell you the two- to three-month average of your blood sugar level. They’re there to check your feet, to make sure your circulation is healthy; to take your blood pressure; to respond to any problems you may have encountered since the last visit; and to fine-tune your diabetes care. Despite this knowledge, when it comes to my hesitation to visit my doctor, I have a feeling I’m not alone. But no matter about these worries, Eileen Sturner, manager of diabetes and outpatient nutrition at Abington Jefferson Health in Pennsylvania, has one message for her diabetes patients: Keep the appointment. “Whether it's the dietitian, the primary-care physician, or the endocrinologist, we’re all here to help patients achieve good care,” Sturner says. “So even if from the patient’s perspective they are not achieving what they want Continue reading >>

Physician's Role In Diabetes Self-management: Helping Patients To Help Themselves.

Physician's Role In Diabetes Self-management: Helping Patients To Help Themselves.

Diabetes self-management refers to the many tasks in which patients must engage on a regular basis to manage their diabetes (e.g., self-monitoring of blood glucose, medication adjustment, diet, and exercise). This multitude of complex and often interrelated tasks can overwhelm patients and frustrate practitioners. This paper reviews the behavioral science literature on diabetes self-management and offers practical suggestions regarding the application of this information to the busy practices of endocrinologists and others who see patients with diabetes. Three points are emphasized: 1) diabetes self-management is not an "all or none" behavior; patients who have difficulty with one aspect of the regimen may do well with other aspects; 2) diabetes self-management has multiple influences, including patient factors, health care team factors, and social/environmental factors, all of which need to be addressed to assist patients in successfully managing their diabetes; and 3) to have a significant and lasting impact, we need to take a population-based approach involving office systems to provide prevention, monitoring, and reinforcement of self-management behaviors. These activities can be accomplished in feasible, low-cost ways, and examples are provided. Continue reading >>

Family Physician And Endocrinologist Coordination As The Basis For Diabetes Care In Clinical Practice

Family Physician And Endocrinologist Coordination As The Basis For Diabetes Care In Clinical Practice

Family physician and endocrinologist coordination as the basis for diabetes care in clinical practice 1Servicio de Endocrinologa y Nutricin, Hospital Clnico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain 1Servicio de Endocrinologa y Nutricin, Hospital Clnico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain 2Unidad de Formacin e Investigacin de Atencin Primaria, rea 7, Madrid, Spain 3Direccin Mdica, coordinacin atencin primaria-especializada, Hospital Clnico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain Alejandra Duran: [email protected] ; Isabelle Runkle: [email protected] ; Pilar Mata: [email protected] ; Maria P de Miguel: [email protected] ; Sofia Garrido: [email protected] ; Emilio Cervera: [email protected] ; Maria D Fernandez: [email protected] ; Pilar Torres: [email protected] ; Tomas Lillo: [email protected] ; Patricia Martin: [email protected] ; Lucio Cabrerizo: [email protected] ; Nuria Garcia de la Torre: [email protected] ; Jose R Calle: [email protected] ; Jose Ibarra: [email protected] ; Aniceto L Charro: [email protected] ; Alfonso L Calle-Pascual: [email protected] Received 2007 Oct 10; Accepted 2008 Jul 31. Copyright 2008 Duran et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To estimate the proportion of diabetic patients (DPts) with peripheral vascular disease treated at a primary health care site after an endocrinologist-based intervention, who meet ATP III and Steno ta Continue reading >>

Endocrinology And Diabetes

Endocrinology And Diabetes

Endocrinologists and diabetologists (ED) are medical doctors who investigate, diagnose and treat disorders of the endocrine system. This page provides useful information on the nature of the work, the common procedures/interventions, sub-specialties and other roles that may interest you. Nature of the work The main glands of the endocrine system are the adrenal glands, ovaries and testicles, pancreas, pituitary gland, parathyroid glands and thyroid gland. These glands secrete hormones (chemical messengers) into the circulation which have an effect on specific organs of the body. Endocrinology and diabetes is predominantly an outpatient specialty but a number of patients require hospital admission for complex investigations or the management of complications. Furthermore, at least 15% of hospital inpatients have diabetes mellitus or other endocrine conditions. Increasingly, hospital-based specialists manage diabetes patients jointly with colleagues in primary care and training has been adjusted to reflect this. Patients usually have chronic conditions and management is holistic and long term often in a multidisciplinary team fashion. Endocrinologists and diabetologists treat conditions such as: diabetes mellitus thyroid disease endocrine disorders of the reproductive system, such as polycystic ovary syndrome adrenal disease bone and calcium disorders pituitary disease endocrine late effects of cancer treatment Common procedures/interventions These include: programmed investigations for complex endocrine disorders pre and post-operative management of endocrine patients and patients with diabetes management of diabetic and endocrine emergencies such as ketoacidosis and hypercalcaemia management of diabetes and endocrine conditions during pregnancy multidisciplinary working Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Diabetes is a complex disease, and there is a lot more to treating it than just keeping your blood sugar at a healthy level. Thankfully, today many individuals with diabetes have a whole team of skilled professionals to help them manage their illness, including a primary care physician, dietitian, eye doctor, podiatrist, dentist and even a fitness trainer all dedicated to keeping you healthy. According to information from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), it is also important to have an endocrinologist, a doctor who has special training in treating people with diabetes and hormonal disorders, on your care team as well. An endocrinologist is a specially trained doctor who can diagnose and treat diseases that affect your glands, hormones and your endocrine system. The pancreas is part of the endocrine system, and insulin is one of the central hormones the body needs to function properly. Endocrinologists often treat people with diabetes, thyroid disease, metabolic disorders and more. Like other physicians and medical doctors, an endocrinologist is required to finish four years in medical school and complete a three or four year residency. Then, endocrinologists are required to spend two or three more years learning how to diagnose and treat hormone conditions. Overall, an endocrinologist's training typically takes more than 10 years, according to data from The Hormone Foundation. In most cases, your primary care doctor refers you to an endocrinologist if he or she believes you need to see a specialist to help you manage your diabetes. Why see an endocrinologist? Though many people can successfully control their diabetes with their general practitioner's help, there are several cases in which it might be best to see an endocrinologist. The ADA asserts that most peop Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Teamthe Endocrinologist

My Diabetes Teamthe Endocrinologist

Recently, I wrote a piece about two doctors that are on my diabetes team. My family physician and my cardiologist . My family physician (FP), my quarterback, leads my diabetes team. Hes the keeper of all the information coming in from the specialists and is there to support me between those appointments, making judgements with me about what else is needed. The cardiologist looks after my heart and sends my test results back to the FP with recommendations and the plan for me and my heart. Now, it was time to meet the newest member of my team, the doc who will look after my diabetes, the endocrinologist (Endo for short). Up until this point in my life, I havent needed specialists for ongoing care. After a number of attempts to get my blood sugars under control , my FP was clear that he had taken my treatment to the end of his knowledge base. It was time to be referred out. I was pretty nervous but it was obvious it was time to have an Endo involved. When I first met this doctor, what impressed me from the start was how calm he was. This was a nice balance to my NOT calm. He seemed surprised that I had controlled my diabetes with diet and exercise for 8 years. He even repeated it to verify what I had said. We explored what medications had been tried and why I didnt get the response hoped for. I didnt tolerate metformin for long, even when the dose was titrated up very slowly. I had been prescribed other diabetic meds in the past that didnt work either but in this case, it wasnt about a lack of tolerance. Now was the time to be honest with him. I was basically, in my own words, non-compliant with the other couple of meds that had been prescribed. I wasnt getting the response hoped for so I just stopped taking them regularly. When I felt the pangs of guilt, I would take the Continue reading >>

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

There is more to treating diabetes than keeping your blood sugar levels healthy. Most people with diabetes have a health care team to help them manage. Discover why you may need to see an endocrinologist when you have diabetes. People with diabetes typically work with a health care team including a primary care physician, dentist, ophthalmologist, podiatrist, a diabetes nurse educator, fitness trainer and dietitian. Another person who may be part of your health care team is an endocrinologist. An endocrinologist has extra specialized training to diagnose and treat illnesses that affect your endocrine system, hormones and glands. Insulin is a central hormone the body needs to function and your pancreas is part of the endocrine system. Typically an endocrinologist treats people with diabetes, metabolic disorders, growth disorders, thyroid disease and other related conditions. Often your primary care physician will refer you to an endocrinologist if a specialist is required to help assist with your diabetes self-management program. Most people with type 1 diabetes are advised to see an endocrinologist especially when the condition is new and they are still learning. It may be difficult for the primary care physician to prescribe an insulin regime. People with type 2 diabetes may also be referred when they develop complications or have difficulty managing their condition. An endocrinologist can help you manage your diabetes in the best way possible. In certain situations, a general physician might not be completely comfortable caring for diabetes or could lack the resources to educate a patient. Endocrinologists provide patients with essential information about taking care of diabetes. This helps the patient to be well-trained and motivated to participate fully in their own Continue reading >>

Value Of An Endocrinologist

Value Of An Endocrinologist

When you are facing a diagnosis of a hormonal condition, like diabetes or thyroid disease, your doctor may suggest you see an endocrinologist. You may be wondering why you need to see a specialist instead of simply sticking with your primary doctor. Here are some reasons why an endocrinologist will provide the level of support and care that you need with this diagnosis. An Endocrinologist is a True Specialist An endocrinologist is a specialist who has thoroughly studied hormonal conditions and knows the best possible treatments, even when conventional treatments do not work well. Unlike a family doctor or general practitioner, an endocrinologist studies hormones and hormonal diseases in depth, and this specialist will be able to provide the best possible treatment. Most general practitioners have the skills necessary to diagnose and treat basic hormonal conditions, but sometimes the help of a specialist is needed. An Endocrinologist Helps Non-Traditional Patients Some patients have diseases that progress as the textbooks say they should. The standard treatments work and they are able to manage their conditions with oral or injected medication with minimal disruption to their day-to-day living. Other patients find that conventional treatment does not work. They stick with the treatments religiously, but they achieve no results. In these cases, an endocrinologist is necessary to ensure all possible treatment avenues are pursued. Some patients need unique care due to other health conditions that affect their hormonal conditions. They may have a genetic condition, like cystic fibrosis, that affects the way their bodies react to treatments. The traditional-path patients may not see the value of an endocrinologist. Those who are in one of the latter categories, however, do. I Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors

Diabetes Doctors

A number of different healthcare professionals treat diabetes. A good first step is to talk to your primary care doctor about testing if you’re at risk for diabetes or if you begin experiencing symptoms associated with the disease. While you may work with your primary care doctor to manage your diabetes, it’s also possible to rely on another doctor or specialist to monitor your condition. Read on to learn about the different doctors and specialists who can assist in various aspects of diabetes diagnosis and care. Primary care physician Your primary care doctor can monitor you for diabetes at your regular checkups. Your doctor may perform blood tests to check for the disease, depending on your symptoms or risk factors. If you do have diabetes, your doctor may prescribe medication and manage your condition. They may also refer you to a specialist to help monitor your treatment. It’s likely that your primary care doctor will be part of a team of healthcare professionals who will work with you. Endocrinologist Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas gland, which is part of the endocrine system. An endocrinologist is a specialist who diagnoses, treats, and manages pancreatic diseases. People with type 1 diabetes are often under the care of an endocrinologist to help them manage their treatment plan. Sometimes, people with type 2 diabetes may also need an endocrinologist if they have trouble getting their blood glucose levels under control. Eye doctor Many people with diabetes experience complications with their eyes over time. These might include: You must regularly visit an eye doctor, such an optometrist or ophthalmologist, to check for these potentially serious conditions. According to guidelines from the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 diabetes shou Continue reading >>

Endocrinologists And Diabetics

Endocrinologists And Diabetics

Have you been referred to an endocrinologist? If you are a diabetic, an endocrinologist can play an important role on your health care team. This medical specialty focuses on glands and hormones, both of which must be monitored in diabetics. The endocrine system is the physiological system that produces many of the hormones in your body. Hormones travel via the blood and act as messengers throughout the cells in the body. The insulin hormone works to ensure that energy from the food you eat flows through the blood to your muscles, your body fat, and your liver. A person whose body does not produce enough insulin is at risk of developing diabetes. This means that the body can no longer control the levels of sugar in the blood. An endocrinologist is a physician who specializes in treating the endocrine system, hormones, and metabolic disorders that affect the endocrine system. Diabetes is the number one endocrine disease.[1] An endocrinologist utilizes laboratory tests such as blood work and urine tests, physical exams, and other diagnostic methods to diagnose and treat diabetes. They can give advice on proper diet and nutrition, healthy lifestyles, exercise, and other preventative measures for diabetics. Plus, an endocrinologist can prescribe medications like insulin to treat this condition and provide patients with long-term care. If your doctor has referred you to an endocrinologist, it is important to not procrastinate. The majority of diabetics see an endocrinologist when they are having difficulty managing their diabetes. You may also choose to see a specialist if you are having specific symptoms related to your diabetes that include neuropathy, excessive hunger or thirst, or constant urination. All of these symptoms are warning signs that your diabetes may in the Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Diabetes is a disease in which your body is unable to properly use and store glucose (a form of sugar). The specific causes of diabetes depend on the type of diabetes that you're diagnosed with. For more information on diabetes, click on Click here for the diabetes website , the website for the American Diabetes Association. Endocrinology focuses primarily on the endocrine organs, or those organs that may cause a "hormone imbalance". These organs include the pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, ovaries, testes and pancreas. This can be a complicated specialty. There are many glands and hormones in the body, each with their own jobs to do. It is a delicate chemical balance that keeps our bodies running smoothly with very little effort on our part. When the balance is upset, serious diseases and conditions can develop. Endocrinologists can help you manage your diabetes by prescribing insulin and/or medications, offering diet plans and helping you to keep a close watch on your blood glucose levels. Besides diabetes, Endocrinologists also diagnose and treat such issues as: The Benefis Diabetes Education Program offers resources needed to help keep your diabetes under control. In small groups or with individual counseling, you'll learn how to make positive lifestyle changes to live your life well. Recognized by the American Diabetes Association for quality Self-Management Education, this comprehensive program is facilitated by qualified staff dedicated to providing you with the best education and expertise. A series of three educational classes is held on Thursdays from 1-3 p.m. at Benefis Medical Office Building 12, Lower Level Classroom, 2800 11th Avenue South in Great Falls. For more information call (406) 731-8855. Lose weight, feel great and learn to live well for a lifetime! Continue reading >>

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, seeing an endocrinologist is important because they specialize in diabetes and metabolism, and have the latest information on the issues that impact the disease. Watch as endocrinologist Reza Yavari, MD, describes his specialty. An endocrinologist is a physician who specializes in treating diseases of the hormone-producing glands. As insulin is a hormone, diabetes is considered a hormonal disorder. Endocrinologists also treat thyroid disease, pituitary disorders, high or low blood calcium, adrenal problems, and low testosterone or other sex hormone disorders. Some endocrinologists specialize in fertility issues, including the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome, a common condition in women of childbearing age that often coexists with prediabetes. In many areas of the country there is a shortage of endocrinologists, particularly given the rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes. Most people with type 2 diabetes will not need to see an endocrinologist, but many people with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 who have had difficulty managing their blood sugar levels will benefit from seeing someone in this specialty. The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Bob Greene has helped millions of Americans become fit and healthy with his life-changing Best Life plan. Now, for the first time, Oprah's trusted expert on diet and fitness teams up with a leading... Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Endocrinology is a complex study of the various hormones and their actions and disorders in the body. Glands are organs that make hormones. These are substances that help to control activities in the body and have several effects on the metabolism, reproduction, food absorption and utilization, growth and development etc. Hormones also control the way an organism responds to their surroundings and help by providing adequate energy for various functions. The glands that make up the endocrine system include the pineal, hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, thymus, adrenals, pancreas, ovaries and testes. Who is an endocrinologist? An endocrinologist is a specially trained doctor who has a basic training in Internal Medicine as well. Some disorders like low thyroid hormone production or hypothyroidism deals only with an endocrine organ and an endocrinologist alone may detect, diagnose and manage such patients. Yet other disorders may have endocrine as well and other origins like infertility and may need a deeper understanding of medicine on the part of the endocrinologist to identify and work in collaboration with another specialist (a gynaecologist in cases of infertility). What do endocrinologists do? Endocrinologists have the training to diagnose and treat hormone imbalances and problems by helping to restore the normal balance of hormones in the body. The common diseases and disorders of the endocrine system that endocrinologists deal with include diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorders. Diabetes mellitus This is one of the most common conditions seen by endocrinologists. This results due to inadequate insulin hormone secreted by the pancreas leading to excess blood sugar that damages various organs. Endocrinologists treat diabetes with diet and blood sugar red Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Endocrinologists are doctors who specialize in glands and the hormones they make. They deal with metabolism, or all the biochemical processes that make your body work, including how your body changes food into energy and how it grows. They may work with adults or kids. When they specialize in treating children, they're called pediatric endocrinologists. They cover a lot of ground, diagnosing and treating conditions that affect your: Adrenals, glands that sit on top of your kidneys and help to control things like your blood pressure, metabolism, stress response, and sex hormones Bone metabolism, like osteoporosis Cholesterol Hypothalamus, the part of your brain that controls body temperature, hunger, and thirst Pancreas, which makes insulin and other substances for digestion Parathyroids, small glands in your neck that control the calcium in your blood Pituitary, a pea-sized gland at the base of your brain that keeps your hormones balanced Reproductive glands (gonads): ovaries in women, testes in men Thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck that controls your metabolism, energy, and brain growth and development Endocrinologists are licensed internal medicine doctors who have passed an additional certification exam. They go to college for 4 years, then medical school for 4 more years. Afterward, they work in hospitals and clinics as residents for 3 years to get experience treating people. They'll spend another 2 or 3 years training specifically in endocrinology. The whole process usually takes at least 10 years. An endocrinologist can work in: A medical practice with other endocrinologists A group with different kinds of doctors Hospitals You can search for one on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists website. Some don't see patients. They may work i Continue reading >>

How An Endocrinologist Can Help You Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes

How An Endocrinologist Can Help You Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes is a growing problem among the American population and worldwide. In fact, it is estimated that roughly 30 million people have Type 2 Diabetes in the United States alone. This is in part due to the prevalence of obesity in children and the increase of people who live sedentary lifestyles and eat a high amount of processed foods. The good news is that in many cases Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented through proper diet and exercise. Type 2 Diabetes occurs when your body does not use insulin properly, which is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that turns glucose from the food you consume into energy. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for this, but, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and is unable to produce enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels in normal range. As the result, sugar builds up in your blood and in long term will lead to serious complications. Some symptoms of Type 2 diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss, fatigue, recurrent infections and frequent yeast infections. Oftentimes Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed through blood work, but early diabetes can be missed on routine fasting blood work. Some people have a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than others. It is more common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and Asian American/Pacific Islanders as well as the aging population. Other risk factors for Type 2 diabetes include an increased BMI that falls into the obesity range, hypertension, and women with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, those with a family history of diabetes, having autoimmune condition or take steroid on regular basis. Type 2 Diabetes is treated with lifestyle changes, weight loss, exercise, then oral medications ( Continue reading >>

More in diabetes