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Eggo Waffles Diabetes

Waffles | The Decadent Diabetic

Waffles | The Decadent Diabetic

(From store bought waffles? Are you kidding me?) Notes: The only waffles I can find with a fairly low carbohydrate content is EGGO LOW FAT Nutrigrain waffles. Because there is so much butter used to make the syrup, I use SMART BALANCE spread, so as not to increase the cholesterol count too much. I think it all balances out with the fiber of the nuts and fruits. I always keep a container of cinnamon/ granulated sugar substitute on hand. I do 8 Tablespoons of sugar substitute to 1 Tablespoon cinnamon. You should adjust the formula depending on how much cinnamon flavor you like. I often do a final topping of about a tablespoon of lightly sweetened sour cream, but a DANNON LIGHT AND FITvanilla yogurt will work as well. 3 Tbsp. Cinnamon/ granulated sugar mixture 1- cup fresh berries (strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries, alone or in any combination) Vanilla or lightly sweetened sour cream for final topping (optional) Toast the waffles until lightly crisped but not darkened. In a skillet, melt the 4 Tbsp. of butter . Add the nuts and salt. Stir until the nuts are coated with butter. Add the cinnamon/ granulated sugar substitute. Stir to combine. Add the fruit and stir gently until warmed through and juices begin to release. Place waffles on a plate and top with berry and nut mixture. It is perfect just as it is or you can top with DANNON LIGHT AND FITvanilla yogurt or sweetened sour cream. Continue reading >>

Solution For The Diabetic’s Breakfast Dilemma: 7 Low-carb Breakfast Ideas For The Weekend!

Solution For The Diabetic’s Breakfast Dilemma: 7 Low-carb Breakfast Ideas For The Weekend!

We always hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But in so many ways, it is also the hardest meal of the day if you have diabetes. Most people can grab a muffin, juice and coffee and call it good. For many a quick bowl of cereal makes a sturdy meal to start the day. Some find a power bar the answer to a quick breakfast. Others can’t start their morning without a donut or Danish. For those of with diabetes, these choices may be too high in carbohydrates and while starting our morning off with a bang, may shoot our reading into the sky. Truth is that on workdays, I have a slice of low carbohydrate bread, (Sara Lee “delightful” or Arnold Double Fiber) a 4 ounce glass of Trop 50 juice and some really good coffee. But that is what I have time for in the morning. Some mornings, I do switch it up and have some “Cinnamon Sugarless” (I make it in batches, four parts sugar substitute to one part ground cinnamon) toast. While it makes a nice “sweet” change, I find I am hungrier by 10 a.m. than when I have the protein from the cheese. Two other “weekday” choices are maybe a better choice. You can make a crustless breakfast quiche, cut it into four good sized portions and have it for the week. All you have to do it pop it into the toaster oven or microwave and you are good to go. You can take that same mixture and bake it in muffin tins and that wonderful egg (and vegetable?) goodness is ready to go to work with you. Then there is the weekend. Time to splurge and have much more fun. Here are 7 deliciously low-carb breakfasts for the weekend: Greek Yogurt and Berries: Most of the Greek Style yogurts are fairly low in (carbohydrates 11-15 grams for Yoplait, Dannon, and Oikos), especially the vanilla and plain varieties. I like to top these with fr Continue reading >>

Healthy Frozen Waffles - Cooking Light

Healthy Frozen Waffles - Cooking Light

Compared to just a handful of years ago, many more frozen waffles today are made with whole grains. That means they're good sources of fiber, as well as other nutrients. and a much healthier grab-and-go breakfast pick than sugar-sweetened cereal and milk. Plus, there's plenty of other options to top them with besides maple syrup. Span both sweet and savory waffle toppers with nut butters, a melted cheese slice and lightly dressed salad greens, rotisserie chicken, and fresh fruit among many other ideas. To pick the best frozen waffles, we taste tested dozens of brands. Our nutrition editor set strict guidelines for eliminating less-healthy options (see below for Things to Look for on Labels). Any waffles that did not meet these requirements were eliminated. Each waffle was cooked according to individual package directions. Waffles were tasted hot and fresh by panel of Cooking Light editors and staff. Initial favorites were selected, and then the tasting panel ranked each favorite to create this final list of winners. Struggling to cook healthy? We'll help you prep. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter, ThePrep, for inspiration and support for all your meal plan struggles. These sweet waffles are toasty on the outside with a fluffy, pillowy texture on the inside making them good all the way around and our unanimous favorite. Another plus: we think their mild flavor willplease those who like whole grains, as well as those who think they don't. $2.99 for a box of 6, vegan Calories 160; Fat 4.5g (sat 1g); Protein 4g; Carb 28g; Fiber 6g; Sugars 3g; Chol 0mg; Iron 1mg; Sodium 280mg; Calc 20mg Earth's Best Organic Mini Blueberry Waffles Though they were designed as an option for kids and feature Cookie Monster on the packaging, we found that adults like these organic waffles' Continue reading >>

Kellogg's Eggo Nutri-grain Whole Wheat Waffles

Kellogg's Eggo Nutri-grain Whole Wheat Waffles

Kellogg's Eggo Nutri-Grain Whole Wheat Waffles Kellogg's Eggo Nutri-Grain Whole Wheat Waffles Keep frozen. Toast or heat before eating. Heating directions:Keep frozen until ready to use. Toast or heat before eating.Oven: 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees - 450 degrees F.2. Place waffles flat on baking sheet in oven for about 5 minutes or until crispy and hot.Toaster:Heat waffles in toaster at lightest or lowest heat setting. Two toastings may be required to heat completely. Toasting should be supervised:1. Toaster heating capabilities vary. Please refer to manufacturer's instructions. 2. Attend toaster while heating. 3. An adult should supervise heating by children. See nutrition information for sodium content. Make every morning special with warm and Fluffy Eggo Nutri-Grain waffles. Kellogg's, Eggo waffles, made with 8g of whole grain, Nutri-Grain, blueberry, naturally & artificially flavored, 10 waffles. Kellogg's, Eggo waffles, made with 8g of whole grain, Nutri-Grain, made with 8 grams of whole wheat, 10 waffles. Exchange (per serving): 2 carbohydrates, 1 fat, 1 protein. The dietary exchanges are based on the choose your foods: exchange lists for diabetes, 2008 by American Dietetic Association and American Diabetes Association. Visit Kelloggs.com for information on promotions, recipes, products, and FAQs. To check your offer order status go to Kelloggs.com/specialorders. Phone us at 1-800-962-1413. Write to P.O. Box CAMB, Battle Creek, MI 49016-1986. Provide production code on package. Continue reading >>

T1d Question About Waffles - Diabetes

T1d Question About Waffles - Diabetes

Hi everyone, Ive been type 1 for about a year now so Im still figuring a lot of things out. Ive been going low a lot last night and today and the only thing I can think of in common is waffles. I had chicken and waffles last night for dinner and waffles this morning for breakfast (I know what youre thinking but theyre easy to make so sue me). Anyway has anybody else had unpredictable blood sugar after eating eggo waffles? Interesting. Eggo Waffles lower your BS. I'm going to replace my insulin with Eggo's. In all seriousness it's probably not the waffles. A lot of variables contribute to your BS. Stress, Exercise, weight, treatment, insulin quality. Without knowing the full picture it would be hard for us to comment. With that said, take into account the glycemic index of foods you are eating. Pizza is always a tough one for me. It takes forever to fully digest. Pizza is the worst. I am always going a bit low off of Pizza. Pizza messes everything up because the fats from the cheeses slow down the carbohydrate digestion so your insulin peaks before your bg peaks. This causes you to go low. Then generally people (including me) end up high a few hours later because of the low correction, remaining carb digestion, and the fact that part of the fat in the cheese converts itself into glucose. I cover pizza with 2 shots of 50% of my bolus. One as Im sitting down to eat and one 30-45 minutes after the first. This has kept me well in range afterwards. Fats do not convert into glucose. It's metabolically impossible - well, at least, the glycerol backbone of the triglyceride (assuming this is what you're referring to) is probably not going to directly contribute to a glucose rise. It's a fractional part of the molecule. My guess would be that your initial carbohydrate estimate is Continue reading >>

No More Eggo's For Us.

No More Eggo's For Us.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Talk about a morning spike. It was up in the 500's. I let the kids get some frozen waffles yesterday for something new. I knew better but I thought we'd try out a different kind. Wrong move... Never again. Frozen waffles and Go-gurt shoot him sky high. High fructose corn syrup is some nasty stuff. We get the Eggo Whole Grain Blueberry Waffles and put peanut butter and jelly on them and my son doesn't spike too badly from them. Not sure if that would help you at all. It might be the combination of the fat from the peanut butter and the whole grains, which reduce the morning spike. I put apple butter on the eggos. Boz loves them and it's his "least spikey" breakfast. I also give him scrambled eggs with it. Not sure if that has any bearing. We have never had a big problem with the Eggos at all, knock on wood, right! Ross gets ridiculously high from frozen waffles too. Eggos are actually one of our "safe' breakfasts, too. We do get the whole grains. It could have been the combo with the Gogurt - Yogurt drives us up so we minimize it. Eggos are actually one of our "safe' breakfasts, too. We do get the whole grains. It could have been the combo with the Gogurt - Yogurt drives us up so we minimize it. My non D son can't have Gogurt. Makes him mean, aggressive, insane. That's bad bad stuff. Can't say what it might do to blood sugar, but the stuff is evil enough that I'd avoid it. Eggos are actually one of our "safe' breakfasts, too. We do get the whole grains. It could have been the combo with the Gogurt - Yogurt drives us up so we minimize it. Oh, I didn't mean that he had both waffles and gogurt for breakfast. I just meant that gogurt also sends his numbers crazy and i Continue reading >>

Are Waffles A Healthy Food?

Are Waffles A Healthy Food?

Written by Jessica Bruso; Updated April 18, 2018 Waffles shouldn't be more than an occasional indulgence. While any breakfast is better than no breakfast at all, since your body needs fuel after a long night without food, waffles aren't the healthiest option. However, you can fit them into a healthy diet if you eat them only occasionally, choose the right accompaniments and opt for the healthier whole-grain version. At least half of the grains you consume should be whole grains, according to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Since many waffles are made with refined grains, they don't contain a lot of fiber. Consuming highly processed, refined carbohydrates may increase your risk for heart disease more than consuming saturated fat, according to research published in the journal "Nutrients" in 2018. Whole grains and fiber, in contrast, reduce the risk of heart disease. Two 4-inch-square frozen waffles will provide you with 30 grams of carbohydrates but only 1.5 grams of fiber out of the daily value of 25 grams. Consuming too much fat makes weight gain more likely, and consuming high amounts of saturated fat increases your risk for Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and heart disease. Two frozen waffles contain about 6.8 grams of fat, including 1 gram of saturated fat, which is 10 percent of the daily value for total fat and 5 percent of the DV for saturated fat. The typical 7-inch-round homemade waffle is even worse, with 10.6 grams of fat, or 16 percent of the DV, and 2 grams of saturated fat, or 11 percent of the DV. Both frozen and homemade waffles are high in sodium. A serving of two frozen waffles provides 447 milligrams, or 19 percent of the recommended daily limit of 2,300 milligrams, and a 7-inch-round homemade waffle contains 383 milligrams, or 17 percen Continue reading >>

Sweet Success: My Life With Type 2 Diabetes

Sweet Success: My Life With Type 2 Diabetes

I am NOT a doctor, dietician or expert. Do I know everything there is to know about diabetes? Heck no, but I do know what its like to live with it. Lessons learned..and forgotten.then learned again. There is that saying that states old dogs, (ie: those of us with more years under our belts), cant learn new tricks. Even though Ive used that saying before it still bugs me. Of course people of any age can learn new things and improve our situations! We arent stuck in the mud or unable to make changes! Ive certainly learned many new things over the last 6+ years in regards to my health. My question today is: why cant I remember them? Its important to read labels to determine whether or not you can safely add any food to your food plan. I know that! Lower fat can sometimes mean higher carbs, lower carbs can sometimes mean ridiculous amounts of fat. I know that too! You cant always believe claims made on food labels, ie: whole grain or low fat etc. Duh! Ive known that for a long time. If I know so much, then explain to me why I thought that my Eggo Whole Wheat, Low Fat waffles were ok to eat. Today I read an article online at Huffington Post that slapped me upside the head with the news that Eggo Whole Wheat waffles are not actually whole wheat. In fact, whole wheat is the third ingredient listed right behind: water and enriched flour. So basically Ive been eating paste, or maybe an uncooked roux. I cannot fully describe the sadness I felt while reading this news. Heres the thing, I really wanted to be able to eat waffles so I went out in search of a healthy option. I read the nutrition labels of all the frozen waffles and decided on the Eggo Whole Wheat, Low Fat variety. I was pretty happy to find them since I wanted to occasionally splurge and I always use sugar free syrup Continue reading >>

10 Worst Breakfast Foods | One To One Blog

10 Worst Breakfast Foods | One To One Blog

A healthy breakfast includesfiber,proteinandhealthy fatthat gives you energy and makes you feel full.In contrast, an unhealthy breakfast can make you feel sluggish, cause you togain weightand increase your risk of chronic disease. Here are the 10 worst foods you can eat in the morning. Many people thinkbreakfast cerealsare a nutritious choice for children and adults. Cereal packages often include health claims, such as contains whole grains. Alabelmay also suggest the cereal is a good source of nutrients like vitamin A and iron. In reality, these cereals are highly processed and contain only a small amount ofwhole grains. Also, nutrients areartificiallyadded in a process called fortification. One study found that children who consumed a fortified breakfast cereal designed to improve immune function ended up getting sick just as often as children who didnt consume the cereal ( 1 ). Breakfast cereals contain mostly refined (not whole) grains andsugar. In fact, sugar is usually the first or second item in the ingredients list. The higher on the list, the greater the quantity. A 2011 report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) examined some of the most popular breakfast cereals consumed by children. It found that a 1-cup serving often contains more sugar than 3 chocolate chip cookies. Even nutritious cereal choices, such as granola that containoats, are oftenloaded with sugar. A high sugar intake may raise the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other chronic health conditions ( 2 ). Bottom Line:Many breakfast cereals are even higher in sugar than cookies and desserts. Adding whole grains or artificial vitamins and minerals does not make them a healthy choice. Pancakes and waffles are popular choices for weekend breakfasts at home or in restaurants. Bot Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Breakfast Ideas

Diabetes-friendly Breakfast Ideas

You've heard breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and that's especially true when you have type 2 diabetes. A healthy breakfast can help you control your weight and keep your blood sugar stable, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RD, a Chicago-based certified diabetes educator. What should you put on your plate? When you have diabetes, it's key to keep total carbs consistent day to day, get more fiber, choose fewer processed foods, and make heart-healthy choices, Dobbins says. Control Carbs Not going overboard on carbs in the morning can be a challenge, since typical breakfast foods tend to be carb-heavy (think cereal, milk, yogurt, waffles, granola, and fruit). Exactly how many grams of carbohydrates should you aim for? It depends on your calorie needs, but about 30 to 45 grams is generally a safe range at breakfast. Some people may need less, some more. The quality of those carbs also matters. Toss out refined grains, such as white toast and pancakes, and replace them with whole grains, fruit, and low-fat dairy products. Whole grains and fruit will give you extra fiber, which helps control blood sugar, while dairy doubles as a lean protein. Get Enough Protein That can be tricky to do at breakfast, since most of us don't sit down to a chicken breast or block of tofu in the morning. Dobbins has some tips, though. First, home in on main protein sources: egg whites, lean meat (such as Canadian bacon), plain Greek yogurt (which has more protein than regular yogurt), milk, nuts, beans, and reduced-fat cheese. Second, don't forget about the smaller amounts of protein you can get in other foods, like whole-grain breads and vegetables. Spread out the amount you eat throughout the day. It can help you keep a healthy weight. Be sure to make heart-healthy choices. “Diabetes Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas?? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Breakfast Ideas?? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I'm going to puke if I eat scrambled eggs again...I don't like oatmeal though :/ before diagnosis my breakfast has always been cereal, and I do like Cheerios but my numbers aren't good with them, I need some kind of high protein idea for breakfast besides eggs...I don't like most of the "in trend" health stuff like oats and avacado and cottage cheese and the quinoa/chia/whatever seeds, don't do peppers of any kind, and the only nuts I like are cashews :/ im good on lunch and dinners but my pickyness limits me for breakfast I can't do eggs either right now. I have a few pieces of turkey bacon and a whole wheat English muffin and my numbers have been perfect. Chocolate Glucerna (diabetic protein shake) blended with 1/2 banana, almond butter, and ice!! So good and great numbers after! I have been eating whole wheat English muffins with sugar free grape jelly and my numbers have been okay. I even sometimes have a yogurt with fruit and granola with it too and I still test under a 120. I hear you! Eggs are definitely getting old! I usually have them with 2 whole grain waffles with peanut butter! Great numbers! Blend together in an immersion blender or a regular blender, pour into greased pan like pancake batter. I like to add butter and sprinkle some cinnamon (great for numbers!) and sometimes I'll spread peanut/almond butter on them and it gets all melty and yummy. Literally takes 5 min or less and it's delicious! I hate scrambled and prefer hard boiled eggs. Toast with PB, yogurt, protein or granola bars... I'm just starting out but those are some of the things I will be eating. I'm a big fan of eggo waffles right now. As long as I pair them with protein, my numbers don't spike. I'll eat that with peanut butter on them or with sugar free syrup and some string cheese. I als Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Eggo Waffles Other Carbs | Diabetic Connect

Eggo Waffles Other Carbs | Diabetic Connect

I surfed google for an answer and www.askdrsears.com had this explanation: Other carbohydrates: This line reveals the number of grams of complex carbohydrates, not including fiber, but including non-digestible additives, such as stabilizers and thickening agents. Theoretically, this number should reflect the amount of the more nutritious sugars, that is the ones naturally present in the food. Reading between the lines. As a general guide, the greater the discrepancy between "total carbohydrates" and "sugar," on the label, the more nutritious carbohydrates the food contains. This means that the package contains more of the food's natural sugars than added sugars. The closer the number of grams of "sugar" is to the "total carbohydrates" in each serving, the closer the food gets to the junk quality (sort of like junk bonds they are a risky investment). The "total carbs" minus the "sugar" value is particularly helpful in comparing the nutritional value of cereals. For example, a serving of regular All-Bran contains 24 grams of total carbohydrates and 6 grams of sugars, resulting in 18 grams of potentially healthy carbohydrates. A serving of Fruit Loops, on the other hand, contains 28 grams of total carbohydrates, 15 grams of which are sugars - over 50 percent of the total carbohydrates in Fruit Loops are added sweeteners, versus 25 percent in All-Bran. When comparing juice labels, you will notice that even in "100 percent juice" the total carb and the sugar values are the same, since juice is nearly all natural sugar. When you're buying cereal, bread, or crackers, you are looking for complex carbohydrates without a lot of added sugar. There is no line in the "Nutrition Facts" listing for complex carbohydrates, but you can get a rough idea of the amount of healthy carbs in Continue reading >>

Eggo Waffles Fail - Below Seven

Eggo Waffles Fail - Below Seven

Type 1 Diabetic striving to get A1C below 7 Im not much of a morning person, specifically morning food. Sure, I love eggs and pancakes but pancakes with syrup usually have too many carbs and trying to cook eggs every morning takes a lot of effort. I dont really remember what I used to eat growing up besides Fruit Loops or McDonalds egg biscuits but for the last five years, I have been eating Eggos Waffles Fiber Plus with chocolate chips. These are great. They have 31 carbs for two waffles but 9 grams of dietary fiber (so I usually just count these as 22 carbs). I dont like syrup because it usually has way more carbs than I think are worth it but these waffles have yummy chocolate chips in them so I dont even miss syrup. I like these better than any of the other waffles I have tried. Maybe its because of the fiber but I dont feel like I am eating too many carbs when I eat these. However, two weeks ago at the grocery store near me, Kroger, I found out they were discontinued. The following week, I went to a rival grocery store, Martins, to see if they still carried them and they also said they were discontinued but had them while supplies lasted. So I went ahead and bought 5 boxes :-P. I went to the grocery store this week and they were all out :(. The website doesnt list them as discontinued but Im not about to drive to 10 different grocery stores to find them. Im not sure what I am going to do for breakfasts after my 5 boxes run out. What good low-carb breakfasts do you enjoy? Continue reading >>

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

I ate the skinny girl inside of me. I was hungry. You know, dieters like to eat their smoothy in the morning and be done with it. Or maybe that cereal with low fat milk. Great! Good for you! Diebetics are NOT Dieters. And if I have to post till I am blue in my face and call me Smurfette, I am going to get that through to you! Yes YOU. The Diabetic who thinks that if they just lose weight all will be well. That if they just have that small shake for breakfast like those commercials tell you to do..you will be a-ok and skinny in no time! You think your pancreas actually needs to lose weight? Well? Do ya'? Yes, nuts and whole grains like rolled oats are good for you in small portions but unfortunately not when they're tossed with loads of sugar and dried fruit ... 1 cup of lowfat granola with raisins (98g carbs) with 1/2 cup of fat free milk (6g carbs) Yogurt is undeniably a healthy food, but you have to choose the unsweetened, full-fat variety to get the benefits and keep carbs low. And toast and English muffins, even if you opt for whole grain, are high in carbs, so it's always best to eat just half or skip entirely. 1 cup of fat free, fruit flavored yogurt (47g carbs) with 1 whole wheat English muffin (27g) and 1 tbsp fruit preserves (14g) Picture this: A beautiful person sitting in a trendy coffee shop, eating a delicious-looking, oversized, low fat bran muffin and a skim latte, munching on just a little plate of no-fat red grapes. Now, check out the nutrition facts below, and picture that person's blood sugar two hours later! On the surface, a smoothie could be a good thing. Put some fruit and yogurt together and blend it up -- what could be so wrong with that? And there are some relatively good, lower carb smoothie recipes out there, but the vast majority contain hu Continue reading >>

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