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Effects Of Running On Diabetes

Fighting Diabetes By Running

Fighting Diabetes By Running

When you’re a young man, full of ambitions and natural strength you usually don’t care as much about your health as later in your life. So did I. There was a busy career in IT business which gave me the opportunity to travel all around my country, have an irregular time schedule for my meals and, last but not least, gain a lot of weight. There was my family and kids as well, my hobbies and a lot of other duties that kept me away from my personal healthcare. Just a little too long! I’m now 43, and about two years ago I went to the doctor’s for some really persistent kind of flu and the doc took some blood for the analysis. When he called me back to tell me about the results from the lab he gave me the good news about the flu which would go past and the bad news: I was suffering from diabetes mellitus and it seemed as if I already did for some years! The only good thing about it was the fact that I do not already need insulin but can help myself by medication. What followed literally was a marathon of further medical checkups and examinations and in the end I knew that not only the diabetes resulted from my unhealthy lifestyle and my weight, which was up to 125 kg with 1,76m height in my “best” days, but as well high blood pressure and a high heart rate. All of them really bad news which I really didn’t want to hear from the doctors. And in the end I now have to take three different pills every day which don’t cure the disease but just help to reduce the symptoms and future impact. At first I really asked myself whether that could be true. I had no pains at all. Nothing hurt me, no visual results of all of these critical diseases. And I tended to ignore those radical changes you have to make in your life. I knew that the pills wouldn’t heal me. I knew in Continue reading >>

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

If you stick with it, exercise can reduce your need for blood-sugar-lowering drugs.(ISTOCKPHOTO) You may consider exercise a nuisance, a chore, or simply a bore. But if you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you need to look at physical activity in a whole new light. Now it's a tool. Just like taking a drug or altering your diet, exercise can lower blood sugar on its own, even if you don't lose weight. "Exercising is the most underused treatment and it's so, so powerful," said Sharon Movsas, RD, a diabetes nutrition specialist at the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. For most people with diabetes, exercise is a safe and highly recommended way to reduce the risk of complications. However, check with your doctor to make sure you don't have heart problems, nerve damage, or other issues that need special consideration when you are working out. How exercise affects blood sugar In general, blood sugar drops after exercise and is lower for the next 24 to 48 hours, says Movsas. "If I take a blood sugar reading after aqua-aerobics, I usually notice it's down," says David Mair, 79, of Marquette, Mich. When you exercise, your muscles become more sensitive to insulin and absorb more glucose from the blood. However, like many aspects of type 2 diabetes, the response can be highly personal. Exercise can sometimes boost blood sugar. At first, you'll need to test your blood sugar before, after, and sometimes during exercise, to see how your body responds). Exercise also helps lower blood pressurean important benefit since high blood pressure can contribute to heart attacks, strokes, eye problems, kidney failure, and other type 2 diabetes complications. Next Page: Start slow [ pagebreak ]Start slow and work up Even if you know exercise is good Continue reading >>

Long-distance Running: An Investigation Into Its Impact On Human Health

Long-distance Running: An Investigation Into Its Impact On Human Health

Long-Distance Running: An Investigation Into its Impact on Human Health Long-distance running has helped our species survive and evolve. Elements of the human physique, like the Achilles tendon and the length of the human body, make our bodies primed for running. Studies show that running can ease depression and anxiety. It can reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Admittedly, running can cause bone stress injury, bronchospasm, cramps, blisters, and other issues. These physiological and psychological benefits outweigh the health risks that go along with running. Despite the health risk, runnings popularity is still on the rise. Long-distance running has helped people become healthier and happier for millions of years. Long-distance running has shaped and sharpened the brains of human beings for millions of years. Anthropologists have hypothesized that endurance running allowed humans to capture prey, which ultimately supplied them with the energy for mating (Reynolds) 1 . Running is a high intensity and low-cost exercise that enables humans to fully utilize their anatomic structure. However, modern humans have failed to take advantage of their athletic capabilities due to time constraints such as long working hours (Lack of exercise) 2 . This lack of routine physical exercise that humans have adopted has increased the risk for developing health issues such as coronary heart disease (Lee et. al) 3 . Long-distance running is an exercise that has contributed to the evolution of the human anatomical structure and has influenced human physiological and psychological health over time; thus, the exercise possesses significance for human health today. Since the initial presence of the Homo 2 million years ago, humans have maintained certain anatomic features tha Continue reading >>

Can Running Effect Your Blood Sugar Levels

Can Running Effect Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can running effect your blood sugar levels Julia McCoulough Type 1 Well-Known Member Can running effect your blood sugar levels please because I'm supposed to walk or go swimming Well, yeah. But just because running effects blood sugar levels is no reason not to run. So long as you have a good understanding of how running might effect your blood sugar, you have taken reasonable precautions before hand (ie you don't have active insulin on board or you've had a carb snack) and you have a test kit and hypo treatment with you then you're good to go. Julia McCoulough Type 1 Well-Known Member Well, yeah. But just because running effects blood sugar levels is no reason not to run. So long as you have a good understanding of how running might effect your blood sugar, you have taken reasonable precautions before hand (ie you don't have active insulin on board or you've had a carb snack) and you have a test kit and hypo treatment with you then you're good to go. busydiabeticmum I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member Can running effect your blood sugar levels please because I'm supposed to walk or go swimming Exercise will raise your Bgl for a little bit as it triggers your body to release energy into your blood to feed your cells the extra that they need... I would go up to 9s when I exercised but would be in the 6s after eating... my dn said it was normal... however when i went low carb I drained my liver of the glucose so it didn't rise at all in exercise and my food covered only Continue reading >>

Effect Of Exercise (running) On Serum Glucose, Insulin, Glucagon, And Chromium Excretion.

Effect Of Exercise (running) On Serum Glucose, Insulin, Glucagon, And Chromium Excretion.

Effect of exercise (running) on serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, and chromium excretion. Chromium is involved in normal glucose metabolism. To test whether chromium is also associated with the exercise-induced increases in glucose utilization, urinary chromium excretion, serum glucose, insulin, and glucagon of nine male runners (23-46 yr) were evaluated. Blood samples were taken prior to, immediately following, and 2 h after a strenuous 6-mile run. Urine samples were also taken at these times, and total daily urine collections were made the day of the run and the following day. Mean serum glucose for all runners immediately after running was 185 +/- 19 mg/dl compared with 90 +/- 1 mg/dl (mean +/- SE) prior to running. Mean serum glucagon immediately after running was significantly elevated compared with that observed prior to or 2 h after running; serum insulin levels were not altered significantly. Mean urinary chromium concentration was increased nearly five-fold 2 h after running; similar results were obtained when chromium concentration was expressed per mg of creatinine. Total daily urinary Cr excretion was approximately two times higher the day of running compared with the following nonrun day. Daily urinary excretion of sodium, potassium, and calcium were measured to determine if exercise had a general nonspecific effect on renal function; daily urinary excretion of these was not changed by exercise. These data demonstrate that accompanying the exercise-induced changes associated with increased glucose utilization, there is a significant increase in chromium excretion. Continue reading >>

Walking Vs. Running - Diabetes Self-management

Walking Vs. Running - Diabetes Self-management

To walk or to run for exercise? This is most likely not a dilemma that most people face. After all, most Americans get very little exercise , and people who dont even walk very much whether out of habit or because of physical limitations are probably unlikely to suddenly take up running. But if youre in decent physical shape and already have a walking routine, you may be wondering what, if anything, you would gain by switching from walking to running. Two recently published studies help answer this question. The first study , published in April issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, aimed to find out how runners and walkers compare when it comes to weight loss. Based on questionnaires that 15,237 regular walkers and 32,216 runners each completed twice, with six years in between, the study found that walkers tend to expend less than half as much overall energy through exercise as runners do perhaps not a surprising finding. But what may be surprising is that the study also found greater benefits from running than walking when the same amount of energy was expended. As an article on the study at Physicians Briefing notes, both male and female walkers were found to expend less energy than runners through exercise at the beginning of the study, and they were also significantly heavier than runners on average. However, the study tried to overcome these differences by using a standard measure of energy expenditure called metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours when comparing walkers with runners before and after the six-year period. It turned out, though, that even with the same level of energy expended, running translated into better weight control than walking did. Each MET-hour of exercise per day was associated with a greater drop in body-mass ind Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Run Safely With Diabetes

6 Ways To Run Safely With Diabetes

A team of medical professionals offer tips for a healthy run. Running is one of the easiest forms of fitness, but that doesnt mean youre doing it right. Poor technique, misinformation and bad preparation are common, and can lead to long-term injury, especially in people with Type 2 Diabetes. To provide an effective framework for runners with the condition, the medical team at Online Clinic has gathered advice on how to safely manage the condition, without sacrificing your fitness. Here are the top 6 tips for runners with diabetes: If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor before making lifestyle changes that involve your health, and mention that youre a runner. As you become more active, you may need to adjust your prescription so that your body keeps up with your fitness. According to Online Clinic medical adviser Dr. Hilary Jones, Managing Type 2 diabetes is extremely important, and a large part of this is following the right course of treatment. Energy boosting supplements may contain carbohydrates that prevent hypoglycemia, but consuming too much will reverse the caloric burn you get from running. If you need to get that energy before a long-distance run, get it from natural food sources. If you use insulin and see rising and falling blood sugar levels during your workout, change your diet and exercise regimes accordingly. Consider everything about your running strategy; it may be as simple as changing your route. Some people with diabetes are afraid that running could have a negative effect on their blood sugar, but fret not. If you control your diabetes carefully, eat well, and exercise in moderation, then you shouldnt have an increased risk of hypoglycemia. After a good run, insulin sensitivity lasts for about 24 to 72 hours. When it comes to scheduling, its i Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Running Strong With Diabetes On Board

Running Strong With Diabetes On Board

I am not a runner. Back when I was younger, I did play baseball and soccer, both of which pretty much forced my hand (or my feet) to do some fast moving. But as soon as I was old enough and able to make it happen, I traded in those sports shoes for ones that didn't require running -- golf, swimming, biking, and just casual walking around the neighborhood when the mood to be on my feet really strikes. I'm always amazed to see fellow D-peeps embarking on huge treks, and I find myself a little envious of anyone who has the energy, patience, and ability to run successfully while navigating all the blood sugar and D-nuances that come with it -- especially those PWDs who do marathons and half-marathons. Wow! Lately, it seems there's been a wave of PWDs using their running to spread word about life with diabetes, and show that "You Can Do This." Yes, it does seem like everyone is running a marathon or halfie these days and in modern times, it's probably not as big a feat as it once was managing this type of run with diabetes on board. But for those of us who don't run or even think "I can't do this" for some reason, these stories are hugely important and can definitely show the world (and any doubters) that we can do it. Really, it makes me consider standing up right now and jogging in place... maybe. Here's a glimpse at some of the D-folk who've put on their running shoes and been making diabetes history lately: Corporate Lawyer Turned Ambassador of Sweat Robin Arzon is one of the newest faces in this group, as the 32-year-old New York woman was just diagnosed with type 1 about nine months ago and this past Sunday ran the New York City marathon. Her story's pretty remarkable, so much so that the New York Times ran an article about Robin and all she's been through -- getting h Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why Some People With Diabetes Need To Run Or Jog A Bit

3 Reasons Why Some People With Diabetes Need To Run Or Jog A Bit

October 3, 2014 by David Mendosa A new study of more than 55,000 runners is huge good news for most people with diabetes who are too busy to dedicate a lot of time to physical activity. The experts have been telling us for years that working out is good for our health and happiness, but until now nobody knew how little physical activity we really need. Intensity is the key that researchers from Iowa State University, the University of South Carolina, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, and other institutions discovered. They published their new study last week in theJournal of the American College of Cardiology. The abstract of the study, Leisure-Time Running Reduces All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality Risk , is online. D.C. Lee, assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University, is the studys lead author, and his university gave me a copy of the full text at my request. Dr. Lee and his associates used the huge database of the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study , focusing on 55,137 runners. This is probably the largest study of runners ever, and what they found was remarkable: 1. The first of their three major findings was that the runners had a 30 percent lower risk of all-cause and a 45 percent lower risk of heart disease mortality compared with non-runners, no matter how they sliced and diced the numbers. These associations were consistent regardless of sex, age, BMI, health conditions, smoking status, and alcohol consumption, the study reported. These lower risks added up to a three-year greater life expectancy benefit for runners. 2. The second big finding was that even slow running and just running a little was associated with significant benefits in terms of life expectancy. 3. Thirdly, when people ran stayed with a running program, they also l Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Robin Arzon Editor’s Note: Robin Arzon is a part of Beyond Type Run Team, which is sponsored by Medtronic. She is participating in the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon. I’m a Type 1 diabetic. That means my pancreas stopped producing insulin one day and I need insulin to live. It mostly sucks. I was diagnosed as an adult at the age of 32, after a month-long trip to India. I felt really dehydrated, got blood work at my mom’s urging, and boom, I needed insulin forever. There’s no known cause. Approximately 90% of adult diabetics are Type 2, which is generally caused by lifestyle factors such as activity level and food choices. No matter what kind of diabetic you are, I want you to know something: you’re a f*cking bad-*ss. My immediate thought when I was diagnosed was, How can I continue to run ultras? I then remembered my friend Stephen England, who is a very accomplished marathoner, ultrarunner, and fellow Type 1 diabetic (since the age of 14). Knowing he slayed the Leadville Trail 100 Run and other 100-milers was encouraging. I decided I was going to be unstoppable. Running with diabetes hasn’t always been pretty. It’s been trial and error every single day. Within 10 days of my diagnosis, I had all the technology available to assist with diabetes management. I use an OmniPod insulin pump (the white box on my arm or waist you see in photos) and a Dexcom glucose monitor, which alerts me to my blood glucose numbers. I firmly believe technology has kept me racing. I can adjust my insulin ratios for training, especially marathons and 3-4 hour long runs, without needing to inject insulin manually. More knowledge is power. Everyone is different, but I like to reduce my insulin slightly before a long run. I can run with 50-70 percent less insulin during Continue reading >>

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does Science has given you permission to ramp down your workout Take a breather during your next workout: Walking might protect against diabetes more than running does, research from Duke University suggests. In the study, researchers had people with prediabetes a common condition where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the level to count as diabeteswalk briskly or jog 13.8 miles a week for 6 months. They discovered that those in the walking group showed nearly 6 times greater improvement in their glucose tolerancewhich measures how well their cells absorb blood sugarthan the joggers did. More research needs to be done to figure out why exactly walking seems more protective against diabetes than running, says study coauthor Cris A. Slentz, Ph.D. of Duke University. One possibility? When you perform moderate exerciselike walking three milesyour body taps into its stores of fatty acids to fuel it more than it does when you exercise vigorously, like if you jogged the same distance, he says. Thats good news for your diabetes risk: Too much fatty acids can make it harder for your body to process the hormone insulin. And if your body cant use insulin effectively, your cells wont be able to absorb blood sugar from your bloodstream. So your body cranks out more and more insulin to try to compensate. Eventually, you cant produce enough of it to effectively remove the blood sugar from your blood, which triggers prediabetes and diabetes. Related: How Walking Boosts Your Mood At Work Until further research is performed, its not quite clear whether walking affects the bodies of healthy guys in the same way it does for those who are prediabetic. Still, the findings apply to more guys than you may think: More than 1 out Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Still Run?

Can People With Diabetes Still Run?

If you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes and don't know where to start, don't discount running as a great way to manage your health and fitness. Its a little known fact that four million people in the UK currently have diabetes; more than all types of cancer and dementia combined. While people with the condition can lead a perfectly normal life, if not managed properly it can lead to serious health complications. But if youre concerned that diabetes spells the end of high impact sport, think again. With a bit of planning and some careful management running might just transform your life. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 (T1) develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed and the body is unable to produce any insulin. T1 has nothing to do with lifestyle or weight and can develop at any age. Type 2 (T2) diabetes develops when the body doesnt produce enough insulin or it doesnt work properly, so T2requires different management.90 per cent of the people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK have T2. Although people are more likely to develop T2 if they are overweight,genetics, diet and medical history also play a part. While both types need to be carefully managed, many people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes enjoy an active lifestyle and find that running helps to reduce the risk of further complications. After being diagnosed with T1 diabetes 14 years ago Andy Broomhead from Sheffield assumed his marathon dreams were over. It didn't seem possible to be able to do that kind of thing when I had such a complex condition to manage, he explains. I think a lot of people can find it hard to live with diabetes and do exercise because it can be really tricky to combine the two. It can take a lot of work when you're starting out a new exerc Continue reading >>

Running

Running

Tweet Running can be an ideal form of exercise for people with diabetes as it helps improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin. This can be especially useful for people with type 2 diabetes to help combat insulin resistance. The great aspect of running that you don’t have with many sports is control, as running can be a form of exercise tailored to your demands, unless you are specifically entering races. Running can improve your health and help with losing weight in an extremely manageable way for people with diabetes, while providing immense satisfaction and reward in the process. General diabetes and running tips You should always ensure you carry a more than adequate supply of sugar, either in the form of glucose tablets or sugary drinks. Carrying medical identification is also essential if you are running for longer than a 60-minute period, as well as informing a loved one that you are going out for a run as hypoglycemia is always a risk. A running partner, alternatively, would be ideal. Running in the summer months is much more tempting due to the brighter, warmer conditions, but the risk of dehydration can occur during this period. If your blood glucose levels are too high to begin with, dehydration can occur, with runners urged to ensure they are at a stable level, somewhere between 7-10 mmol/l, before setting out. As a reference point for diabetes management, the demands from running are around 50 per cent greater than from cycling, when comparing energy exertion. Running with an insulin pump Running is one form of exercise for which wearing an insulin pump is completely suitable and very helpful as it is unlikely to be knocked and risk the tubing being snagged. Management for people at risk of hypos People at risk of hypos include anyone on insulin, sulphon Continue reading >>

Running With Type 2 Diabetes

Running With Type 2 Diabetes

We love hearing from our readers here at Fuel School, and this week we offer advice for the runner with Type 2 diabetes (we'll tackle Type 1 in a future post). Ask any runner, and they'll tell you that if you want to be a runner, you might have to have to make some adjustments. Adjustments to schedule (those early morning runs require a pre-dawn wake up call), adjustments to diet (room for more nutrients but less room for junk food), and adjustments to overall lifestyle and outlook (which might be just the change you're looking for). But for the runner with diabetes, adjustments may be necessary in meal planning, nutrient timing, medication, and even the run itself in order to maintain stable blood sugar levels before, during, and after activity. If you're overweight or obese and at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes (or already suffer from the disease), one of the best things you can do for your health is to stay active and lose weight. The calorie-burning benefits of running are well worth the effort of putting one foot in front of the other; regular exercise can reduce cardiovascular risk factors, accelerate weight loss efforts, improve body composition, improve insulin sensitivity, and even improve blood glucose control. The general recommendation for all of us is to accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week. If you're a runner with Type 2, keep the following tips in mind to exercise safely and gain health benefits while losing pounds. 1. Before starting any exercise program, check with your doctor first. When you talk to him or her about your health and blood sugar control, be sure to mention you're a runner. Not only will you likely get a pat on the back for your hard work, but you're also sure to get some helpful advice as to whether Continue reading >>

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