diabetestalk.net

Economic Costs Of Diabetes In The U.s. In 2017

Indirect Costs Of Diabetes And Its Impact On The Public Finance: The Case Of Poland

Indirect Costs Of Diabetes And Its Impact On The Public Finance: The Case Of Poland

Background: Growing public and private expenditure on healthcare results i.a. from the spreading of chronic diseases. Diabetes belongs to the most frequent ones, beyond neoplasms and cardiological diseases, and hence generates a significant burden for the public finance in terms of the direct costs. However, the economy suffers also from the indirect cost of diabetes that manifests itself in the loss in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and general government revenues. Methods: This paper aims to measure this indirect cost, both in terms of GDP drop (social perspective) and public revenue drop (public finance perspective), in the case of Poland in 2012–2014. We use a modified human capital approach and unique dataset provided by the Social Security institution in Poland and the Polish Central Statistical Office. Results: Diabetes is a substantial and growing burden for the Polish economy. In the years 2012, 2013 and 2014 the indirect cost (output loss) amounted to 1.85 bn USD, 1.94 bn USD and 2.00 bn USD respectively. Conclusions: Estimated indirect cost of diabetes can be a useful input for health technology analyses of drugs or economic impact assessments of public health programmes. Continue reading >>

Healthcare Costs And Resource Utilization Based On Diabetes And Cardiovascular Risk Factor Profile

Healthcare Costs And Resource Utilization Based On Diabetes And Cardiovascular Risk Factor Profile

Editor's Note: Commentary based on Feldman DI, Valero-Elizondo J, Salami JA, et al. Favorable cardiovascular risk factor profile is associated with lower healthcare expenditure and resource utilization among adults with diabetes mellitus free of established cardiovascular disease: 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Atherosclerosis 2017;258:79-83. Introduction According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the national healthcare expenditure in 2014 was $3 trillion, which was 17.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP) of the United States.1 Moreover, healthcare expenditure has increased considerably over the last decade.2 Of this exorbitant spending on healthcare, a significant portion is spent on diabetes and cardiovascular disease management. More than 23% of the healthcare expenditure is incurred by patients with diabetes and 17% of the national expenditure is attributable to cardiovascular disease management.3,4 Diabetes and cardiovascular disease are not two separate categories from a financial perspective. More than 7.6 million patients with diabetes in the United States have a history of heart disease or stroke, and the healthcare expenditure is exceptionally high in these patients.5 One study demonstrated that 26% of hospital inpatient costs and 14% of outpatient visit costs are attributable to cardiovascular disease in diabetes patients.3 What about patients with diabetes and a high cardiovascular disease risk? It seems intuitive that patients with diabetes and a poor cardiovascular risk factor (CRF) profile would use more healthcare resources and have high healthcare costs. Surprisingly, there has been a paucity of research investigating the financial aspect and resource utilization in this group of patients. Study Highlights In th Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

The Economic Costs Of Diabetes: Is It Time For A New Treatment Paradigm?

The Economic Costs Of Diabetes: Is It Time For A New Treatment Paradigm?

In a series of rigorous and exhaustive descriptive cost analyses conducted over the past decade, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has documented an inexorable increase in the cost of diabetes in the U.S. and its detrimental impact on productivity (1–3). For the 2012 study, the ADA estimated that there were 22.3 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes (3). These patients incurred $306 billion in direct medical costs, more than 1 of 5 dollars spent on medical care in the U.S. (3). The direct medical costs attributed to diabetes, that is, the costs of medical care for people with diabetes in excess of those that would be expected in the absence of diabetes, were $176 billion or approximately 1 of 8 dollars spent on medical care in the U.S. (3). Americans with diagnosed diabetes have annual medical expenditures that are $7,900 or approximately 2.3 times higher than they would be in the absence of diabetes ($13,700 vs. $5,800) (3). Americans with diabetes also incur $69 billion in costs related to absenteeism, reduced productivity while at work or at home, diabetes-related disability, and premature mortality (3). The increasing economic burden of diabetes is due in large part to the increase in the number of people with diagnosed diabetes. The estimated number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes increased from 12.1 million in 2002 to 17.5 million in 2007 to 22.3 million today (1–3). The increased frequency of chronic complications, particularly cardiovascular and renal disease, changing health care practices, and the wider application of new and expensive technologies and treatments have also contributed to the increasing cost of diabetes. Whatever the causes, diabetes is a major burden to the U.S. health care system and to society. One of the major limitations Continue reading >>

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases. An estimated 23.1 million people in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of more than $245 billion per year.1,2 The CDC estimates that another 7.2 million people have diabetes but remain undiagnosed, while another 84.1 million adults 18 years and older have prediabetes.1 The highest rates of diabetes are found among minority populations and older Americans; however, across the United States, the overall prevalence continues to increase as overweight and obesity rates rise.3 Individuals with diabetes are at greater risk than other similar adults for many common problems, including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, depression, pain, polypharmacy, and functional disability.4 Diabetes remains the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults in the United States, and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. Annual updates on the impact of diabetes on the health of the U.S. population are available from the CDC National Diabetes Statistics Report . Despite significant advances in therapy over the past several years, diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Intensive treatment of glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels in individuals with diabetes substantially reduces the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. However, under current models of care, many individuals with diabetes are not achieving the targets for optimal care recommended by clinical experts. In the most recent reports from the National Committee for Quality Assurance on health maintenance organizations (HMOs), 31 percent of patients continue to have an A1C greater than 9 percent, while 35 percent have blood pressure of ≥140/90 mm Hg.5 This gap between curr Continue reading >>

What Diabetes Costs You, Even If You Don't Have The Disease

What Diabetes Costs You, Even If You Don't Have The Disease

Diabetes is an expensive disease to treat, costing the United States $244 billion in 2012, according to an analysis of the disease's economic burden. When the loss of productivity due to illness and disability is added in, the bill comes to $322 billion, or $1,000 a year for each American, including those without diabetes. That's 48 percent higher than the same benchmark in 2007; not a healthy trend. The increase is being driven by a growing and aging population, the report finds, as well as more common risk factors like obesity, and higher medical costs. For a person diagnosed with diabetes, the average economic burden was $10,970 a year. Caring for a pregnant woman with gestational diabetes cost $5,800 a year. Undiagnosed diabetes costs $4,030 a case, and prediabetes, or having abnormal blood sugar that doesn't met the diagnostic criteria for diabetes, $510. Those last two reflect the fact that people with undiagnosed diabetes or elevated glucose tend to go to the doctor more often. Costs were generally higher in older people, not surprising since it can take years for the disease's more devastating complications, like heart attacks, blindness and nerve damage, to develop. About 29 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 8 million of them haven't yet been diagnosed. Another 86 million, or 37 percent of adults, have prediabetes, which is more common as people age. And though the symptoms of gestational diabetes usually recede when a woman gives birth, both she and her child are at higher risk for Type 2 diabetes. The researchers, at the IHS Life Sciences economic consulting group, combed data from multiple sources, including hospital discharges, private insurers and Medicare to come up with the tren Continue reading >>

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

How many adults in Minnesota have diabetes? 2015, 7.6% of Minnesota adults (about 320,000)1 had been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Around 18,000 new cases are diagnosed in Minnesota each year (2010)1 Around 1 in 4 people with diabetes do not know that they have the disease2. For information about diabetes in the US, please read the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017. Are there disparities in diabetes rates in Minnesota? Disparities happen when the health of a group of people are negatively affected by factors like how much money they earn, their race or ethnicity, or where they live. In Minnesota, we currently collect data specific to two of these factors. Education: In 2015, about 5.4 percent1* of adults who have a college degree report having diabetes compared with 8.5 percent1* of adults who do not. Income: Health survey data from 2013 through 2015 show that self-reported diabetes rates are higher for people living in households that earn lower incomes1*. How is Minnesota monitoring diabetes management? Healthcare providers measure five diabetes goals to monitor how well a patient’s diabetes is controlled. These goals are influenced by a number of different factors: individual factors, community-level factors, and healthcare-related factors. This information is reported as the Optimal Diabetes Care measure. Overall in Minnesota, 53 percent of adults met all five diabetes goals3. There are disparities in the percentage of people who meet all five diabetes goals. We show some of the disparities observed in 2014 below: Race: 31 percent of American Indian or Alaska Native meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared to 59 percent of Asian adults3. Ethnicity: 46 percent of Hispanic or Latino adults meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared Continue reading >>

Cost Of Diabetes

Cost Of Diabetes

According to the CDC, the estimated diabetes cost in the United State in 2007 was $116 billion. Indirect costs which include disability, work loss and premature death were $58 billion. New research released by the American Diabetes Association in 2013 estimates that the total costs of diagnosed diabetes have risen to $245 billion ($176 billion direct medical costs and $69 billion in reduced productivity), which represents a 41% increase in cost since 2007. During 2012, the total costs for diabetes care in Georgia were approximately $7.6 billion. About $5.5 billion of direct medical costs were accumulated. Indirect cost Georgians about $2.2 billion. People with diabetes on average pay 2.3 times more in medical expenses than someone not living with diabetes. Sources: American Diabetes Association; Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care March 6, 2013. Published online before print March 6, 2013, doi: 10.2337/dc12-2625 Continue reading >>

Economic Impact Of And Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes

Economic Impact Of And Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes

Supplements > Utilizing Advances in Diabetes and Targeting Medication Adherence to Enhance Clinical Outcomes and M Diabetes and its various comorbidities are responsible for a substantial societal financial burden. Healthcare and managed care providers must take responsibility for and address the high healthcare costs attributed to diabetes care. They can work together to improve diabetes-related patient care and reduce costs. Newer therapeutic agents and those used as combination therapy may decrease direct costs by improving glycemic control and preventing negative outcomes associated with diabetes comorbidities. Additional diabetes education, increased time to review medication adherence and diabetes monitoring, and having affordable care are all necessary to improve the care of individuals with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes continues to increase as more Americans live longer and the prevalence of obesity increases. As the prevalence and the associated costs of diabetes care increase, so does the national burden of this disease. Notably, of the 30.3 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes in 2015, an estimated 7.3 million were undiagnosed, despite the wide variety of agents currently available for the treatment and management of this disease.1 Several older diabetes therapies are guideline-supported, first-line options typically covered by prescription insurance with a low patient co-pay. However, there is still a huge, unmet need to appropriately use these agents for optimal patient care. Newer therapeutic agents may increase the number of patients achieving glycemic goals, which should reduce diabetes-related complications and thereby reduce the direct and indirect costs of care. Economic Burden and Impact of Diabetes The cost of treating diabetes in the U Continue reading >>

Overcoming The Challenges In Implementing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Prevention Programs Can Decrease The Burden On Healthcare Costs In The United States

Overcoming The Challenges In Implementing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Prevention Programs Can Decrease The Burden On Healthcare Costs In The United States

Copyright © 2017 Kritika Subramanian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Linked References CDC: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Working to Reverse the US epidemic, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division of Diabetes Translation, Atlanta, GA, USA, 2016. J. S. Yudkin and V. M. Montori, “The epidemic of pre-diabetes: the medicine and the politics,” BMJ, vol. 349, no. 24, pp. g4485–g4485, 2014. View at Google Scholar T. M. Dall, W. Yang, P. Halder et al., “The economic burden of elevated blood glucose levels in 2012: diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes,” Diabetes Care, vol. 37, no. 12, pp. 3172–3179, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus H. Wickham, Ggplot2: Elegant Graphics for Data Analysis, Springer, New York, 2009. R. Morrow, L. Ferretti, C. Norwood et al., “Improving the reach of the National Diabetes Prevention Program within a health disparities population: a Bronx New York pilot project crossing health- and community-based sectors,” The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 300–306, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus R. R. Bian, G. A. Piatt, A. Sen et al., “The effect of technology-mediated diabetes prevention interventions on weight: a meta-analysis,” Journal of Medical Internet Research, vol. 19, no. 3, article e76, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar P. W. Vermunt, I. E. Milder, F. Continue reading >>

The Global Economic Burden Of Diabetes In Adults Aged 20–79 Years: A Cost-of-illness Study

The Global Economic Burden Of Diabetes In Adults Aged 20–79 Years: A Cost-of-illness Study

Summary Differences in methods and data used in past studies have limited comparisons of the cost of illness of diabetes across countries. We estimate the full global economic burden of diabetes in adults aged 20–79 years in 2015, using a unified framework across all countries. Our objective was to highlight patterns of diabetes-associated costs as well as to identify the need for further research in low-income regions. Epidemiological and economic data for 184 countries were used to estimate the global economic burden of diabetes, regardless of diabetes type. Direct costs were derived using a top-down approach based on WHO general health expenditure figures and prevalence data from the 2015 International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas. Indirect costs were assessed using a human-capital approach, including diabetes-associated morbidity and premature mortality. We estimate the global cost of diabetes for 2015 was US$1·31 trillion (95% CI 1·28–1·36) or 1·8% (95% CI 1·8–1·9) of global gross domestic product (GDP). Notably, indirect costs accounted for 34·7% (95% CI 34·7–35·0) of the total burden, although substantial variations existed both in the share and the composition of indirect costs across countries. North America was the most affected region relative to GDP and also the largest contributor to global absolute costs. However, on average, the economic burden as percentage of GDP was larger in middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Our results suggest a substantial global economic burden of diabetes. Although limited data were available for low-income and middle-income countries, our findings suggest that large diabetes-associated costs are not only a problem in high-income settings but also affect poorer world regions. This articl Continue reading >>

Cost Of Diabetes Vs Other Diseases – In The Us And Globally

Cost Of Diabetes Vs Other Diseases – In The Us And Globally

What is the cost of diabetes in and within the US? Diabetes has affected approximately 29 million adults and children in the United States. That number does not include the whopping 86 million people who currently have prediabetes and are at a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The most shocking part of all this is that most of the population with prediabetes are not even aware that they have it. These numbers are only expected to grow in the upcoming years if we do not do take any preventive measures against it. According to the leading diabetes website, the American Diabetes Association, the cost associated with diagnosed diabetes was $245 billion in 2012 compared to $174 billion in 2007. That is a 41% increase in just a period of five years. Out of the $245 billion, $176 billion were the direct medical costs of diabetes. The breakdown of the medical expenditures are the following: Hospital inpatient care Prescription medications that help in treating the complications of diabetes Doctor visits Nurses and staying in the hospital Diabetes supplies The costs of medical spending are 2.3 higher in people diagnosed with diabetes than those who do not have diabetes. More than $1 out of $5 of heath care money in the United states is due to diabetes. The price of insulin has increased 3 times between 2002 and 2013. While diabetes is taking the nation by storm, there are other medical conditions that are also draining our pockets. I advise reading the following: We want to look specifically at the numbers and compare them to the cost of diabetes. The comparison will give us a good look at where the future of medical burden is heading and where diabetes sits amongst them all. Cost of other diseases and conditions Let us look at the costs associated with the other top medi Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes In The U.s.: Economic And Well-being Impact

The Cost Of Diabetes In The U.s.: Economic And Well-being Impact

IN HONOR OF WORLD DIABETES DAY AND NATIONAL DIABETES AWARENESS MONTH According to the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index™, the national prevalence of diabetes increased from 10.6% in 2008 to 11.5% for the first nine months of 2017. This increase has had a direct impact on health care costs and health outcomes. If the diabetes rate had remained at its 2008 level, approximately 2.3 million fewer U.S. adults would have the disease today, and healthcare costs due to diabetes would be an estimated $19.2 billion less than current levels. Costs to employers are significant with more than $20 billion annually in lost productivity, stemming from 57 million additional unplanned missed workdays by workers with diabetes. Further, the residents of the U.S. communities with the highest prevalence of diabetes have higher rates of obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart attack and depression and are less likely to engage in healthy behaviors than residents in the lowest prevalence communities. This Gallup and Sharecare research also examines diabetes and its relationship to key well-being and productivity outcomes. It also addresses how health systems are leveraging best practices to expand diabetes management both within the hospital setting and out to the communities they serve. To learn more, click here The Cost of Diabetes in the U.S.: Economic and Well-Being Impact. Continue reading >>

The True Cost Of Diabetes And Preventing It

The True Cost Of Diabetes And Preventing It

From our publisher, Steve Freed, comes this thought-provoking discussion of how better diabetes control can impact cost, quality of life and mortality… Epidemiological study cohorts have shown a gradual increase in the worldwide incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Based on the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014, 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes aged 20 years or older (12.3% of the adult population), and 1 in 4 do not know it. This number has increased from 26 million in 2010. In 2012 alone, 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with diabetes. Eighty-six million people aged 20 years and older have pre-diabetes, and if no precautions or actions are taken, 15-30% of people with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Diabetes and its related complications account for $245 billion in total medical costs to include lost work and wages. This number is up from the reported $174 billion in 2010. In addition, over $500 billion of an estimated $3 trillion spent on healthcare last year was spent on conditions related to three chronic diseases: diabetes, heart disease and obesity. In the United States, the number of Emergency Department visits with diabetes as any-listed diagnosis increased from 9,464,000 in 2006 to 11,492,000 in 2009. Based on studies the average lifetime cost of caring for a type 2 diabetic patient is approximately $85,200 and can range from $55,000 to $130,000. Studies have shown that better control of diabetes can reduce cost, increase quality of life, and decrease mortality rate. One study showed that just by reducing A1c by 1% to 1.5%, type 2 diabetic patients can cut costs to $1,717 per target patient over 1 year. Prevention efforts nationwide are very crucial right now to combat serious healt Continue reading >>

Cost Of Diabetes Hits 825 Billion Dollars A Year

Cost Of Diabetes Hits 825 Billion Dollars A Year

Number of adults with diabetes reaches 422 million worldwide Boston, MA – The global cost of diabetes is now 825 billion dollars per year, according to the largest ever study of diabetes levels across the world. The research, which was led by scientists from Imperial College London, and involved Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the World Health Organization, and nearly 500 researchers across the globe, incorporated data from 4.4 million adults in most of the world’s countries. The research team has also created interactive maps and other visuals that show the data for each country, and how they compare to each other. The study, published in the journal The Lancet, compared diabetes levels among adult men and women from 1980 to 2014. Diabetes results in a person being unable to regulate levels of sugar in their blood, and increases the risk of heart and kidney disease, vision loss, and amputations. The team adjusted their results to account for diabetes becoming more common as a person ages and for some countries having older populations. Using age-adjusted figures, they found that in the last 35 years, global diabetes among men has more than doubled—from 4.3% in 1980 to 9% in 2014—after adjusting for the effect of aging. Meanwhile diabetes among women has risen from 5% in 1980 to 7.9% in 2014. This rise translates as 422 million adults in the world with diabetes in 2014—which has nearly quadrupled since 1980 (108 million). The study follows previous work by the same Wellcome Trust-funded team that studied global obesity levels and published in The Lancet last week. The data also revealed that the age-adjusted levels of diabetes in 2014 were lowest in some countries in northwestern Europe, where around 4% of women and 6% of men have diabetes. The prev Continue reading >>

More in diabetes