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Eating Schedule For Diabetics

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, excess weight may make it harder to control your blood sugar levels and may increase your risk for some complications. Losing weight can be extra challenging for people with diabetes. Eating healthfully while you try to reduce weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, choosing the wrong diet could harm your health. Weight loss pills and starvation diets should be avoided, but there are many popular diets that may be beneficial. Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? If you have diabetes, you should focus on eating lean protein, high-fiber, less processed carbs, fruits, and vegetables, low-fat dairy, and healthy vegetable-based fats such as avocado, nuts, canola oil, or olive oil. You should also manage your carbohydrate intake. Have your doctor or dietitian provide you with a target carb number for meals and snacks. Generally, women should aim for about 45 grams of carb per meal while men should aim for 60. Ideally, these would come from complex carbs, fruits, and vegetables. The American Diabetes Association offers a comprehensive list of the best foods for those with diabetes. Their recommendations include: Protein Fruits and vegetables Dairy Grains beans berries low- or nonfat milk whole grains, such as brown rice and whole-wheat pasta nuts sweet potatoes low- or nonfat yogurt poultry nonstarchy vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, collard greens, kale, and okra eggs oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines Staying hydrated is also important when it comes to overall health. Choose noncaloric options such as water and tea whenever possible. For people with diabetes, there are certain foods that should be limited. These foods can cause spikes in the Continue reading >>

Meal Timing

Meal Timing

“Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper,” is a saying attributed to 20th-century American nutrition activist Adelle Davis. Many people, of course, do not follow this advice to eat a large breakfast, a medium-large lunch, and a small dinner. It is commonplace in the United States for dinner to be the largest meal of the day, and some people see no problem in this. Others, however — including many researchers and people with diabetes — question whether timing meals this way produces the best health effects. This has led to some debate over whether a large dinner, or a late dinner, could be harmful to your health. A recent article at Fox News Latino, written by a registered dietitian, claims that eating dinner later in the evening has not been shown to cause weight gain or to produce ill health effects. The author notes that in many Latin countries, as well as in Europe, it is routine to eat dinner at 9 PM. The problem with late dinners in the United States, he claims, is that they are often the main source of food for the day due to hectic schedules and failure to prioritize meals. Thus, people are often starved at dinnertime and overeat. As a guideline to prevent this, he suggests that people should consume 70% of their day’s calories before dinner, but they may eat the remaining 30% as late as they want, except within 90 minutes before bed. A study published last year, however, somewhat contradicts the claim that meal timing makes no difference. Presented at Obesity 2010: The Obesity Society 28th Annual Scientific Meeting, the study found that eating a later dinner produced several metabolic effects. The participants were 10 healthy Japanese men with an average age of 40 and an average body-mass index (BMI) of 23. They were ea Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! Our Best Articles, Delivered Get expert advice on Diabetes from our coaches and trainers The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood Continue reading >>

Morning To Night Diabetes Management

Morning To Night Diabetes Management

Good diabetes management depends on following a routine that runs throughout your day — from the time you get up until your head hits the pillow again at night. That's because blood sugar levels are in constant flux during the day. They rise after meals and taper off during physical activity. The key to successfully managing type 2 diabetes and its symptoms is to keep your blood sugar levels as stable as possible. That's where a routine comes into play. Here are diabetes management tips to help cover every part of your day: In the Morning Check your blood sugar. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should check your blood sugar level every morning before you eat anything, says Marjorie Cypress, CDE, president of health care and education at the American Diabetes Association. This gives you a good baseline idea where you stand and allows you to make adjustments throughout the day. Eat breakfast. If you skip breakfast, you're already starting your day on the wrong foot. "Many people tend to skip breakfast, and it's one of the most important meals of the day," Cypress says. "You skip breakfast and you get hungrier and hungrier, and that's one of the reasons people tend to overeat later in the day." Eating regular meals will help keep your blood sugar levels steady, but skipping meals and then binging will cause spikes. Give your feet a once-over. Diabetes can cause your feet to lose feeling because of nerve damage. In extreme cases, a person with diabetes can end up having to have a foot amputated if an unnoticed cut becomes severely infected. Check your feet for any sores or cuts each morning. Also check your shoes before putting them on to make sure there's nothing in your shoe that could cause a sore. You might want to check your feet at bedtime, too. In the Afternoon Tak Continue reading >>

How Often Should I Eat?

How Often Should I Eat?

Q: How often should a person with type 2 diabetes eat? A: Everyone needs to eat about every four to six hours during the day to keep energy levels up. People with type 2 diabetes usually have better blood glucose control if their meals and carbohydrates are spaced evenly throughout the day. Too many carbohydrates at any one time can raise blood glucose too high, even if you take diabetes medicine. Many people tend to skip breakfast, eat a light lunch, and then eat too much in the evening. A person with diabetes should attempt to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates at each meal. Breakfast is especially important if you need to control your weight. It helps to jump-start your metabolism and makes you less likely to overeat later. If you are unusually active or on fixed doses of medication, you may need a snack. Monitoring your blood glucose will help you to decide that with your medical team. Sometimes diabetes medication can be adjusted so you do not need snacks if you are concerned about your weight. Connie Crawley, M.S., R.D., L.D., is a nutrition and health specialist for the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service and a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

Outsmart Diabetes 5-week Meal Plan

Outsmart Diabetes 5-week Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrientsfiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calciumwork together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacksany combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the " Fat-Fighting 4 ." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Follow this mix and match diabetic dietmeal planadapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Dietfor the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top c cooked oatmeal with c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Spread 100% whole grain bagel with 1 Tbsp low fat cream cheese. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched Continue reading >>

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

Meal Times And Diabetes: What’s The Connection?

Meal Times And Diabetes: What’s The Connection?

will have diabetes by 2050. With statistics like these, it’s becoming increasingly important that we understand the best way to eat in order to manage blood sugar levels. For well-planned meals to have the most benefit, we must first look at the timing of our meals and understand the impact it has on an individual’s blood sugar levels. Let’s take a closer look at why regular meal times are helpful: Prevent blood sugar fluctuations For individuals that are taking long-acting insulin or oral medications that assist with decreased blood sugar levels, eating at least every 4-5 hours is necessary to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. Promote weight loss When individuals are able to stabilize their blood sugar levels throughout the day, this helps regulate their appetite as well. It is well documented that when people with type 2 diabetes achieve a 5-10 percent weight loss, this will increase insulin sensitivity and help lower blood sugar. Improve overall nutrition The power of planning cannot be ignored when it comes to creating a healthy diabetes meal plan. While sometimes easier said than done, meals planned in advance will likely be more balanced and include better choices. When we arrive to a meal too hungry, we tend to choose whatever food is the closest to us, eat faster and in larger portion sizes. When an individual with diabetes has been encouraged to consume ‘regular’ meals, this can often be confusing if additional guidance is not provided. Generally, it is recommended to eat breakfast within 90 minutes of waking and then eat at least every 4-5 hours during the day after your first meal. Snacks are not necessary, but can be included if hunger is present between meals. In fact, bedtime snacks are very helpful. Since it is recommended to av Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Stabilize Blood Sugar With Meal Timing

5 Ways To Stabilize Blood Sugar With Meal Timing

When it comes to stabilizing your blood sugars, timing can be everything. From the hour of your first meal of the day to how late you eat at night, the timing of your meals can heavily dictate how well your blood sugars are managed on a daily basis. When my clients are in the habit of eating healthy still see peaks and valleys in their numbers, we sit down to re-evaluate when and how often they are eating. Here are five strategies to help you with better meal timing and keeping blood glucose in check: 1. Eat within the first few hours of rising Among the majority of my new clients, breakfast is the most-skipped meal of the day. Many people feel they don’t have time for breakfast, which is unfortunate because it truly is the most important meal – especially if you have diabetes. When you’re sleeping, your body is in a fasting-like state. When you wake up, eating within the first couple of hours can help break that fast (hence the name “breakfast”). And although it may seem like you’re saving yourself from extra calories or spiking your blood sugars, skipping breakfast can end up backfiring. You may find yourself over-eating at your first meal or gravitating more toward starchy or sugary foods. What’s worse, if blood glucose levels indeed drop too low, the body will send out hormones to release stored glucose into the blood stream, spiking your sugars and making it even harder to regulate your numbers throughout the day when you do finally eat. If you’re strapped for time, try to at least grab a small, balanced bite – pair a bit of protein with a high-fiber carbohydrate like peanut butter and whole-wheat toast, or a hard-boiled egg and fresh fruit. 2. Avoid Eating Right Before Bedtime It may be tempting to sneak in that late-night snack right before bedt Continue reading >>

4 Healthy Meal Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

4 Healthy Meal Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Food is an important part of our culture. We don’t eat just to sustain ourselves — we celebrate with food, and we often mourn with it too. So it's not surprising that if you’ve just been told that you have type 2 diabetes, one of your first thoughts will probably be, “but what will I eat?” Luckily, it’s not so difficult to eat well and enjoy food even if you have diabetes. The first thing is to learn the basics, says Kathy Honick, RN, CDE, a diabetes educator at Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. She recommends that all people newly diagnosed with diabetes “meet with a registered dietitian to learn about what they can and can’t eat.” A Healthy Diet is a Diabetes-Friendly Diet There’s no one-size-fits-all type of diabetic diet. Some people respond well to carbohydrate counting (keeping track of the amount of carbohydrates you ingest with each food product), others to portion control (adjusting portion size to produce desired blood sugar levels), and yet others to the diabetes food pyramid (eating a set number of portions of specific foods throughout the day). It may take some trial and error for you to find what works best for you, but your dietitian can help you with this, as can information from the American Diabetes Association. Food Choices Can Help (or Hurt) Your Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Plan Honick says “meal planning for someone with type 2 diabetes is about healthy eating with a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.” So, what should you choose? Fruits and vegetables are usually good choices, but be careful not to eat too much fruit. Check with your dietitian to see how much is recommended. Non-starchy vegetables are a good choice. These include spinach, carrots, broccoli, and green beans. Eat whole-grain foods, such as brown ric Continue reading >>

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