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Eating Out For Diabetics

Eating In Restaurants If You Have Diabetes

Eating In Restaurants If You Have Diabetes

Dining out should be a pleasure... ...not a chore. Whether there’s a special occasion to celebrate, a catch-up is long overdue, or simply just ‘because’, gathering together with friends and family to share food is a huge part of how we live our lives. There can’t be many of us who don’t enjoy a meal out, and having diabetes shouldn’t stop you. However, changes to eating routine, unknown ingredients and carb content in food, often generous portion sizes – these are just a handful of some of the issues which dining out can present, and are worth thinking about. Whether you have diabetes or not, these tips can help you keep the balance right when eating out and about. Portion sizes We've all had a meal in a restaurant that either seems really huge, or really small when it finally arrives on the table. While the latter can be disappointing, it's receiving a mountain of food that can really impact your otherwise healthy diet. Judging portion sizes can be tricky at the best of times, and made even harder when you're not preparing the dish yourself. If you're concerned about overeating or having more of a certain food than you should, read our advice on portion sizes. Making healthy choices Not only are so many options on a menu tempting, there's also the added disadvantage of not knowing exactly how the food has been prepared or what's gone into a meal. There are lots of ways you can maintain your healthy diet when eating out, such as choosing lighter, smaller versions of mains, opting for grilled meats that will likely be lower in fat, ask for dressings to be served on the side, and checking for steamed or grilled food as opposed to fried. For lots more tips, check out our information on eating out. Are you discovering that meals out are affecting your diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Diabetes nutrition — Make restaurant meals a healthy part of your diabetes meal plan. If you have diabetes, eating out while sticking to your nutrition plan has gotten easier. Many restaurants offer healthy alternatives. And you can plan what you want to order by looking at menus online, some of which provide nutrition information. Using this resource, minding portion sizes and choosing food carefully can help you make restaurant meals part of your overall plan for diabetes nutrition. Keep portion sizes in check Restaurants tend to serve large portions, possibly double or more what you normally eat. Try to eat the same size portions you would if you were eating at home by: Choosing the smallest meal size if the restaurant offers options: for example, a lunch-sized entree Sharing meals with a dining partner or two Requesting a take-home container Making a meal out of a salad or soup and an appetizer Avoid "all you can eat" buffets. It can be difficult to resist overeating with so many options. Even a small amount of many foods on your plate can add up to a lot of calories. Make substitutions Don't settle for what comes with your sandwich or meal. Instead of French fries, choose a diabetes-friendly side salad or a double order of a vegetable. Use fat-free or low-fat salad dressing, rather than the regular variety, or try a squeeze of lemon juice, flavored vinegar or salsa on your salad. Ask for salsa or pico de gallo, an uncooked salsa, with your burrito instead of shredded cheese and sour cream. On a sandwich, trade house dressings or creamy sauces for ketchup, mustard, horseradish or fresh tomato slices. Watch the extras Bacon bits, croutons, cheeses and other add-ons can sabotage diabetes nutrition goals by quickly increasing a meal's calories and carbohydrates. Even Continue reading >>

Eating Out

Eating Out

Having diabetes doesn’t deprive you of eating out. If you eat out regularly, you will need to pay close attention to food choices and serving sizes to manage your weight and diabetes. Don’t limit your enjoyment by thinking you need to go to a special restaurant or eat special meals just because you have diabetes. You’ll soon discover that many restaurants serve foods that are suitable for healthy eating. Most will also value your patronage and are more than happy to help if you can’t find something suitable on the menu. Ask restaurant staff about the dish of your choice and the way it’s been cooked, and request simple changes if required. Try to choose meals that: Are lower in fat and particularly low in saturated fat Contain breads, cereals (preferably wholegrain), vegetables (including legumes) and/or fruits Do not have a large amount of sugar added. Insulin & Eating Out When eating out there a few things you need to consider. Your meal may be served later than usual, so to avoid a ‘hypo’, take your insulin with you and give your injection as the meal arrives. Be sure to choose a meal with enough carbohydrate. Ask for extra bread, rice, potato, fruit or fruit juice if you need more. If you are having a bigger meal with more carbohydrate than usual, you may need to increase your insulin dose prior to the meal on that special occasion. Discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator first. What to Drink When you arrive ask for a jug of iced water before ordering other drinks. Throughout the meal drink: Water: plain, mineral or soda Low joule/calorie soft drinks Coffee, tea, herbal tea. Don’t drink fruit juice (unless you need additional carbohydrates). If you want to drink alcohol limit it to: 2 standard drinks a day for men 1 Continue reading >>

13 Tips For Eating Out If You Have Diabetes

13 Tips For Eating Out If You Have Diabetes

Source: Healthy Cooking, February/March 2011 Managing your diabetes doesn’t mean you have to start avoiding your favourite eatery. With just a few easy-to-swallow tips and smart strategies for fitting friends and restaurant fare into your menu plans, you can avoid some common pitfalls and keep your calories, carbs, blood sugar‘and even appetite’in line. Before you go 1. Splurge on an upscale restaurant. They tend to serve smaller portions of top quality foods and to feature local, in-season ingredients. Then, check out the lower-calorie, ‘special-diet’ selections. 2. Dine with other health conscious people. Research shows that diners tend to mimic the people around them. So if your friends order grilled, baked or broiled fish and salad with dressing on the side, you’re more likely to do the same. (Psst: Don’t forget to sample their entrees. The variety will make you feel as if you’ve indulged’and you’ll get an idea of what to order next time.) 3. Have a small snack at home an hour before your dinner reservation, if you’ll be eating later than usual. Munching on fruit, low-fat cheese or celery and carrots will curb your appetite and keep you wolfing down complimentary bread or tortilla chips while waiting to be served. 4. Go ahead, wear those tight-fitting pants or that fancy blouse‘anything that will help you steer clear of gorging or of taking a chance on ruining you best clothes with greasy ribs or heavily sauced entrees. At the table 5. After being seated, take a quick stroll around the room. Before ordering, excuse yourself to wash your hands; then, on your way to the restroom, check out other diners; dishes for portion sizes, heavy sauces, etc. You’ll have a better idea of what to order. 6. Start with a salad or clear soup. Either one is l Continue reading >>

How To Eat Out With Diabetes

How To Eat Out With Diabetes

Four Parts: Planning Your Meal Out Choosing Your Meal Eating Smaller Portions Keeping Drink Choices in Check Community Q&A Joining friends or family for a meal at a favorite restaurant is a fun way to spend time together, but managing your diabetes while eating out can be intimidating. Fortunately, eating out can still be fun and easy! When you eat out, it's important to stick to your normal meal schedule and plan ahead. Once you're at the restaurant, choosing smaller portions of healthy, low-sugar foods and drinks and watching your carbohydrate intake will keep you on track. Time your meal to coincide with your insulin or medication. Its best to eat at your normal meal times so that your blood sugar remains in the proper range. Tell your meal companions what time works best for you. [1] You could say, My normal dinner time is 6:00 p.m., so Ill need to eat around that time to keep my blood sugar stable. Schedule work lunches during your normal lunch hour. Talk to your doctor about the best way to adjust your medication schedule to accommodate a meal. Look up the restaurants menu online to check nutritional information. In addition to the calories in each dish, check the total carbohydrates and sugars for the dishes that interest you. Make a list of a few diabetic-friendly dishes that you could order when the time comes. [2] If the restaurant does not have nutritional information, do an internet search on the dishes listed to get a good approximation of the nutritional content. Its also a good idea to call the restaurant to ask for more information about the menu. Make a reservation to avoid waiting. A long wait could result in a late meal, possibly resulting in low blood sugar. Its important that you try to stick to your normal meal time, and a reservation is the best Continue reading >>

9 Tips For Dining Out

9 Tips For Dining Out

The Diabetes Plate Method can be your guide when eating away from home Don't panic when it comes time for eating out. The Diabetes Plate Method can be a guide for how you order food at a restaurant or take-out counter. Keep the basic plate principles in mind as you read the menu or order board. Because nonstarchy vegetables are the food to eat the most of, pick menu items that offer a large amount of them. Ask whether you can swap the fries or chips that come with your order for a salad or side order of nonstarchy vegetables. Focus on stir-fries with vegetables (order extra veggies), chicken, and brown rice; this includes all the components of the plate method. Consider soup and salad combinations that offer a vegetable soup and a side salad; add grilled chicken or shrimp for protein. Look for turkey or salmon burgers. Order with a side of broccoli or salad for your vegetable serving (the bun would count as the grain/starch serving and the burger would be your protein serving). Avoid large pasta dishes that have too much starch and not enough veggies. Or ask the server for just half the pasta or half the pasta combined with steamed veggies. Swap out all or part of the rice at fast-casual Asian restaurants with steamed vegetables. Make use of take-home containers. Halve too-large portions of grains or starchy foods and meat and take a portion home to enjoy for another meal. At Mexican restaurants, there tend to be many starchy foods. Instead of eating tortilla chips, rice, and beans, opt for one of these (the beans are likely to be the most nutritious option). Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants Yes, you can eat outpretty much anywhere! Here's how to make smart choices. When you have diabetes, eating out can seem more complicated than deciphering the new tax code. But it doesnt have to be. People with diabetes can enjoy most any kind of restaurant, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week . The key is to stick as closely to your usual meal plan as possible. Heres how. (Find out how to stop the craving cycle before it starts and burn fat around the clock with the naturally sweet, salty, and satisfying meals in Eat Clean, Lose Weight & Love Every Bite .) Worried about all that crust? Go with one slice of thin crust pizza and youll lighten the carb count of your slice by a third compared to a regular slice. If a single slice sounds too skimpy, pump up the volumeand the fiber by adding plenty of chopped veggies. And speaking of veggies, filling up on a salad before your pie arrives can also put the breaks on hunger. These pita pizzas will totally change the way you think about dinner: Given that pasta is packed with carbohydrates, its probably not the best idea to make it the center of your meal, says Weisenberger. Just one order of spaghetti and meatballs can easily pack 150 grams of carbs. That doesnt mean you have to go 100% pasta-free though. Weisenberger recommends ordering pasta as a side dish and limiting your portion to a half-cup, or about the size of a tennis ball. Pair it with an order of mussels fra diavolo, chicken cacciatore, or grilled calamari. (And make sure you try these 6 ways to make Italian food flat belly-friendly! ) If youre eating Chinese food, chances are theres going to be rice on your plate. And if that rice is white, be prep Continue reading >>

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics Don't let your diabetes get in the way of dining out. The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics Don't let your diabetes get in the way of dining out. Breaking news: you dont need to fret about your blood sugar spiking when you eat out! The team at Eat This, Not That! has got the 4-1-1 on the healthiest meals diabetics can order. If you have Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) or Type 2 DM, eating out can be a struggle. For example, you may not be as willing to sample an appetizer, or order that bowl of pasta because youre not sure how many grams of carbs are hidden between each twirl of noodles. And dessert? Forget about it. Theres probably way too much sugar for your pancreas to handle. Enough is enough. Youre allowed to indulge and order that carby dish youve been craving for since yesterday. All you need to do is a little bit of research before tackling the menu. The best news of all is youre not alone. According to the CDC, 29.1 million people have diabetes in the United Statesthats 10% of the entire population. Fortunately, Type 2 DM may be reversible if you eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and lean protein while avoiding processed foods. Until then, here are a handful of diabetic-friendly meals you can order from your favorite restaurants. And make sure to read up on the 15 Secret Diabetes Remedies for more helpful tips on how you can manage your Type 2 Diabetes. Noodles and Companys Med Salad with Chicken Nutrition: 370 calories, 15 g fat (5 g saturated fat), 1,460 mg sodium, 33 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 27 g protein Full disclosure here: Above are the nutrition facts for the full size dish, and this salad contains both noodles and cheese for a total of only 33 grams of carbs. Shoutout to Noodles and Compan Continue reading >>

Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

Eating out can be challenging for people with diabetes . Restaurants serve huge portions, and eating too many carbohydrates and sugars can lead to high blood sugar especially if you use insulin and don't know the carb count. However, people with diabetes can still enjoy meals out without sacrificing tight blood sugar control. There are many ways to lower your carb and sugar intake at meals. All you need to do is plan ahead and have some strategies in place to make healthier food choices. Avoid wasting calories on sugary drinks with little nutritional value. Iced tea and water are healthier alternatives to soda or juice (unless your blood sugar is low). Watch out for refills. If you've ordered a sugary drink such as lemonade or soda, keep track of how much you are drinking, paying attention to every refill. Those carbs will affect your blood sugar and need to be accounted for. If you've ordered something with few carbs, like tea or water, you can get as many refills as you like without thinking about it twice. If you choose to drink alcohol, be careful. Make sure that your blood sugar is high enough and that you and your doctor have decided that this is a safe choice for you. Never drink on an empty stomach. This increases the risk of low blood sugar. Moderation is key when drinking alcohol. Try to stick to one or two drinks. This will help prevent low blood sugar. Ordering wine or beer is generally a safer and easier choice, as it is easy to keep track of how much alcohol you are consuming and how many carbs it has. Mixed drinks can have more than one serving, or shot, of alcohol. Plus, the mixers themselves have carbs and sugars with little nutritional value. Not sure of how many carbs your drink has? Check the USDA's Food-A-Pedia Many restaurants have lighter options Continue reading >>

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Mmm . . . Italian food . . . Chinese . . . seafood . . . no, wait Mexican! Definitely Mexican food tonight! Sound familiar? Everybody loves to eat out. Can kids with diabetes go out to restaurants? Sure they can. Kids who have diabetes don't need to eat a special diet. But like all kids, they should eat a mix of healthy foods. No restaurant is off-limits, but if you're helping to choose a restaurant, look for ones that offer some nutritious items. You can check out menus online. You don't have to find a place that serves soy burgers and carrot sticks although that might be yummy! If you can choose some protein , fats , and carbohydrates , then you'll be able to stick to your meal plan. Sometimes you'll go to restaurants that have just what you want and need. Other times, you may have trouble finding something that fits into your meal plan. If that happens, remember that you're in the driver's seat. You don't just have to order blindly or take whatever is on the menu. Many restaurants will answer your questions and make substitutions, if you request them. Get answers. Sometimes, the menu doesn't really tell you what's in a dish or how it's prepared (for example, whether it's baked or fried). Go ahead and ask. The person taking your order should know the answers or be able to find them out for you. Make changes. To get a well-balanced meal, ask if you can substitute certain ingredients or side orders (for example, you could ask for salad instead of fries). Don't feel weird about it people ask for changes all the time. In some restaurants, you can ask the cook to prepare something in a different way. You might ask to have your chicken broiled instead of fried, for example. Watch the sides. Avoid foods with sauces or gravy, and ask for low-fat salad dressings on the side. Continue reading >>

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Before taking CONTRAVE, tell your healthcare provider ab Continue reading >>

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Two of the best tips you can use at restaurants are to watch the salt and cut the portions. Experts recommend that people with diabetes get only 1,500 milligrams of sodium daily. That's less than a teaspoon. These course-by-course tips will help: Appetizers Choose fresh fruit or vegetables. Avoid soups and broths. Stay away from bread and rolls with salty, buttery crusts. Salads Avoid pickles, canned or marinated vegetables, cured meats, seasoned croutons, cheeses, and salted seeds. Order salad dressings on the side, and use small amounts of them. Main courses Choose plain foods including broiled, grilled, or roasted meat, poultry, fish, or shellfish. Select plain vegetables, potatoes, and noodles. Ask your server about the low-salt menu choices, and ask how the food is prepared. Ask for food to be cooked without salt or monosodium glutamate (MSG). Avoid restaurants that do not allow for special food preparation (such as buffet-style restaurants and diners). Avoid casseroles, mixed dishes, gravies, and sauces. At fast-food restaurants, skip the special sauces, condiments, and cheese. Avoid salted condiments and garnishes such as olives and pickles. Desserts Choose fresh fruits, ices, sherbet, gelatin, and plain cakes. Servings at many restaurants are often big enough to provide lunch for 2 days. When eating out: Ask for half or smaller portions. Eyeball your appropriate portion, set the rest aside, and ask for a doggie bag right away. If you have dessert, share. Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Guide To Eating In Restaurants

A Diabetes Guide To Eating In Restaurants

The American Diabetes Association recently published a new book by Hope S. Warshaw called Eat Out, Eat Well, The Guide to Eating Healthy in Any Restaurant. Ms. Warshaw is a registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator, and has written many other books on the subject of eating with diabetes, including a book similar this one. Eat Out, Eat Well, however, is a more comprehensive and updated version of her previous work. What The Little Brown Handbook is to writers, this book may be for those with diabetes who eat out often and feel they lack information about the food they are eating. Eat Out, Eat Well serves those looking for hefty coverage of nutrition and how it relates to diabetes, and any type of restaurant eating, from fast food to ethnic cuisines to the upscale restaurant. Eat Out, Eat Well isn’t a book you will sit down to read and be done with. At over 550 pages, it is a large resource that you’re likely to spot read and refer to as needed. Warshaw starts with giving a modern assessment of today’s restaurant landscape. One of the most helpful things I found in the book was a chapter on “The 10 Skills and Strategies for Healthier Restaurant Eating” where she targets common behaviors we all have and suggests ways we can set ourselves up for success when we do eat out. Those ten tips alone would make an enormous difference for anyone who eats out often. There is a chapter on specific dilemmas a person with diabetes may have when eating out and tips on how to cope. Warshaw has also written a chapter on the subject of Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. I’m someone who has studied nutrition and I’ve had diabetes for many years. I find that eating out is generally not conducive to healthy eating. However, when looking at this book I had to recogniz Continue reading >>

8 Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

8 Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

Sticking to a diabetes meal plan is one of the most important parts of managing type 2 diabetes. Knowing what foods to eat and which cooking methods are healthiest are key parts of eating well at home or when eating out. Following your meal plan becomes tricky when you aren’t the one preparing the food, but eating out doesn’t have to knock you off course. It’s possible to get delicious, healthy meals at restaurants and still stick to your diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

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