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Dry Skin Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Dry Skin?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Dry Skin?

It’s not so much that diabetes itself causes dry skin -- it’s the dehydration that results from poor blood sugar control. When your blood sugar level is high, that causes your body to lose fluid. In turn, that causes you to become dehydrated. The solution, of course, is to keep your blood sugar in check -- which you want to do for many other reasons besides dry skin. So, control your diabetes, and you can control your dry skin! [There are good tips here if you want to add more: Diabetes may dry your skin because having high sugar levels in your blood causes your body to lose fluid, including moisture from your skin. Also, nerve damage caused by diabetes may interfere with your ability to perspire normally, lessening the amount of moisture on your skin. Dry skin can crack and become more prone to infection. To help keep your skin moist, avoid very hot showers and baths, use mild cleansers and apply moisturizer to your skin while it is still damp. Examine your skin daily, and if you notice any signs of infection, such as red or sore spots, see your doctor. Dry skin is a complication of diabetes. It is caused by high blood glucose (high blood sugar) levels in the blood which zap moisture away from the tissues such as the skin. Another cause of dry skin for a diabetic is due to poor circulation. Poor circulation can cause the sweat glands to slow down or even shut down. Without sweat to cool the skin, the skin becomes dry. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

If you have diabetic skin problems, like itchy skin, it's important to care for your skin properly – read on for tips to add to your skin care regime! If you have diabetes then you’re more likely to have dry skin, which can lead to itchiness. Are you one of those who suffer with diabetes and itchy skin? Itchy skin and diabetes often go together. The good news is that by taking care of your skin, you may be able to help reduce the risk of developing skin problems due to dryness and maintain healthy-looking, smooth skin. 1 Itchy skin, diabetes related or not, can often be made worse by washing with the wrong skin care products that increase skin dryness. Although you might think you’re doing the right thing by keeping your skin clean, if you’re using the wrong products, or washing too frequently, then you can actually aggravate the problem. Try to use mild and gentle soaps that are free from harsh chemicals and heavy perfumes. Unless it’s necessary, don’t wash your skin more than twice a day – washing too often, especially with hot water, can actually dry the skin out more. Avoiding these triggers may help to minimize itchiness. 2 If you’ve got diabetes, itchy skin due to dryness can be a concern. A good moisturizer like Vaseline® Intensive Care™ Advanced Repair Unscented Lotion may help to soothe and relieve itchiness. With micro-droplets of Vaseline® Jelly and glycerin, this lotion locks in essential moisture to help facilitate the skin’s natural recovery process. It’s fast absorbing and gentle on skin. Moisturizing can help to calm your dry skin and may reduce the urge to scratch. Remember, even though dry, itchy skin can be uncomfortable, always try your best to avoid scratching as this can lead to skin becoming damaged. If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Skin Care Tips

6 Diabetes Skin Care Tips

Diabetes makes you more likely to get a wide range of skin problems. But you can do a lot to keep yours healthy. These simple tips can help. Get educated. One key to preventing problems is to understand what causes them. Talk to your doctor. Learn about the complications, what your particular risks are, and how you can lower them. Control your diabetes. Get -- and keep -- your blood sugar within a normal range. If you already have skin problems, you can stop them from getting worse. Strive for a healthy weight, eat right, cut back on salt, maintain a healthy blood pressure, and exercise. That's a tall order, but talk to your health care team for support. Be aware. If you have diabetic nerve damage, which is called neuropathy, you could have an infected cut, scratch, or skin puncture and not know it. Don't let a small problem turn into a big one. Be aware of your body. Check your legs, ankles, feet, and in between your toes every day for new wounds or old ones that never seem to heal. Treat wounds and sores. Don't neglect them. If you find a nick, a scratch, a small cut, or anything that isn't healing or that worries you, talk to your doctor right away. Cover up. This simple first line of defense can help you avoid the cuts and scratches that can lead to infection. Whether you're gardening or walking the dog, cover your legs with long pants and your feet with flat, well-fitting shoes. Prevent dry skin. Skin that's too dry can crack, itch, and get infected. Keep your skin -- especially at armpits, toes, and groin -- clean and dry, but not too dry. Take short, lukewarm showers or baths and use mild soaps and shampoos when you wash. Skip deodorant or scented cleansers, which can be harsh on sensitive skin. Moisturize if your skin is dry. The best time is right after a showe Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

Good Skin Care And Diabetes

Good Skin Care And Diabetes

People with diabetes are prone to dry skin, particularly when blood glucose levels run high. This causes the body to lose fluids and skin to become dry. Dry skin can crack and itch, which can lead to infections. You may also get dry skin with diabetes if you have neuropathy. The nerves in the legs and feet may not get the message to sweat, which is necessary to keep skin soft and moist. Keeping your skin moisturized when you have diabetes is one of the easiest ways to prevent skin problems. Here are some other ways you can prevent skin problems with diabetes: After you wash with a mild soap, rinse and dry thoroughly in every nook and cranny of your body. Use a moisturizer, but not between your toes. Avoid very hot baths and showers, which can dry your skin. “Avoid soaking your feet too,” says Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, at Joslin Diabetes Center. “Extended exposure to water softens the feet and makes your skin more prone to being pierced.” Inspect your body for red spots, blisters and sores that could lead to infection. Look for any bumps or changes in appearance on your feet and have your doctor look at your feet at least twice a year during your physical. Treat cuts right away. Wash minor cuts with soap and water. Keep your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. Control blood pressure and cholesterol by taking prescribed medications, which will improve circulation and keep your skin healthy. Drink plenty of fluids, like water and caffeine-free, sugar-free drinks, to keep your skin hydrated. Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which nourish the skin. This includes fish like salmon, sardines, albacore tuna and mackerel, as well as tofu and other forms of soybeans, walnuts, flaxseed and their oils. If you notice any skin problems, let your health car Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy: More Than Just Dry Skin?

Diabetic Dermopathy: More Than Just Dry Skin?

I’ve been a type 1 diabetic now for the past 10 years and I’ve heard of most of the associated complications associated with the disease, but I came across an article a couple weeks back about diabetic dermopathy shin spots and how they are more prevalent in type 1 diabetics. Well, never hearing of it, it automatically peaked my interest and the fact that I’ve personally had a couple of sketchy spots on my lower legs over the years, I started to research diabetic dermopathy and what it was all about, so let’s take a closer look! What Causes Diabetic Dermopathy? One of the more popular diabetic skin ailment (yay us!), diabetic dermopathy is found in more than 50% of individuals dealing with the disease. Diabetic dermopathy is a harmless condition and is likely the most common skin problem in people who have had diabetes for some time, or whose blood sugar levels are poorly controlled and remain high over a prolonged period of time. The exact cause of diabetic dermopathy is unknown but may actually be associated with diabetic neuropathic (nerve) and vascular (blood vessels) complications, as studies have shown the condition to occur more frequently in diabetic patients with retinopathy (retinal damage of the eye), neuropathy (nerve/sensory damage) and nephropathy (kidney damage). Diabetic dermopathy tends to occur in older patients or those who have had diabetes for at least 10-20 years. It also appears to be closely linked to increased glycosylated haemoglobin, an indicator of poor control of blood glucose levels. Because lesions often occur over bony parts of the body such as the shins, it is thought that diabetic dermopathy may also be a magnified response to injury or trauma to these areas. Studies have shown that shin spots have appeared in response to trauma Continue reading >>

Diabetes Dry Skin – Best Remedies

Diabetes Dry Skin – Best Remedies

Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can be associated with skin problems, including dry skin. No one knows exactly why dry skin is associated with diabetes but most diabetic experts agree that things like diabetic dry skin conditions can be easily managed with simple tips, including the following: Control the blood sugar numbers. If your blood sugar is out of control, you will have a greater likelihood of suffering from dry skin. In order to get your diabetes under control, you’ll need to watch what you eat, try and achieve a healthy weight, decrease salt intake, maintain a normal blood pressure, and exercise to maintain a healthy weight. Talk to your doctor. Your doctor may be able to help you identify some of the skin conditions you are experiencing as a result of having diabetes. The doctor will be able to evaluate your dry skin and will be able to make recommendations about which treatments you can do that will correct the dry skin and other skin conditions associated with having diabetes mellitus. Recognize diabetic nerve damage. If you are suffering from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage from elevated blood sugar levels), you will need to take special care to manage your dry skin. With diabetic nerve damage, you may not be aware of dry skin conditions and you have an increased likelihood of having cracks in the skin that can get infected. If you have dry skin and diabetic nerve damage, you’ll need to check the skin of your lower extremities every day to make sure that you haven’t developed any type of crack or tear in the skin that you didn’t notice because of numbness secondary to neuropathy. Get treatment for any wounds you may have. If you find that you have a tear or cut from dry skin, be aware that the likelihood of developing an infection is hig Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dry Skin

Diabetes And Dry Skin

What are the effects of diabetes on skin? The onset of diabetes can affect all areas of the body and the skin is no exception. Skin becomes sensitive, dry, itchy and cracked and more prone to infection; both bacterial and fungal. With the onset of diabetes, the body becomes dehydrated and dried out. Excess water is used to remove glucose from the blood and this causes dehydration and dry, cracked skin. Those with diabetes tend to have more skin problems than those without, and the disease constantly breaks down the skins defenses, making it dry, cracked and more prone to irritation and infections. The areas of the body thatshow dry skin the most are the extremities such as arms, hands, legs and feet, but dry cracked lips are common as well. Tips for managing dry skin due to diabetes: Keep skin clean and well hydrated at all times Avoid prolonged hot baths or showers and use a mild fragrance-free cleanser Apply an emollient rich moisturizer all over the body after bathing Adopt a daily skincare regimen from head to toe, paying special attention to lower extremities such as legs, feet and heels Treat minor cuts, scrapes and burns immediately and seek a physicians care if infection sets in Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

The Prescription For Dry Winter Skin

The Prescription For Dry Winter Skin

The air outside is cold and dry. Inside, fires and furnaces bake away what little moisture is left in the atmosphere. Break out the lip balm and hand lotion. Its the dry, itchy skin and chapped lips time of the year winter in Diabetes Land. What can you do to keep dry skin in check this time of year? How bad does dry skin have to get before you need to see your doctor? And why do we seem to have more problems with dry skin than everyone else? Is dry skin caused by diabetes or high blood sugar? John Anthony, MD, a dermatologist for the Cleveland Clinic, thinks that theres something lurking in the skin or DNA of people with diabetes that makes them prone to dry skin. According to him, research shows that fully 26 percent of people with diabetes suffer various problems with dry skin, although he states, I dont think we understand why, adding, its a bit of a mystery. But to Lauren Levy, MD, of the Yale School of Medicine, an expert on skin conditions related to diabetes, its no mystery at all. For her, its simple. She thinks dry skin is 100 percent caused by hyperglycemia elevated blood sugar in uncontrolled diabetes saying matter-of-factly, It dehydrates the skin. Meanwhile, in the trenches, certified diabetes educator (CDE) Erin Kelly, who works for Harvards Joslin Diabetes Center, isnt so sure. She says, We see dry skin across the board with all patients. Rarely would I assert that the dry skin is caused by hyperglycemia; its too hard to correlate in the presence of other factors. So take your pick, but regardless of the cause of the dry, itchy hands and cracked lips, you need to fix the problem, both for comfort and, because left alone, dry skin can become a dangerous ticking time bomb for people with diabetes. While there doesnt seem to be much agreement on the causes Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health: Conditions And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health: Conditions And Treatment

Skin complications usually occur when blood sugar levels are too high, and they are often the first visible sign of diabetes. An estimated one-third of people with diabetes experience skin conditions either related to or influenced by the condition. Medication options exist, but managing blood sugars is normally the best prevention and treatment option. How does type 2 diabetes affect skin health? When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, several changes take place in the body that affect skin health. Blood sugar is removed from the body through the urine. When there is excess blood sugar, the rate of urination increases, which can cause dehydration and dry skin. High blood sugar levels can also lead to inflammation, which over time dulls or overstimulates the immune response. High blood sugar levels can also cause nerve and blood vessel damage, reducing circulation. Poor blood flow can alter the skin's structure, especially its collagen. Without healthy collagen networks, the skin can become stiff and in some cases brittle. Collagen is also necessary for proper wound healing. Skin conditions associated with type 2 diabetes Several skin conditions are associated with high or uncontrolled blood sugar levels. While most skin complications associated with diabetes are harmless, the symptoms of some can be painful, persistent, and they may require medical attention. The best and easiest treatment option for most diabetes-related skin conditions is managing blood sugar levels. In severe cases, however, oral steroids or medicated creams may be used. Common skin conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include the following: Acanthosis nigricans This condition is marked by a darkened band of velvety skin, especially in the folds near the groin, back of the neck, or Continue reading >>

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