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Dry Knuckles Diabetes

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Top Diabetes Skin Conditions And How To Spot Them

Top Diabetes Skin Conditions And How To Spot Them

Top Diabetes Skin Conditions and How to Spot Them Got an itchy rash or bumps that wont go away? It could be a result of diabetes, a chronic metabolic disorder that affects major organs. See which diabetes skin treatments will work for you... Diabetes elevates blood sugar levels, leading to high blood pressure, glaucoma and even serious problems in your heart. The chronic metabolic disorder can also leave its mark on your largest organ: your skin. About 33% of people with diabetes develop a related skin condition, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). In fact, a chronic rash, fungal infection or blister is often the first clue to the disease. Most skin conditions are due to immune-system deficiencies caused by high blood sugar, says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. These outbreaks can be as benign as dry skin or small yellow rashes (resulting from high cholesterol) to brown spots (signaling insulin resistance), boils and serious infections that could land you in a hospital. The key is to get treatment early before they turn into a major problem, advises Debra Jaliman, MD, FAAD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Read on to identify the most common diabetes skin conditions and how to treat them. When blood glucose levels run high, cells lose fluid and skin becomes dry, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard Medical School. Diabetics also urinate a lot [because of] high blood sugar, causing dehydration, explains Dr. Hatipoglu. To hydrate adequately, drink plenty of fluids, like water and caffeine-free, sugar-free drinks. Avoid hot baths and showers, which dry up skin. Use an extremely mild, emollient soap with no fragrance, Dr. Jaliman says. Choose mild prod Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Cuts/dry Hands | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Cuts/dry Hands | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My hands are really rough & dry. Every few days cuts appear, making my fingers very sore. I was putting this down to the cold weather we have been having,but am now wondering if this is diabetes related? Any one else had this problem? Hi Ruby 777 I thought it was just me. I couldn't understand it because I made sure that I always wore gloves whenever I was out in the cold, but I have terrible cracks around my fingers and the backs of my hands are all chapped, very sore and bleeding. Hi, I have the same problem, and so did my mother. I have found using Aqueous Cream, available from Boots and Sainsburys very effective at reducing the dryness and the cracking of the skin. It gives the skin moisture, reducing the dryness and cracking. A large tub is under 5.00. I have had it on prescription when I have had bad eczema attacks. If you have a good GP you will probably be able to get it on prescription. Thanks for the replies, it's been driving me crazy lol. Will try the cream Neutrogena Norwegian Formula handcream is heavy duty yet is non greasy and it really does heal any cuts and protects from further damage. As a nurse I swear by l'occitain shea butter hand cream. Its kind of expensive but a large tube hss lasted me ages. Sent from my GT-I9300 using DCUK Forum mobile app I also have a problem with dry skin. I use E-45 and I think it does the job very well Still get dry skin but the splits in my fingers don't happen now I have my BS under control. Used to use Germolene New Skin to stick the splits together. The wife suffers from Eczema on the hands and occassionally uses a hydrochrortisone cream. Awful stuff, appears to thin the skin so causing more harm t Continue reading >>

Dry Cracking Knuckles, Due To Winter.

Dry Cracking Knuckles, Due To Winter.

My knuckles are dry and cracking. I get this every winter when it's windy. They say that when you get nueropathy in your feet they sometimes dry up an crack becuase you dont' get enough oil. When the air is dry the same thing happens to your knuckles. They are cracking and bleeding. I had this happen last year durning the winter. I can see how this would be scary if it happened to you feet and how it would be difficult to heal if your body didn't supply oil to your skin. Scary. Try living in the cold, windy midwest with constant heat on. The trick is to moisurise constantly. Get a cream with aloe in it. Some work better than others. Also drink lots of water. My skin seemed to be worst when I was newly diagnosed. Now that I'm controlling my carbs and taking metformin, my skin has improved immensely. At night I moisturise my heals and sometimes leave socks on to trap the moisture in. There are lots of specialty foot and heel creams. D.D. Family preD 1971 - T2 2003 - insulin 2005 corn huskers lotion at nite and then again in the morning has helped my hubby with the dry skin he gets from working out in the cold windy weather. His skin used to crack all the time too and he is not diabetic metformin-2000mg, lisinopril-20mg, thyronorm-137mcg corn huskers lotion is what I was going to recommend also, but not sure if it is good for diabetics to use. Check with your pharmist first before buying and using. Hope this works for you. We're/I'm doing better in that department. We got the humidifier going and I have a shelf of lotions all lined up to finish off. Been soaking feet about every other evening. Find I have trouble wearing socks but getting more used to it. My mother had trouble wearing socks too. ?? My ankles are not swollen or puffy. Just feels odd. Got a new pair of slip Continue reading >>

Good Skin Care And Diabetes

Good Skin Care And Diabetes

People with diabetes are prone to dry skin, particularly when blood glucose levels run high. This causes the body to lose fluids and skin to become dry. Dry skin can crack and itch, which can lead to infections. You may also get dry skin with diabetes if you have neuropathy. The nerves in the legs and feet may not get the message to sweat, which is necessary to keep skin soft and moist. Keeping your skin moisturized when you have diabetes is one of the easiest ways to prevent skin problems. Here are some other ways you can prevent skin problems with diabetes: After you wash with a mild soap, rinse and dry thoroughly in every nook and cranny of your body. Use a moisturizer, but not between your toes. Avoid very hot baths and showers, which can dry your skin. “Avoid soaking your feet too,” says Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, at Joslin Diabetes Center. “Extended exposure to water softens the feet and makes your skin more prone to being pierced.” Inspect your body for red spots, blisters and sores that could lead to infection. Look for any bumps or changes in appearance on your feet and have your doctor look at your feet at least twice a year during your physical. Treat cuts right away. Wash minor cuts with soap and water. Keep your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. Control blood pressure and cholesterol by taking prescribed medications, which will improve circulation and keep your skin healthy. Drink plenty of fluids, like water and caffeine-free, sugar-free drinks, to keep your skin hydrated. Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which nourish the skin. This includes fish like salmon, sardines, albacore tuna and mackerel, as well as tofu and other forms of soybeans, walnuts, flaxseed and their oils. If you notice any skin problems, let your health car Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Skin Care Tips

6 Diabetes Skin Care Tips

Diabetes makes you more likely to get a wide range of skin problems. But you can do a lot to keep yours healthy. These simple tips can help. Get educated. One key to preventing problems is to understand what causes them. Talk to your doctor. Learn about the complications, what your particular risks are, and how you can lower them. Control your diabetes. Get -- and keep -- your blood sugar within a normal range. If you already have skin problems, you can stop them from getting worse. Strive for a healthy weight, eat right, cut back on salt, maintain a healthy blood pressure, and exercise. That's a tall order, but talk to your health care team for support. Be aware. If you have diabetic nerve damage, which is called neuropathy, you could have an infected cut, scratch, or skin puncture and not know it. Don't let a small problem turn into a big one. Be aware of your body. Check your legs, ankles, feet, and in between your toes every day for new wounds or old ones that never seem to heal. Treat wounds and sores. Don't neglect them. If you find a nick, a scratch, a small cut, or anything that isn't healing or that worries you, talk to your doctor right away. Cover up. This simple first line of defense can help you avoid the cuts and scratches that can lead to infection. Whether you're gardening or walking the dog, cover your legs with long pants and your feet with flat, well-fitting shoes. Prevent dry skin. Skin that's too dry can crack, itch, and get infected. Keep your skin -- especially at armpits, toes, and groin -- clean and dry, but not too dry. Take short, lukewarm showers or baths and use mild soaps and shampoos when you wash. Skip deodorant or scented cleansers, which can be harsh on sensitive skin. Moisturize if your skin is dry. The best time is right after a showe Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

Prediabetes is a new word for a fast-rising problem around the world. It’s a diagnosis made when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be called diabetes. “Prediabetes is this kind of grey zone,” says Dr. Stewart Harris, a professor in family medicine at the University of Western Ontario’s Schulich School of Medicine who specializes in diabetes. “Your body is metabolically losing the ability to manage blood sugars after eating, and they start to creep up.” As many as six million Canadians can be considered to have prediabetes. The trouble is, many of them don’t know it. Prediabetes often has no symptoms at all. Yet if these people don’t take steps to control their blood sugar now, a diagnosis of diabetes within the next few years is highly likely. Could you have prediabetes? Here are five signs that you might. 1. You’re in a high-risk group for type 2 diabetes. Researchers have identified certain people who are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. These folks are also at risk for prediabetes. If you have a family history of diabetes or an Aboriginal, South Asian, Asian, African or Hispanic background, you’re at higher risk for prediabetes. Other risk factors include being older than 45 and having a sedentary lifestyle. 2. You have a health problem linked to prediabetes. The condition of your body can sometimes point to high blood sugar. If you’re overweight or obese’that is, if your body mass index is over 25’you could have prediabetes. Same goes for having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease or polycystic ovarian syndrome. If you had gestational diabetes, or diabetes diagnosed when you were pregnant, you could develop prediabetes after the baby’s born. 3. You have classic diabetes symptoms Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Very Dry Skin On One Hand

Very Dry Skin On One Hand

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi everyone. In the last weeks I've notice very dry skin on my right hand. Didn't care much, but tonight it started bleeding a bit between 2 fingers. I'm going to tell to my doctor tomorrow. For now using a body lotion on the hand. Did someone have similar issues? I have read that this might be related to diabetes. I have the same problem. Diprobase (available at the chemist) is very effective, I find. It can be used easily on broken skin and rehydrates skin quickly. Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app I have the same problem. Diprobase (available at the chemist) is very effective, I find. It can be used easily on broken skin and rehydrates skin quickly. Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app Hi, thanks for your answer. Since when are you having this problem? I've had the problem since first falling ill with Type 1 Diabetes prior to diagnosis. Achieving good control with Diabetes has helped but skin splitting and bleeding on my hands has never fully gone away. I've tried lots of hand creams but Diprobase is the most effective for me at stopping the skin splitting and bringing my hands back to normal. I believe it is very much to do with the diabetes. Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app I'm having the same sort of thing on the top of both my feet.. it's driving me crazy. I'm using aveeno at the moment trying to get it hydrated. But my skin has been getting drier than usual lately despite moisturising cream. I'm not sure if it has to do with any of my meds I'm on or what. I'm on bolus & basal insulin too. Hello @P17BULL what is your blood sugar doing at th moment? I find that high blood sugar can cause dry skin - high bl Continue reading >>

Acanthosis Nigricans

Acanthosis Nigricans

What is acanthosis nigricans? Acanthosis nigricans is a fairly common skin pigmentation disorder. The most notable sign of acanthosis nigricans is dark patches of skin with a thick, velvety texture. The affected areas of skin may also itch or have an odor. These patches may appear on skin folds and other areas, such as the: armpits groin neck elbows knees knuckles lips palms soles of the feet Acanthosis nigricans may be a sign of a more serious health problem, such as prediabetes. The most effective treatments focus on finding and resolving medical conditions at the root of the problem. These skin patches tend to disappear after successfully treating the root condition. Acanthosis nigricans is seen in both men and women. It’s most common in those who are overweight, have darker skin, and have diabetes or prediabetic conditions. Children who develop acanthosis nigricans are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. The frequency of acanthosis nigricans varies between ethnic groups. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, people of African, Caribbean, or Hispanic descent are also at an increased risk. All ethnic groups are equally at risk of acanthosis nigricans when body mass index (BMI) is well above normal. Acanthosis nigricans skin patches occur when epidermal skin cells begin to reproduce rapidly. This abnormal skin cell growth is most commonly triggered by high levels of insulin in the blood. In rare cases, the increase in skin cells may be caused by medications, cancer, or other medical conditions. Too much insulin The most frequent trigger for acanthosis nigricans is too much insulin in your bloodstream. When you eat, your body converts carbohydrates into sugar molecules such as glucose. Some of this glucose is used for energy in yo Continue reading >>

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