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Drugs That Can Cause Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Tweet A number of medications have side effects which include the raising of blood glucose levels. Drug induced diabetes is when use of a specific medication has lead to the development of diabetes. In some cases the development of diabetes may be reversible if use of the medication is discontinued, but in other cases drug-induced diabetes may be permanent. Drug induced diabetes is a form of secondary diabetes, in other words diabetes that is a consequence of having another health condition. Which drugs can induce diabetes? A number of drugs have been linked with an increased risk development of type 2 diabetes. Corticosteroids Thiazide diuretics Beta-blockers Antipsychotics Is diabetes permanent? Diabetes may not be permanent but this can depend on other health factors. With some medications, blood glucose levels may return back to normal once the medication is stopped but, in some cases, the development of diabetes may be permanent. Managing drug induced diabetes If you need to continue taking the medication that has brought on diabetes, it may make your diabetes more difficult to control than would otherwise be the case. If you are able to stop the course of medication, you may find your blood glucose levels become slightly easier to manage. Following a healthy diet and meeting the recommended exercise guidelines will help to improve your chances of managing your blood glucose levels. Can drug induced diabetes be prevented? It may be possible to reduce the risk of developing diabetes by ensuring you to keep to a healthy lifestyle whilst you are on the medication. Being on smaller doses of the medication or shorter periods of time may help to reduce the likelihood of developing high blood sugar levels and diabetes. Doctors will usually try to put you on the smallest e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs Can Cause Severe Joint Pain, Fda Warns

Diabetes Drugs Can Cause Severe Joint Pain, Fda Warns

An entire class of diabetes drugs can cause severe and disabling joint pain, the Food and Drug Administration cautioned patients on Friday. The drugs, which include Januvia, Onglyza, Tradjenta and Nesina, are all in the same class and work by making more insulin available to the body. Januvia was the first approved in the U.S. in 2006. “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that the type 2 diabetes medicines sitagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin may cause joint pain that can be severe and disabling,” the agency said in a statement that uses the generic names of the drugs. “We have added a new Warning and Precaution about this risk to the labels of all medicines in this drug class, called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors.” The drugs are already linked with some potentially severe side-effects. Januvia, for instance, can cause a severe inflammation of the pancreas called pancreatitis that’s not only excruciating but that can be deadly. Onglyza has been linked with a higher risk of heart failure. “Patients should not stop taking their DPP-4 inhibitor medicine, but should contact their health care professional right away if they experience severe and persistent joint pain. Health care professionals should consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause of severe joint pain and discontinue the drug if appropriate,” the FDA said. FDA searched its database that has reports of potential drug side-effects. These side-effects can be caused by drugs, but not always. The FDA analysis suggests that people taking these particular diabetes drugs did have a higher risk of severe joint pain. “Patients started having symptoms from one day to years after they started taking a DPP-4 inhibitor. After the patients discontinued the DPP-4 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Pressure Drugs May Be Harmful For Some Patients

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Pressure Drugs May Be Harmful For Some Patients

Type 2 diabetes: blood pressure drugs may be harmful for some patients For some patients with type 2 diabetes, treatment with intense blood-lowering medication may do more harm than good. This is according to a new study published in The BMJ. For some patients with type 2 diabetes, antihypertensive medication may raise the risk of cardiovascular death. The researchers - including Mattias Brunstrm of the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Ume University in Sweden - found that antihypertensive drugs may increase the risk of cardiovascular death for diabetes patients with a systolic blood pressure under 140 mm/Hg. While almost 1 in 2 people in the US have high blood pressure , or hypertension , the condition affects around 2 in 3 Americans with diabetes, putting them at higher risk of stroke , heart disease and other cardiovascular problems. As such, people with diabetes are often prescribed medication to help lower blood pressure. The American Diabetes Association recommend a systolic blood pressure target of less than 140 mm/Hg for patients with type 2 diabetes - the most common form of diabetes - though a target of less than 130 mm/Hg is recommended for some patients, if it can be achieved safely. For their study, Brunstrm and his colleague Bo Carlberg, also of the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Ume, set out to investigate whether the effects of antihypertensive medication vary dependent on a patient's blood pressure prior to treatment. Increased cardiovascular death risk for some diabetes patients The team conducted a meta-analysis of 49 randomized controlled trials - involving a total of 73,738 participants - that looked at the cardiovascular outcomes of people with diabetes who were receiving blood pressure-lowering medication Continue reading >>

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

What are the types of oral diabetes medications? Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. α-glucosidase inhibitors Biguanides Sulfonylureas Meglitinides Thiazolidinediones DPP-4 inhibitors Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)-2 inhibitors These medications differ in the way they function in the body to reduce blood glucose. Metformin (Glucophage) is the only biguanide available in the United States and is generally the first choice for oral treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin improves Sulfonylureas are the oldest classes of oral diabetes medications. Sulfonylureas work primarily by stimulating the release of insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for regulating blood glucose by increasing the uptake of blood glucose by tissues and increasing storage of glucose in the liver. Meglitinides and sulfonylureas have a similar mechanism of action. Meglitinides are short acting glucose lowering medications. They stimulate the secretion of insulin from the pancreas. Thiazolidinediones enhance insulin sensitivity meaning that the effect of a given amount of insulin is greater. Thiazolidinediones also are referred to as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? or PPAR-? agonists. α-glucosidase inhibitors delay the digestion and absorption of starch or carbohydrates by inhibiting enzymes in the small intestine which help breakdown these molecules. The starches and carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which then is absorbed from the intestine and increases the level in the blood. DPP-4 inhibitors help lower blood glucose by increasing the production of insulin from the pancreas and reducing the release of glucose from the liver. SGLT2 inhibitors or sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 in Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drugs Cause Hypoglycemia?

Which Diabetes Drugs Cause Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia—aka low blood sugar—can kill you. The most common cause is medications taken by people with diabetes. DRUGS THAT RARELY, IF EVER, CAUSE HYPOGLYCEMIA Diabetics not being treated with pills or insulin rarely need to worry about hypoglycemia. That’s usually true also for prediabetics. Yes, some type 2 diabetics control their condition with diet and exercise alone, without drugs. Similarly, diabetics treated only with diet, metformin, colesevalam, sodium-glucose co-transport 2 inhibitor (SGLT2 inhibitor), and/or an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor (acarbose, miglitol) should not have much, if any, trouble with hypoglycemia. The DPP4-inhibitors (sitagliptan and saxagliptin) do not seem to cause low glucose levels, whether used alone or combined with metformin or a thiazoladinedione. Thiazolidinediones by themselves cause hypoglycemia in only 1 to 3% of users, but might cause a higher percentage in people on a reduced calorie diet. Bromocriptine may slightly increase the risk of hypoglycemia. GLP-1 analogues rarely cause hypoglycemia, but they can. DRUGS THAT CAUSE HYPOGLYCEMIA Regardless of diet, diabetics are at risk for hypoglycemia if they use any of the following drug classes. Also listed are a few of the individual drugs in some classes: insulins sulfonylureas: glipizide, glyburide, glimiperide, chlorpropamide, acetohexamide, tolbutamide meglitinides: repaglinide, nateglinide pramlintide plus insulin possibly GLP-1 analogues GLP-1 analogues (exanatide, liragultide, albiglutide, dulaglutide) when used with insulin, sufonylureas, or meglitinides possibly thiazolidinediones: pioglitazone, rosiglitazone possibly bromocriptine BECOME THE EXPERT ON YOUR OWN DRUGS If you take drugs for diabetes, you need to be your own pharmaceutical expert. Don’t depend solely Continue reading >>

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Statin drugs increase your likelihood of suffering exercise-related injury, according to a recent study, and the harmful effect increases with age Several recent studies have also concluded that statins can increase your risk of developing diabetes. One meta-analysis found that one out of every 498 people who are on a high-dose statin regimen will develop diabetes as a result of the drug, but the risk may be as high as one in 255 Statins provoke diabetes by raising your blood sugar- and insulin levels, and by robbing your body of certain valuable nutrients, such as vitamin D and CoQ10, which are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels Like thalidomide, statin drugs are a class X drug with regard to pregnancy, meaning they are contraindicated and should NOT be taken by pregnant women If you’re on a statin drug, you MUST take CoQ10 to alleviate some of the most dangerous side effects By Dr. Mercola Tens of millions of Americans are taking cholesterol-lowering drugs - mostly statins - and some "experts" claim that many millions more should be taking them, including children as young as eight. I couldn't disagree more. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, that is, they act by blocking the enzyme in your liver that is responsible for making cholesterol (HMG-CoA reductase). The enzyme that these drugs block is actually responsible for far more than making cholesterol. It also makes CoQ10 which is vital for your mitochondrial health. The fact that statin drugs cause side effects is well established - there are now 900 studies proving their adverse effects, which run the gamut from muscle problems to diabetes, to birth defects and increased cancer risk. Now you can add exercise-related muscle damage to the ever growing list of harmful side effects. Statins Can Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Diabetes

Drug-induced Diabetes

Many therapeutic agents can predispose to or precipitate diabetes, especially when pre-existing risk factors are present, and these may cause glucose control to deteriorate if administered to those with existing diabetes. They may act by increasing insulin resistance, by affecting the secretion of insulin, or both. For convenience, these agents may be subdivided into widely used medications that are weakly diabetogenic, and drugs used for special indications that are more strongly diabetogenic. Examples of the former include antihypertensive agents and statins, and examples of the latter include steroids, antipsychotics and a range of immunosuppressive agents. There are also a number of known beta cell poisons including the insecticide Vacor, alloxan and streptozotocin. Introduction A wide range of therapeutic agents may affect glucose tolerance, and the list of known or suspected drugs is lengthy. This entry summarizes evidence concerning the agents most frequently implicated. Widely used medications A number of drugs used to reduce cardiovascular risk also predispose to the development of diabetes. These include the thiazide diuretics, beta-blockers and statins. It should however be appreciated that these are commonly offered to individuals who are at increased risk of diabetes by virtue of risk factors such as obesity and hypertension, and that risk association does not necessarily mean causation. Thiazides: Thiazide diuretics revolutionized the treatment of hypertension in the 1960s, but were soon noted to increase the risk of diabetes[1]. Subsequent experience showed that that this risk is greatly reduced by low-dose therapy, whose benefits therefore outweigh its risks. The thiazides have a weak inhibitory effect upon release of insulin from the beta cell. This eff Continue reading >>

This Common Drug Causes Diabetes And Robs You Of Nutrients

This Common Drug Causes Diabetes And Robs You Of Nutrients

What Common Foods May Kill Multi-Drug Resistant Cancers? A recent meta-analysis has demonstrated that taking statin drugs is associated with excess risk of developing diabetes. Researchers looked at five different clinical trials that together examined more than 32,000 people. They found that the higher the dosage of statin drugs being taken, the greater the diabetes risk. According to the study, as reported by Green Med Info: "In a pooled analysis of data from 5 statin trials, intensive-dose statin therapy was associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes compared with moderate-dose statin therapy." This recent meta-analysis of five different drug trials adds further credence to suspicions that statins may be contributing to the current epidemic of adult-onset diabetes. Statins, as most of you probably know, are the most popular cholesterol-lowering drugs available today. They're primarily thought of as "preventive medicine" to reduce your risk of heart disease. Many doctors also prescribe them if you have elevated C reactive protein (an indication that you have chronic inflammation in your body), and they're even promoted for kids as young as eight years old! The fact that statin drugs cause side effects is well establishedthere are some 900 studies proving their adverse effects , which run the gamut from muscle problems to increased cancer risk . But as we're now starting to discover, statins may also cause diabetes... Statins Increase Risk of Diabetes Onset, Researchers Find The meta-analysis, published in JAMA in June , concluded that those taking higher doses of statins were at increased risk of diabetes compared to those taking moderate doses. What this means is that the higher your dose, the higher your risk of developing diabetes. The "number needed Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Medicationinduced Diabetes Mellitus

Medicationinduced Diabetes Mellitus

Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Corresponding Author: David R. Repaske, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA ( Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Corresponding Author: David R. Repaske, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA ( Please review our Terms and Conditions of Use and check box below to share full-text version of article. I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn more. Epidemiological studies and case reports have demonstrated an increased rate of development of diabetes mellitus consequent to taking diverse types of medication. This review explores this evidence linking these medications and development of diabetes and presents postulated mechanisms by which the medications might cause diabetes. Some medications are associated with a reduction in insulin production, some with reduction in insulin sensitivity, and some appear to be associated with both reduction in insulin production and insulin sensitivity. A variety of medications have been associated with development of diabetes. Establishing a precise cause and effect relationship between a medication and development of diabetes is challenging for several reasons. Side effects of most medications are rare and clinical studies of medications typically evaluate effectiveness and are not powered to evaluate side effects. Diabetes is a common disease and there is always a question of whether it would have developed if the person had not taken the medication in question. Patients are often taking multiple medications and so it is hard to determine w Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Impair Glucose Tolerance And Cause Diabetes Mellitus

Drugs That Can Impair Glucose Tolerance And Cause Diabetes Mellitus

Drugs that can impair glucose tolerance and cause Diabetes Mellitus Drugs that can impair glucose tolerance and cause Diabetes Mellitus There are over sixteen different classes of drugs that can affect the ability of the body to utilize glucose and or cause the body to become diabetic. Many people and physicians are often unaware of these risks when taking or prescribing medications, respectively. Here we will review some of the categories associated with this risk. Fluoroquinolones (medications ending in floxacin) are used to treat infections cause altered insulin secretion. The HIV anti-retrovirals that fall under the classes of protease inhibitors and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors can cause increased peripheral insulin resistance. Antipsychotic medications (chlorpromazine, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine,..) appear to involve increased insulin resistance and diminished insulin secretion. Cardiovascular classes of medications can promote worsening of diabetes. These medications include beta-blockers by decreased insulin sensitivity. Statins by impaired glucose tolerance. Thiazide diuretics by reduced total-body potassium, decreased insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance. Vasopressor medications (epinephrine and norepinephrine) used in the intensive care unit cause activation of glycogenolysis, increased hepatic gluconeogenesis, stimulation of glucagon an cortisol, and inhibition of insulin secretion. Glucocorticoids produce significant drug-induced hyperglycemia by increased hepatic glucose production, increased insulin resistance, and increased expression of peroxisome proliferator activated gamma receptors of which regulate fatty acid storage and glucose metabolism. Oral contraceptives with combination estrogen-progestogen can cause alte Continue reading >>

Can Cholesterol Drugs Cause Diabetes?

Can Cholesterol Drugs Cause Diabetes?

For every prescription drug that is developed and offers benefits to patients, there are those that also pose significant risks. Physicians must always weigh the benefits to risks in order to make informed decisions as to whether a particular medication should be used for treatment. Recent findings suggest statins, a class of prescription drug used to treat high cholesterol levels, increase the risk of developing diabetes. No one argues the fact that statins are able to prevent major cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients who have already experienced a previous cardiovascular episode and are very likely to experience another one. But there is cause for concern over the widespread use of statins in patients with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and the potential for these patients to eventually develop another disease, diabetes. What Do Statins Do Exactly? Elevated blood cholesterol levels, specifically LDL (the bad kind), have been shown to increase a person’s risk of heart attacks and stroke. By testing LDL levels in patients, a fairly accurate prediction can be made of future cardiac events. [1] As more research has been gathered on the role of LDL levels and heart disease, national guidelines have called for optimal LDL cholesterol levels to be lowered. Enter statins. Statins have the ability to block a critical step in the formation of LDL cholesterol within the liver, hence, the overall level of LDL in the blood drops. Because of this, statins are currently the most commonly-prescribed class of drug used to treat high cholesterol. Until very recently, statins were thought to be safe and well tolerated by patients, though some studies reported temporary memory loss that disappeared once medication was switched. Though there is al Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Drugs May Bring On Ketoacidosis

New Diabetes Drugs May Bring On Ketoacidosis

SGLT2 inhibitors, which are some of the newest diabetes drugs on the market, may increase the risk of a serious condition. A new study concludes that these medications actually double the likelihood of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Because diabetes is becoming more prevalent in the United States, the hunt for new and more effective medication is in full flow. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are the most recent additions to the list of available medicines. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce blood glucose levels by encouraging the kidneys to increase sugar excretion in urine. These drugs are often given in combination with other diabetes medications, such as metformin and insulin. The new class of drugs has become relatively popular, but the latest research finds that they could increase the risk of a serious diabetes-related complication. Rare but dangerous Diabetic ketoacidosis is relatively uncommon but potentially life-threatening. It occurs when acids called ketones build up in the body, increasing the acidity of the blood, or when the body does not produce enough insulin. When insulin is absent, glucose cannot enter cells and provide them with the energy they need. Therefore, the body falls back on its secondary fuel source: fat. Ketones are byproducts of burning fat. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include increased thirst, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, and confusion. It can also cause swelling in the brain, and, if left unchecked, can be fatal. Although diabetic ketoacidosis is more likely to occur in people with type 1 diabetes, it does occasionally appear in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Examining the interaction The new study, carried out by Dr. Michael Fralick and a team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, set out to examine Continue reading >>

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