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Drug Interaction Between Ranitidine And Metformin

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Ranitidine Hydrochloride (ranitidine Hydrochloride) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Ranitidine Hydrochloride (ranitidine Hydrochloride) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

OTC use is not recommended unless advised by a qualified health care prescriber. For the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). NOTE: While ranitidine may be effective in patients with less severe GERD, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) offer more rapid symptom relief and better healing. For short-term treatment (acute healing phase). 150 mg PO twice daily. Symptomatic relief usually occurs within 24 hours after starting therapy. Although higher doses of ranitidine have been studied (300 mg PO twice daily), doubling the standard dose not improve efficacy; if a standard dose is not effective, consider alternate therapy (e.g., PPI). 5 to 10 mg/kg/day PO, administered in 2 or 3 divided doses. Continue therapy for 6 to 8 weeks if improvement in symptoms is noted. For maintenance treatment (relapse prevention). 150 mg PO twice daily. The American College of Gastroenterology recommends that treatment be continued for as long as necessary to control symptoms and prevent complications. For the treatment of erosive esophagitis. For endoscopically diagnosed erosive esophagitis. 150 mg PO 4 times per day for up to 12 weeks. Symptomatic relief may begin within 24 hours of initiation of treatment. 5 to 10 mg/kg/day PO, administered in 2 or 3 divided doses. To maintain healing in erosive esophagitis after the initial treatment phase is complete. 150 mg PO twice daily. NOTE: Single doses administered prior to bedtime (i.e., 300 mg PO at bedtime) have been less effective than 150 mg PO twice daily. Placebo-controlled studies have been carried out for 48 weeks. Specific guidelines have not been established. For the treatment of pathologic GI hypersecretory conditions such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, systemic mastocytosis, or multiple endocrine adenoma syndrome. Initially, Continue reading >>

Effects Of Genetic Polymorphisms On The Oct1 And Oct2-mediated Uptake Of Ranitidine

Effects Of Genetic Polymorphisms On The Oct1 And Oct2-mediated Uptake Of Ranitidine

Effects of genetic polymorphisms on the OCT1 and OCT2-mediated uptake of ranitidine Roles Data curation, Investigation, Methodology, Writing original draft Affiliation Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen, Germany Affiliation Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen, Germany Roles Conceptualization, Writing review & editing Affiliation Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen, Germany Effects of genetic polymorphisms on the OCT1 and OCT2-mediated uptake of ranitidine Ranitidine (Zantac) is a H2-receptor antagonist commonly used for the treatment of acid-related gastrointestinal diseases. Ranitidine was reported to be a substrate of the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2. The hepatic transporter OCT1 is highly genetically variable. Twelve major alleles confer partial or complete loss of OCT1 activity. The effects of these polymorphisms are highly substrate-specific and therefore difficult to predict. The renal transporter OCT2 has a common polymorphism, Ala270Ser, which was reported to affect OCT2 activity. In this study we analyzed the effects of genetic polymorphisms in OCT1 and OCT2 on the uptake of ranitidine and on its potency to inhibit uptake of other drugs. We characterized ranitidine uptake using HEK293 and CHO cells stably transfected to overexpress wild type OCT1, OCT2, or their naturally occurring allelic variants. Ranitidine was transported by wild-type OCT1 with a Km of 62.9 M and a vmax of 1125 pmol/min/mg protein. Alleles OCT1*5, *6, *12, and *13 completely lacked ranitidine uptake. Alleles OCT1*2, *3, *4, and *10 had vmax values decreased by more than 50%. In contrast, OCT1*8 showed an increase of vmax by 25%. The effects of Continue reading >>

Dangerous Drug Interactions

Dangerous Drug Interactions

Larissa I. Velez, MD, FACEP, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Medical Toxicologist, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Sing-Yi Feng, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Medical Toxicologist, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Collin S. Goto, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Medical Toxicologist, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Fernando L. Benitez, MD, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Frank LoVecchio, DO, Emergency Medicine Department, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ. My emergency department (ED) has had an electronic medical record for the past two years. Part of that record includes a medication list that is created from past encounters and updated by the triage nurse. Because it is electronic and prints out nicely in the triage summary, it has the appearance of truth. My experience with the list is likely similar to some of yours: Patients are often taking medications not on the list and are not currently taking those that are. So, my caution to the residents before prescribing any new medication is to ask patients if they are currently taking any of the medications on the list or taking anything not listed. That way, we can minimize the potential for some for the dangerous drug interactions discussed in this review. Drug interactions have become more common because of the increased use of multiple prescription drugs, advancing age of the population, and the complexities of modern health care. For example, the average American adult who is 55 years old or older uses 6 to 9 medications daily.1 The high-profile deaths of artists and celebrities due to the use of medications and drugs have brought incredible atte Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Hca Ranitidine Oral And Cimetidine-metformin

Interactions Between Hca Ranitidine Oral And Cimetidine-metformin

Drugs & Medications HCA Ranitidine Tablet This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment. Moderate. These medicines may cause some risk when taken together. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information. When these two medicines are taken together, your kidneys may not be able to properly remove metformin from your blood. The effects of metformin may increase and cause your blood sugar to become too low or may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis.Symptoms of low blood sugar include chills, cold sweat, dizziness, drowsiness, shaking, rapid heartbeat, weakness, headache, fainting, tingling of the hands or feet, or hunger.Symptoms of lactic acidosis include feeling very weak, tired, or uncomfortable, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual or unexpected stomach discomfort, feeling cold, dizziness or lightheadedness, suddenly developing a slow or irregular heartbeat. What you should do about this interaction: Let your healthcare professionals (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) know that you are taking these medicines together. Your doctor may want you to check your blood sugar more often while taking them together. Your doctor may want to adjust the dosage of your metformin while you are taking cimetidine or if you stop taking cimetidine.Let your doctor know right away if you develop any signs or symptoms of lactic acidosis.Carry a source of glucose (such as glucose tablets or gel, table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda) with you to quickly raise your blood sugar level if it is too low. Let your doctor know that you are experiencing low blood sugar.Your health Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Of Metformin Involving Drug Transporter Proteins

Drug Interactions Of Metformin Involving Drug Transporter Proteins

Drug Interactions of Metformin Involving Drug Transporter Proteins Find articles by Rajkapoor Balasubramaniam 1Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. 2Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sebha University, Sebha, Libya. *Corresponding author: Naina Mohamed Pakkir Maideen, Tel: +97142164952, Fax: +97142244302, [email protected] Received 2017 Aug 2; Revised 2017 Sep 12; Accepted 2017 Sep 13. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, as long as the original authors and source are cited. No permission is required from the authors or the publishers. Metformin is a most widely used medication all around the world to treat Type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is also found to be effective against various conditions including, Prediabetes, Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), Obesity, Cancer, etc. It is a cationic drug and it depends Organic Cation Transporters (OCTs) and Multidrug and Toxin Extruders (MATEs) mostly for its pharmacokinetics movement. The probability of drug interaction increases with the number of concomitant medications. This article focuses the drug interactions of metformin and most of them are linked to the inhibition of OCTs and MATEs leading to increased plasma metformin concentrations and subsequent elevation of risk of Metformin Associated Lactic Acidosis (MALA). By identifying the drugs inhibiting OCTs and MATEs, the healthcare professionals can predict the drug interactions of metformin. Keywords: Metformin, Drug interactions, Organic Cation Transporters, Multidrug and Toxin Extruders, Pharmacokinetic interactions Metformin is a popular drug and is used by Continue reading >>

Interaction Of Rs316019 Variants Of Slc22a2 With Metformin And Other Drugs- An In Silico Analysis - Sciencedirect

Interaction Of Rs316019 Variants Of Slc22a2 With Metformin And Other Drugs- An In Silico Analysis - Sciencedirect

Interaction of rs316019 variants of SLC22A2 with metformin and other drugs- an in silico analysis Author links open overlay panel Abu AshfaqurSajib Open Access funded by Academy of Scientific Research and Technology Metformin is one of the first-line and most widely prescribed drugs to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D). Its clearance from circulation is mostly facilitated by SLC22A2 (OCT2) in the renal cells. SLC22A2 is a polyspecific organic cation transporter and mediate transport of structurally unrelated endogenous and exogenous compounds including many drugs. rs316019 (p.270A>S) is the most common variant of SLC22A2 with a frequency as high as 15% or more in many populations. The 270S form of SLC22A2 clears metformin from circulation at much reduced level compared to the 270A form. If accumulated, metformin increases plasma lactate level in a concentration-dependent manner which can lead to a condition known as metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA). MALA is a potentially life-threatening complication with a mortality rate of 3050%. Pre-existing clinical conditions, such as renal impairment, sepsis, anoxia, etc may make individuals more prone to MALA. In this study, we used computational approaches to investigate the effect of 270A>S change in SLC22A2 on interaction with metformin and other drugs. Based on the structural models, all substrates bind to the same pocket of SLC22A2. The substrates fit better to the binding site of 270A form of SLC22A2. The binding site has a few core interacting residues, among which SER358 appears to be the most important. It is an in silico prediction that the T2D patients, who are under metformin regimen, should be cautious in taking ranitidine (an over-the-counter sold drug) on a regular basis as it may lead to metformin associated Continue reading >>

Champix (varenicline Tartrate) Drug Interactions

Champix (varenicline Tartrate) Drug Interactions

CHAMPIX (varenicline tartrate) Drug Interactions Note: the information below includes the Part I: Health Professional Information. To access full product monograph, click here . Based on varenicline pharmacokinetic characteristics, and clinical experience to date, it appears unlikely that CHAMPIX would produce or be subject to clinically meaningful drug interactions. Drug interaction studies were performed with varenicline and: cimetidine, metformin, digoxin, warfarin, transdermal nicotine and bupropion. No clinically meaningful pharmacokinetic drug interactions have been identified, other than potential for interaction with cimetidine in patients with severe renal impairment (see Cimetidine, below). Drugs cleared by, or which affect, cytochrome P450 enzymes In vitro studies demonstrated that varenicline does not inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes (IC50 >6400 ng/mL). The P450 enzymes tested for inhibition were: 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4/5. Also, in human hepatocytes in vitro, varenicline did not induce the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2 and 3A4. Therefore, varenicline is unlikely to alter the pharmacokinetics of compounds that are primarily metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Furthermore, since metabolism of varenicline represents less than 10% of its clearance, drugs known to affect the cytochrome P450 system are unlikely to alter the pharmacokinetics of CHAMPIX (see ACTION AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY: Pharmacokinetics) and therefore a dose adjustment of CHAMPIX should not be required for these types of drugs. Drugs cleared by, or which affect, renal secretion In vitro studies demonstrated that varenicline does not inhibit human renal transport proteins at therapeutic concentrations. Therefore, drugs that are cleared by renal secretion ( Continue reading >>

Ranitidine And Metformin Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Ranitidine And Metformin Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Ranitidine and Metformin drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Ranitidine and Metformin together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Ranitidine and Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 3,086 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 3,086 people who take Ranitidine, Metformin are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle) Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Acute myocardial infarction (acute heart attack) Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure) Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells) Addison's disease (addison's disease, a hormonal disorder disease) Angina pectoris (chest pain due to ischemia of the heart muscle) Dehydration (dryness resulting from the removal of water) Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Hypoglycaemia (deficiency of glucose in the bloodstream) Hypoglycaemia (deficiency of glucose in the bloodstream) Respiratory failure (inadequate gas exchange by the respiratory system) Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness) Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit) Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis) Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by block Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Between Metformin And Zantac

Drug Interactions Between Metformin And Zantac

Interactions between your drugs Moderate ranitidine ↔ metformin Applies to:Zantac (ranitidine) and metformin Using metFORMIN together with raNITIdine may increase the effects of metFORMIN, which may lead to a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis This can cause weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting. Talk with your doctor before using metFORMIN while you are using raNITIdine. You may need a dose adjustment and you may need to check your blood sugar more often. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor. Drug and food interactions No results found in our database - however, this does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. Always consult with your doctor or pharmacist. Therapeutic duplication warnings No therapeutic duplications were found for your selected drugs. See Also Drug Interaction Classification The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply. Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Unknown No information available. Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclai Continue reading >>

Health A-z & Marijuana News

Health A-z & Marijuana News

DOES MARIJUANA INTERACT WITH PHARMACEUTICAL DRUGS? Pills vs Pot "Well-known brands of hay fever tablets, painkillers and sleeping pills pose a previously unknown threat to people’s health when taken together, British scientists claim." - The Telegraph The quick and dirty answer is YES. Marijuana can definitely interact - positively or negatively - with your medication. Until recently, Cannabis has been out of the loop, a non-option, for prescription by medical doctors. In depth knowledge about Cannabis based medicines interaction with prescription drugs is limited due to the herb's unfortunate stint (80 years) as an illegal drug. As such, most orthodox doctors have little experience or training in cannabis based medicines. However, many medical practitioners are equipped with the acumen and experience that will allow them to safely incorporate marijuana into their treatment regimes / repertoires. Cannabis based medicines are generally far less toxic than many pharmaceuticals and have fewer side effects, a fact that makes multiple-drug management including MMJ an easier task. "The drugs, including common allergy treatments Piriton and Zantac, as well as Seroxat, an antidepressant, are thought to be used by half of the 10 million over-65s in Britain. Many of the drugs, when taken in combination, were found to more than treble an elderly patient’s chance of dying within two years." - The Telegraph What's happening to folks and our elderly in particular, is downright scary. Gauging the exact effect of but one drug on an individual is a difficult task, let alone predict the interaction of a half a dozen medications taken simultaneously. Here is what a prominent medical doctor has to say. "The average person over 65 now uses seven different medications per day, four presc Continue reading >>

How Does Metformin Interact With Other Medications Or Foods?

How Does Metformin Interact With Other Medications Or Foods?

Medications that interact with metformin include digoxin, cimetidine, furosemide, nifedipine, amiloride, ranitidine, triamterene, morphine, quinidine, vancomycin, trimethoprim and procainamide. Taking metformin with other drugs that lower blood sugar can raise your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). This includes probenid, beta-blockers, sulfa drugs, salicylates, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Alcohol can also lower your blood sugar and increase the chances of developing lactic acidosis. Your risk of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be increased if you take metformin with other medications that increase blood sugar levels. Medications that raise your blood sugar are thyroid medications, steroids, isoniazid, diet pills, seizure medications, birth control pills, diuretics and phenothiazines. There may be other drugs, supplements or food that interact with metformin. People with diabetes should follow a diet and exercise plan. Because diabetes affects your blood sugar, diet is extremely important and you should discuss this with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Clinically And Pharmacologically Relevant Interactions Of Antidiabetic Drugs

Clinically And Pharmacologically Relevant Interactions Of Antidiabetic Drugs

Go to: Introduction Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often do not suffer solely from symptoms of increased blood glucose levels. In the majority of cases, several comorbidities are present with the need of additional pharmacological treatment. Concomitant diseases such as hypertension and high blood lipids can lead to both microvascular and macrovascular complications [Cornier et al. 2008]. Moreover, central nervous disorders such as depression are increased in patients with T2DM compared with the general population [Anderson et al. 2001]. Multifactorial pharmacotherapy significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality [Gaede et al. 2008], but an increasing number of medications taken by the patients leads to a higher risk of adverse drug effects and interactions [Freeman and Gross, 2012; Amin and Suksomboon, 2014; Rehman et al. 2015; Valencia and Florez, 2014; Peron et al. 2015]. Applying a multifactorial pharmacotherapy approach, it is important to consider cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzyme interactions [De Wildt et al. 1999; Dresser et al. 2000], altered absorption properties [Fleisher et al. 1999] and transporter activities [Lin and Yamazaki, 2003]. Furthermore, nutrition [Fleisher et al. 1999], herbal supplements [Rehman et al. 2015] and other parameters such as patient’s age and gender [Meibohm et al. 2002; Mangoni and Jackson, 2004] are of importance when the drug interaction risk of a pharmacological therapy is assessed. This article provides a short review of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of antidiabetic drugs and their clinically relevant interactions with common medications which are frequently used to treat diabetic comorbidities. Literature searches included PubMed and Scopus databases using the Medical Subject Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions With Metformin Oral And Ranitidine Hcl Oral

Drug Interactions With Metformin Oral And Ranitidine Hcl Oral

metformin oral and ranitidine hcl oral metformin oral will increase the level or effect of ranitidine hcl oral by nonacidic drugs competing for the same pathway through the kidney. ranitidine hcl oral and metformin oral ranitidine hcl oral will increase the level or effect of metformin oral by nonacidic drugs competing for the same pathway through the kidney. Check Now » Drug Interaction Categories Contraindicated Never use this combination of drugs because of high risk for dangerous interaction Serious Potential for serious interaction; regular monitoring by your doctor required or alternate medication may be needed Potential for significant interaction (monitoring by your doctor is likely required) Disclaimer: The information contained herein should NOT be used as a substitute for the advice of an appropriately qualified and licensed physician or other health care provider. The information provided here is for informational purposes only. This tool may not cover all possible drug interactions. Please check with a physician if you have health questions or concerns. Although we attempt to provide accurate and up-to-date information, no guarantee is made to that effect. Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended-release (metformin Hydrochloride) - Drug Interactions, Contraindications, Overdosage, Etc

Metformin Extended-release (metformin Hydrochloride) - Drug Interactions, Contraindications, Overdosage, Etc

DRUG INTERACTIONS Drug Interactions (Clinical Evaluation of Drug Interactions Conducted with Metformin Hydrochloride Tablets) Glyburide — In a single-dose interaction study in type 2 diabetes patients, co-administration of metformin and glyburide did not result in any changes in either metformin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. Decreases in glyburide AUC and Cmax were observed, but were highly variable. The single-dose nature of this study and the lack of correlation between glyburide blood levels and pharmacodynamic effects, makes the clinical significance of this interaction uncertain (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: Concomitant Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-release Tablets and Oral Sulfonylurea Therapy). Furosemide — A single-dose, metformin-furosemide drug interaction study in healthy subjects demonstrated that pharmacokinetic parameters of both compounds were affected by co-administration. Furosemide increased the metformin plasma and blood Cmax by 22% and blood AUC by 15%, without any significant change in metformin renal clearance. When administered with metformin, the Cmax and AUC of furosemide were 31% and 12% smaller, respectively, than when administered alone, and the terminal half-life was decreased by 32%, without any significant change in furosemide renal clearance. No information is available about the interaction of metformin and furosemide when co-administered chronically. Nifedipine — A single-dose, metformin-nifedipine drug interaction study in normal healthy volunteers demonstrated that co-administration of nifedipine increased plasma metformin Cmax and AUC by 20% and 9%, respectively, and increased the amount excreted in the urine. Tmax and half-life were unaffected. Nifedipine appears to enhance the absorption of metformin. Metformin h Continue reading >>

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