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Dropped My Glucose Meter

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) You can lose consciousness Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: Shaky Irritable Sweaty This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tablets or four to six pieces of hard candy). Hypoglycemia"My blood sugar was really plummeting" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You'll need to test your blood sugar to confirm that you're having hypoglycemiasome people become irritable if blood sugar is too high, so it's not always obvious. If you drink sugar-containing juice, or some other form of carbohydrate, it should bring blood sugar back into the normal range. You can also purchase glucose pills or gels in the pharmacy that can get blood sugar back on track. “You should always have a glucose source in the car,” says Yvonne Thigpen, RD, diabetes program coor Continue reading >>

Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose: The Use Of The First Or The Second Drop Of Blood

Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose: The Use Of The First Or The Second Drop Of Blood

Go to: Abstract There is no general agreement regarding the use of the first or second drop of blood for glucose monitoring. This study investigated whether capillary glucose concentrations, as measured in the first and second drops of blood, differed ≥10% compared with a control glucose concentration in different situations. Capillary glucose concentrations were measured in two consecutive drops of blood in the following circumstances in 123 patients with diabetes: without washing hands, after exposing the hands to fruit, after washing the fruit-exposed hands, and during application of different amounts of external pressure around the finger. The results were compared with control measurements. Not washing hands led to a difference in glucose concentration of ≥10% in the first and in the second drops of blood in 11% and 4% of the participants, respectively. In fruit-exposed fingers, these differences were found in 88% and 11% of the participants, respectively. Different external pressures led to ≥10% differences in glucose concentrations in 5–13% of the participants. We recommend washing the hands with soap and water, drying them, and using the first drop of blood for self-monitoring of blood glucose. If washing hands is not possible, and they are not visibly soiled or exposed to a sugar-containing product, it is acceptable to use the second drop of blood after wiping away the first drop. External pressure may lead to unreliable readings. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an important part of diabetes care. The purpose of SMBG is to provide a timely and reliable assessment of blood glucose concentrations in an individual in order to be able to make adequate decisions in relation to diet, exercise, and medication (1,2). There are several aspects concern Continue reading >>

How Can I Find Out If My Glucose Monitor Kit Is Accurate?

How Can I Find Out If My Glucose Monitor Kit Is Accurate?

So the first thing you need to know about meter accuracy, is that they are not accurate at all, even when they are working perfectly. Currently, here in the States, a meter only needs to be within 20% of a lab value for FDA approval. To put that into some kind of perspective, consider the following: • If your blood sugar is 100 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 80 and 120. • If your blood sugar is 200 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 160 and 240. • If your blood sugar is 300 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 240 and 360. • If your blood sugar is 400 mg/dL your meter could read anywhere between 320 and 480, a one hundred and sixty point spread. Now, none of this was meant to depress you. Test strips are getting better and better, especially the ones from the big names in the business such as OneTouch and FreeStyle. WaveSense strips are also frighteningly good too. But what I want you to understand is that if you test a single drop of blood with two strips in a row, you will not get the same answer each time—and that doesn’t mean something is wrong with your meter. Most meters come with a vial of test solution, which is fake blood with a set amount of sugar in it. You can use the test solution to make sure your meter is working within the normal operating range. You simply take a test just like you would test your blood sugar, but instead of lancing you finger and testing your blood you put a drop of test solution on the tip of your finger and test it. Each vial of test strips will have a range of expected results printed on it. So long as the test you took falls within those numbers, the meter is working normally. One important note, however, is that about half the meters available need to be coded to match each batch of test Continue reading >>

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes advocate and author Riva Greenberg has been on a "meter accuracy kick" lately — researching the heck out of this controversial topic. Very timely considering I've been seeing loads of expensive TV ads for Accu-Chek's new Nano meter, claiming that it's "23% more accurate" (!) Riva recently published a piece at the Huffington Post on why meter accuracy is both less, and more, critical than you might think. Truth is, she tells us, meter accuracy is only one part of a much larger story. A Guest Post by Riva Greenberg After being lucky enough to receive an iBGStar meter from Sanofi the day before its launch, I ran a few comparison tests between it and the Bayer Contour USB, which I'd been using the past two years, and discovered that the iBGStar consistently gave me a reading 20-25 points higher. So I took out all my meters. There were several, (Sanofi studies show most people use 4 meters on average) and I even ordered two new free meters from FreeStyle. I checked my blood sugar several times on my collection of 7 meters (some think I was a little obsessed) and saw it was rare when two meters gave me the same number! Given that I feel like my meter is my lifeline, I wanted to find out how meters work and why different meters give different results. I talked with a number of Chief Medical Officers, MDs and Medical Safety Officers at several meter manufacturers and I'm going to tell you what I learned in layman's terms. To better understand the science behind meter and strip technology, you can google "meter accuracy" for white papers and posts that would delight even the geekiest engineer. To better know how accurate your own meter is (in percentage terms), you can "check the package insert that comes with the strips and look online at prescribing information," sa Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

What To Do When Your Blood Sugar Levels Drop Too Low

What To Do When Your Blood Sugar Levels Drop Too Low

If you take insulin or diabetes medication, you may be at risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Without quick attention, hypoglycemia can lead to serious complications, so it’s important to know what to do if it happens to you. “In very severe cases, it can lead to seizures or loss of consciousness,” says Marilyn Tan, MD, an assistant professor of medicine, endocrinology, gerontology, and metabolism at Stanford Health Care. It's possible to have hypoglycemia but have no symptoms, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). On the other hand, symptoms can also come on rapidly. While symptoms vary from person to person, if you have mild to moderate low blood sugar you may: Feel shaky or jittery Sweat a lot Be very hungry Have a headache or be lightheaded Turn pale Have trouble concentrating Have heart palpitations Be irritable or combative Have blurred vision or see double “Some people feel tingling or numbness in their extremities too,” says Rodolfo Galindo, MD, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and director of the Hospital Diabetes Service at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West hospitals in New York City. Your Hypoglycemia Action Plan If you experience symptoms of hypoglycemia, it’s important to take action. Start with these steps: Test your blood sugar. If you recognize any of these symptoms and believe your blood sugar may be too low, the first step you should take is to test your blood sugar with your glucose meter, Dr. Tan says. Anything less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) is considered low blood sugar, according to the National Library of Medicine (NLM). However, target levels Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, can be a dangerous condition. Low blood sugar can happen in people with diabetes who take medicines that increase insulin levels in the body. Taking too much medication, skipping meals, eating less than normal, or exercising more than usual can lead to low blood sugar for these individuals. Blood sugar is also known as glucose. Glucose comes from food and serves as an important energy source for the body. Carbohydrates — foods such as rice, potatoes, bread, tortillas, cereal, fruit, vegetables, and milk — are the body’s main source of glucose. After you eat, glucose is absorbed into your bloodstream, where it travels to your body’s cells. A hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas, helps your cells use glucose for energy. If you eat more glucose than you need, your body will store it in your liver and muscles or change it into fat so it can be used for energy when it’s needed later. Without enough glucose, your body cannot perform its normal functions. In the short term, people who aren’t on medications that increase insulin have enough glucose to maintain blood sugar levels, and the liver can make glucose if needed. However, for those on these specific medications, a short-term reduction in blood sugar can cause a lot of problems. Your blood sugar is considered low when it drops below 70 mg/dL. Immediate treatment for low blood sugar levels is important to prevent more serious symptoms from developing. Explaining low blood sugar in layman's terms » Symptoms of low blood sugar can occur suddenly. They include: rapid heartbeat sudden nervousness headache hunger shaking sweating People with hypoglycemic unawareness do not know their blood sugar is dropping. If you have this condition, your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Why Can’t Meters Tell Me My Blood Sugar?

Why Can’t Meters Tell Me My Blood Sugar?

The 72nd American Diabetes Association scientific session took place a few weeks ago. More than 16,000 medical professionals, scientists, researchers, pharma industry representatives and some well-versed patients attended. The exhibition hall boasted one of the largest displays of new-to-market, and coming-to-market devices, technologies and other products to make managing diabetes easier, safer and more precise. But I, and you, are still checking our blood sugar on a glucose meter that’s allowed to be anywhere within 20 percent of the laboratory standard 95 percent of the time. What that means is when my meter says my blood sugar is 145 mg/dl (8 mmol/l) it might be — or, given the up to plus or minus 20 percent, it might be 113 mg/dl (6.2 mmol/l) or 173 mg/dl (9.6 mmol/l), or anywhere in between. In 2010 the FDA wrote, “Glucose meters are increasingly being used to achieve tight glycemic control despite the fact that these devices have not been approved for this use.” The article goes on to say that patients at home and those in clinical settings are using glucose meters that have not been approved as safe and effective. Nearly 26 million people have diabetes in the U.S. Nearly 80 million have pre-diabetes. While they don’t all use meters, meter accuracy is not limited to a small, exceptional group. Since within 10 years most people with pre-diabetes will go on to get Type 2 diabetes, meter accuracy will grow to affect up to a third of the nation. So while manufacturers keep adding bells and whistles to meters, and we’re on the launch pad for an artificial pancreas — where accuracy will be even more critical — why don’t I have a meter that gives me an accurate reading of my blood sugar? Think about it: would you buy a scale that’s 20 percent off? Yo Continue reading >>

Warning About Possible Meter Malfunction

Warning About Possible Meter Malfunction

Certain blood glucose meters manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care may not work properly if they have been dropped onto a hard surface, such as the floor. A warning to this effect was released by Abbott and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) earlier this month. The following blood glucose meter models, if manufactured after January 31, 2007, are affected by this announcement: If one of these meters is dropped, its display screen may become partially or totally blank, making it difficult or impossible to read blood glucose monitoring results, strip lot numbers, or the date. To reduce the chance of such damage occurring, Abbott advises that people keep their blood glucose meters in the cases that come with them. If a meter is dropped, the user should perform a meter display check (instructions for doing so are in the users guide that comes with the meter). If the display check reveals no problems with the meters display, the meter can be used. If a meters display is damaged, it should not be used, and customers can contact Abbott for a free replacement meter at (877) 844-4404. They can also call this number if they have any questions about their meter or need to find out when it was manufactured. For more information about this warning, including images of affected meters with functioning and malfunctioning displays, visit Abbotts online information page here . Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opi Continue reading >>

Using The First Drop Of Blood For Monitoring Blood Glucose Values In Critically Ill Patients: An Observational Study

Using The First Drop Of Blood For Monitoring Blood Glucose Values In Critically Ill Patients: An Observational Study

Using the first drop of blood for monitoring blood glucose values in critically ill patients: An observational study From: Department of Nursing, Government Medical College and Hospital, Sector 32, Chandigarh, India 1National Institute of Nursing Education, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India 2Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Unit, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India Correspondence: Dr. Sukhpal Kaur, Lecturer, National Institute of Nursing, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India. E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. Using the first drop or second drop of blood while measuring blood glucose (BG) values. The study was planned to compare the BG values from the first and second drops of blood. The study was conducted at the Main Intensive Care Unit, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India. Ninety patients aged 293 years were enrolled in this study. BG values from the first and second drops of blood were taken and compared. Agreement between two drops was assessed using BlandAltman analysis. A bias of <10 mg/dl was considered clinically acceptable. Linear regression of the mean difference (bias) with the BG readings was performed. One thousand four hundred and seven pairs of BG readings were taken from the enrolled patients. BG values had a bias of 3.9 14.9 mg/dl. Nearly 96.7% of BG readings were within the limits of agreement. The absolute diffe Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Use the chart below to help understand how different test results can indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes Fasting Blood Glucose Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Random Blood Sugar (taken any time of day with or without fasting) A1C Ideal Result Less than 100mg/dl Less than 140 mg/dl Less than 140 (even after eating a large meal) Less than 5.7% Pre-diabetes 100-125mg/dl 140-199mg/dl 140-200 5.7% to 6.4% Diabetes 126mg/dl and greater 200 mg/dl and greater 200 or greater 6.5% or more Q: I have been told that I have diabetes, or "pre-diabetes", or that I am in the "honeymoon period" . My readings are all over the place: sometimes in the 120's, others in the 90's, sometimes, but rarely in the 150-170's. My doctor does not want to put me on medication yet. I exercise regularly and am not overweight though my diet is variable. I certainly like sweets, pizza, and pasta. What is the long term effect of these continued high blood sugar levels? A: Firstly, kudos for your physician for giving diet/lifestyle changes a chance to work. Reduction of body fat often is the first best start. This may or may not be true in your case but certainly sweets, pizza, etc. are affecting your numbers. If you can discipline yourself at this time to eat unrefined foods and be more active, your beta cells that produce insulin may get the rest they need to become efficient again. Our diabetes management booklet has many referenced foods/supplements that may help to stabilize your glucose levels. In time, your favorite foods may be reintroduced in moderate amounts. You appear to be more in the pre-diabetes range at this time. Complications are a long process. If your daytime levels stay under 120-140, that is good. Fasting levels are higher due to hormonal activity nighttime; these levels are a much sl Continue reading >>

Checking Your Blood Sugar

Checking Your Blood Sugar

If you have diabetes, a single drop of blood can speak volumes. When placed on a test strip and fed into a blood sugar meter, that little drop can tell you whether, at that moment, your sugar level is too high, too low, or just about right. You can also get an important glimpse into the future. If your blood sugar is too high for too long, you could be at risk for long-term complications such as blindness, heart disease, and amputations. By testing your blood sugar regularly, you can track the effectiveness of your medication, make informed decisions about meals and exercise, and head off problems such as high blood sugar or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) before it's too late. Checking blood sugar is an easy process, but it's possible to go astray. If you skip tests, don't record the information properly, or misuse the meter, your sugar levels could still be a mystery. Your doctor or diabetes educator can help you avoid these traps. Be sure to ask plenty of questions, and don't stop until you feel ready to measure your sugar levels on your own. Different patients have different needs, but some basic tips apply to everyone. When should I check my blood sugar? Your diabetes educator or your doctor can help you set your schedule. According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, most patients on insulin have to check their blood sugar several times a day. You may also need to do daily monitoring if you are newly diagnosed with diabetes, if your blood sugar is not well-controlled, or if you're making major changes in your food intake or energy expenditure that could influence your blood sugar. If any of these applies to you, you may want to check your blood sugar once in the morning, an hour before each of the three major meals, and right before bedtime. Your doctor may also suggest Continue reading >>

6 Things That Can Cause Your Blood Sugar To Spike Or Drop

6 Things That Can Cause Your Blood Sugar To Spike Or Drop

While roller coasters can be thrilling at amusement parks, theyre not so great when it comes to your blood sugar levels. Also known as glucose, blood sugar is a critical source of energy for your body, according to the Mayo Clinic . When its either too high or too low, you can feel pretty terribleespecially if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes . Heres a quick primer on how blood sugar works in people with and without diabetes. You absorb sugar from food and beverages into your bloodstream, where insulin (a hormone from your pancreas) helps it gets into your cells to provide energy, according to the Mayo Clinic . As a backup of sorts, your liver also makes and stores its own glucose to help keep your blood sugar within a normal range. In general, when you dont have diabetes, your body does a good job of regulating glucose levels, Amisha Wallia, M.D., an endocrinologist at Northwest Memorial Hospital, tells SELF. But if you have type 1 diabetes, which typically appears in childhood or adolescence, your pancreas produces little or no insulin to help glucose get into your bodys cells, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). That can allow too much sugar to build up in your bloodstream (hyperglycemia). If you have type 2 diabetes, which usually develops in adults, you experience high blood sugar because your pancreas either doesnt make enough insulin or your body cant use insulin properly, according to the NIDDK . When your blood sugar gets over 200 milligrams per deciliter, it can cause symptoms like headaches, fatigue, increased thirst, and frequent urination, per the Mayo Clinic . On the flip side, problems managing your diabetes can also result in glucose levels that swing in the opposite direction and become too low ( Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Sometimes my blood glucose monitor seems to give incorrect readings. What can I do to make sure the measurement is accurate? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. When used correctly, blood glucose monitors — small devices that measure and display your blood sugar level — are usually accurate. But occasionally they may be incorrect. Consider these factors that affect meter accuracy and the steps to resolve or prevent the problem: Factors that affect accuracy Solutions Test strip problems Throw out damaged or outdated test strips. Store strips in their sealed container; keep them away from heat, moisture and humidity. Be sure the strips are meant for your specific glucose meter. Extreme temperatures Keep your glucose meter and test strips at room temperature. Alcohol, dirt or other substances on your skin Wash and dry your hands and the testing site thoroughly before pricking your skin. Improper coding Some meters must be coded to each container of test strips. Be sure the code number in the device matches the code number on the test strip container. Monitor problems Fully insert the test strip into the monitor. Replace the monitor batteries as needed. Not enough blood applied to the test strip Touch a generous drop of blood to the test strip. Don't add more blood to the test strip after the first drop is applied. Testing site location If you're using a site other than your fingertip and you think the reading is wrong, test again using blood from a fingertip. Blood samples from alternate sites aren't as accurate as fingertip samples when your blood sugar level is rising or falling quickly. The amount of red blood cells in your blood If you are dehydrated or your red blood cell count is low (anemia), your test results may be less accurate. Blood glucose monitor quality Continue reading >>

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