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Driving With Diabetes Guidelines

In The Spotlight: Driving With Type 1 Diabetes

In The Spotlight: Driving With Type 1 Diabetes

When a teen with type 1 diabetes is training to get his or her license, learning safe driving involves more than just pointers on parallel parking or correctly using turn signals. Managing blood sugar while behind the wheel is a serious safety issue for both the driver him- or herself and everyone else on the road. Is your teen ready to combine the responsibilities of good diabetes management with operating a motor vehicle? Your diabetes care team can help you with this question, as well as offer guidance on precautions to take. It’s a big step for parents to hand over the keys, but with type 1 in the mix, it can seem more like a giant leap. Check out these road-tested tips to help your child make the transition to the driver’s seat. A Different Kind of Driver’s Test Jaclyn A. Shepard, Psy.D., is a licensed pediatric psychologist and assistant professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. In addition to working with families and children coping with type 1 diabetes, she also helped develop the UVA-run Diabetes Driving study, an ongoing research project whose mission is to understand how drivers with type 1 can better prevent, detect and treat out-of-range blood sugar levels when driving. According to Shepard, feeling anxious about your teenager with diabetes learning to drive is normal, mainly because it goes with the territory of parenting a child who is rapidly becoming a young adult. “Parental worry is common as children gain independence and start spending more time away from home, which undoubtedly happens more when teens obtain their driver’s licenses,” she says. To help your child stay safe and keep worry and anxiety manageable, Shepard recommends parents begin communicating expectations and rules about driving and diabetes management be Continue reading >>

Official Dvla Guidelines For Insulin/driving

Official Dvla Guidelines For Insulin/driving

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Official DVLA guidelines for insulin/driving diamondnostril Type 1 Well-Known Member Is anybody able to provide a link to an official and up-to-date set of guidelines from the DVLA for drivers on Insulin? I've been searching on the gov.uk site today and cannot find such a thing. I found the instructions what to do to inform the DVLA that you have diabetes, and instructions for how to fill out the DIAB1 form etc etc. But what I'm missing is the official DVLA guidelines on what you must do for each time you drive. I've found several leaflets and printouts from Diabetes and Healthcare organisations which state their guidelines, but these do not constitute the official word from DVLA. I'm thinking that there must be an official document - can anyone point me to it? There's a box on the second page of the official DIAB1 form that you are required to sign and date that states "I have insulin treated Diabetes and I understand the need to test my blood sugar/glucose as times relevant to driving (not more than 2 hours before the start of the journey and every 2 hours while driving)." @diamondnostril , @CapnGrumpy - I'll admit that I cannot find anything written by the DVLA that says "5mmol/l before you drive", or that anything <4mmol/l means a hypo... EDIT to add - I've emailed the DVLA asking them to provide a source of the aforementioned information, not from a 3rd party. Should hear back within 3 working days @GrantGam1337 I've never seen any bs numbers officially given by DVLA either - just references to hypoglycaemia or severe hypoglycaemia. Perhaps they consider that to be a medical definition and therefore outside their scope. There is a single PDF shee Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

Of the nearly 19 million people in the U.S. with diagnosed diabetes (1), a large percentage will seek or currently hold a license to drive. For many, a driver's license is essential to work; taking care of family; securing access to public and private facilities, services, and institutions; interacting with friends; attending classes; and/or performing many other functions of daily life. Indeed, in many communities and areas of the U.S. the use of an automobile is the only (or the only feasible or affordable) means of transportation available. There has been considerable debate whether, and the extent to which, diabetes may be a relevant factor in determining driver ability and eligibility for a license. This position statement addresses such issues in light of current scientific and medical evidence. Sometimes people with a strong interest in road safety, including motor vehicle administrators, pedestrians, drivers, other road users, and employers, associate all diabetes with unsafe driving when in fact most people with diabetes safely operate motor vehicles without creating any meaningful risk of injury to themselves or others. When legitimate questions arise about the medical fitness of a person with diabetes to drive, an individual assessment of that person's diabetes management—with particular emphasis on demonstrated ability to detect and appropriately treat potential hypoglycemia—is necessary in order to determine any appropriate restrictions. The diagnosis of diabetes is not sufficient to make any judgments about individual driver capacity. This document provides an overview of existing licensing rules for people with diabetes, addresses the factors that impact driving for this population, and identifies general guidelines for assessing driver fitness and de Continue reading >>

Driving And Type 1 Diabetes

Driving And Type 1 Diabetes

Having diabetes is not an issue for driving but the fact that you are using medication that leaves you at risk of hypoglycaemia means you must take extra precautions and you must inform the National Driver Licence Service. Drivers are advised to take the following precautions: • You must always carry your glucose meter and blood glucose strips with you. You must check your blood glucose before the first journey and every two hours whilst you are driving. • In each case if your blood glucose is 5.0mmol/l or less, take a snack. If it is less than 4.0mmol/l or you feel hypoglycaemic, do not drive and take appropriate action to correct glucose level. • If hypoglycaemia develops while driving, stop the vehicle as soon as possible. • You must switch off the engine, remove the keys from the ignition and move from the driver’s seat. • You must not start driving until 45 minutes after blood glucose has returned to normal. It takes up to 45 minutes for the brain to recover fully. • Always keep an emergency supply of fast-acting carbohydrate such as glucose tablets, lucozade or sweets within easy reach in the vehicle. • You should carry personal identification to show that you have diabetes in case of injury in a road traffic accident. • Particular care should be taken during changes of insulin regimens, changes of lifestyle, exercise, travel and pregnancy. • You must take regular meals, snacks and rest periods on long journeys. Always avoid alcohol. Hypoglycaemia Hypoglycaemia (also known as a hypo) is the medical term for a low blood glucose (sugar) level. Severe hypoglycaemia means that the assistance of another person is required. The risk of hypoglycaemia is the main danger to safe driving and this risk increases the longer you are on insulin treatment. Th Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes does not mean you cannot drive a car or a motorbike. Given that your diabetes is well controlled, and your doctor states that you are safe to drive, there is no reason why you cannot have a driving licence or hang on to your existing licence. Nonetheless, you may need to let your car insurance company and the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) know that you have diabetes depending on your type of diabetes and how it is controlled. You should also keep up to date with the latest DVLA guideline changes to driving with diabetes. Who do I need to inform about my diabetes? No matter how your diabetes is treated, you must by law inform your insurance company that you have diabetes. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you must inform the DVLA. If you are applying for a driving licence for the first time, and your diabetes is treated with tablets or insulin, you also must inform the DVLA. In addition: You must inform the DVLA if any diabetes complications develop that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you fail to inform the DVLA or your insurance company then your driving insurance will be invalid. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by diet alone or by tablets that do not bring on hypoglycemia. However, if you change from tablets to insulin treatment, then they must be informed. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by: Diet alone By tablets which carry no risk of hypoglycemia Non-insulin injectable medication such as Byetta or Victoza (unless you are also on tablets which do carry a risk of hypos) Tablets which are deemed to carry a risk of hypoglycemia are sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Unless you have other complications or reasons that may affect your ability to drive. For informatio Continue reading >>

Guideline For Driving With Diabetes

Guideline For Driving With Diabetes

VIEW PDF Driving safely is more than just watching where you are going; it’s also watching where your blood sugar is going. People taking insulin are at risk for low blood sugar reactions. Even mild hypoglycemia (60-70 mg/dl) may be enough to interfere with your judgement and driving. Create a Driving Contract for Your Teen with Diabetes Driving Contract Points Agree to test blood glucose at least 4 times a day before meals and bedtime. Agree to contact the office for insulin adjustments if you are having patterns of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Come to your diabetes appointments as recommended by your endocrinologist. Before getting behind the wheel, check your blood sugar. If it is less than 100, take some carbohydrate. Don’t start the car until your blood sugar is at least 100. Check your blood glucose every hour while on the road. Keep your meter and glucose tablets with you at all times, and always have glucose tablets available in the car. If you feel low while driving, you must pull over and treat yourself until you are over 100. Carbohydrate sources must be easily accessible. If you will be on the road for a while (vacations, etc), think ahead and have food available in case you get stuck in traffic or don’t have access to food on the road. Wear a medical alert bracelet or neck charm. If you become hypoglycemic despite your precautions, erratic driving may cause an accident or bring you to the attention of the police. Without identification, an officer or medical personnel may assume you are drunk or on drugs. A wallet card may not be found until it’s too late. No one advocates taking away the licenses of people with diabetes, but driving is a responsibility and a privilege, not a right. You agree that we reserve the right to hold off on filling out DM Continue reading >>

Driving And Type 2 Diabetes

Driving And Type 2 Diabetes

Having diabetes is not an issue for driving but if you are taking medications that leave you at risk of hypoglycaemia you must take extra precautions and you must inform the National Driver Licence Service. CHECK WITH YOUR PHARMACIST IF YOUR MEDICATIONS LEAVE YOU AT RISK OF HYPOGLYCEAMIA e.g. Insulin or Sulphonylureas such as Gliclazide (Diamicron®) or generic versions such as Diabrezide, Diaglyc, Diacronal MR, Diaclide MR, Gliclazide, Zycron MR.or the post prandial regular Nateglinide (Starlix®). If you are not at risk of hypoglycaemia you do not need to inform the National Driver Licence Service (NDLS). Medicine regimes change therefore remember to tell the NDLS if you start any of the medications that increase the risk of hypoglyceamia. Drivers at risk of hypoglycaemia are advised to take the following precautions: • You must always carry your glucose meter and blood glucose strips with you. You must check your blood glucose before the first journey and every two hours whilst you are driving. • In each case if your blood glucose is 5.0mmol/l or less, take a snack. If it is less than 4.0mmol/l or you feel hypoglycaemic, do not drive and take appropriate action to correct glucose level. • If hypoglycaemia develops while driving, stop the vehicle as soon as possible. • You must switch off the engine, remove the keys from the ignition and move from the driver’s seat. • You must not start driving until 45 minutes after blood glucose has returned to normal. It takes up to 45 minutes for the brain to recover fully. • Always keep an emergency supply of fast-acting carbohydrate such as glucose tablets, lucozade or sweets within easy reach in the vehicle. • You should carry personal identification to show that you have diabetes in case of injury in a road tra Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Assessing Fitness To Drive

Diabetes Mellitus: Assessing Fitness To Drive

✘- Must not drive ! - May continue to drive subject to medical advice and/or notifying the DVLA ✓- May continue to drive and need not notify the DVLA Diabetes mellitus Insulin-treated drivers are sent a detailed letter from the DVLA explaining the licensing requirements and driving responsibilities. All drivers with diabetes must follow the information provided in ‘Information for drivers with diabetes’, which includes a notice of when they must contact the DVLA (see Appendix D). Insulin-treated diabetes Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia The Secretary of State’s Honorary Medical Advisory Panel on Driving and Diabetes has defined impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia for Group 1 drivers as ‘an inability to detect the onset of hypoglycaemia because of total absence of warning symptoms’. Group 2 drivers must have full awareness of hypoglycaemia. ‘Severe’ is defined as hypoglycaemia requiring another person’s assistance. Group 1 Car and motorcycle Group 2 Bus and lorry ! - Must meet the criteria to drive and must notify the DVLA. All the following criteria must be met for the DVLA to license the person with insulin-treated diabetes for 1, 2 or 3 years: ■ adequate awareness of hypoglycaemia ■ no more than 1 episode of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding 12 months ■ practises appropriate blood glucose monitoring as defined below ■ not regarded as a likely risk to the public while driving ■ meets the visual standards for acuity and visual field (see Chapter 6, visual disorders). ! - Must meet the criteria to drive and must notify the DVLA. All the following criteria must be met for the DVLA to license the person with insulin-treated diabetes for 1 year (with annual review as indicated last below): ■ full awareness of hypoglycaemia ■ no episo Continue reading >>

Problems With The Eu Guidelines For Driving With Diabetes

Problems With The Eu Guidelines For Driving With Diabetes

Problems with the EU guidelines for driving with diabetes are emerging following a nurse winning back her driving license back after it was previously revoked by the DVLA. Helen Nichols, 26, has type 1 diabetes. After admitting two night-time events of hypoglycemia to the DVLA which required assistance from someone else, she lost her license. This is due to the 2011 EU guidelines which were implement following changes made to the EU law in August 2009. Under the new guidelines, these two hypos would be penalised, despite Helen’s control being otherwise exemplary. “I would be the first person to give up my driving licence if I was unsafe and constantly having hypos that I was unaware of because I mean no harm to others,” said Helen. Despite having no driving accidents while driving – she has managed her type 1 with insulin for 18 years – EU guidelines prevent the DVLA from distinguishing between conscious episodes of hypoglycemia and nocturnal hypoglycemia, which is much harder to manage. Helen originally published her frustration on the Diabetes.co.uk Forum, before setting up a petition. After losing her license in October 2014, her campaign eventually led to it being reinstated in April this year. “I hope that my case can be used by others now to demonstrate that other factors should be taken into account before a driving licence is suspended, unless there are concerns or any doubts from the patients’ GP or Consultant”. However, concerns from health care teams may not be accurate if a 2014 study is to be believed, which found fewer type 1 diabetes patients were reporting severe hypoglycemia to their health teams. Alongside the DVLA, doctors receive a form which, combined with your own information, formulates the basis of whether you will be allowed to d Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Diabetes And Private And Commercial Driving

Guidelines For Diabetes And Private And Commercial Driving

Diabetes & You > Healthy Living Resources > General Tips > Guidelines for Diabetes and Private and Commercial Driving Guidelines for Diabetes and Private and Commercial Driving Each province has its own rules regarding glucose (sugar) control and being able to drive. The following recommendations were published in the June 2003 issue of the Canadian Journal of Diabetes. You can also download and view the complete article entitled, Canadian Diabetes Associations Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes and Private and Commercial Driving . Diabetes may affect driving performance due to chronic complications, which may impair sensory or motor function (diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney disease (nephropathy), cardiovascular disease (CVD), peripheral vascular disease and stroke) and because of incidents of hypoglycemia. As the presence and extent of these factors vary from person to person, the Canadian Diabetes Association maintains the following position on Driving and Licensing: People with diabetes have the right to be assessed for a license to drive a motor vehicle on an individual basis in accordance with Canadian Diabetes Association guidelines for private and commercial driving. In assessing the suitability of people with diabetes to drive, medical evaluations are needed to document any complications and to assess blood glucose (sugar) control, including the frequency and severity of any hypoglycemic incidents. Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose (sugar) levels. Hypoglycemia can adversely affect driving performance and may contribute to some of the accidents that involve people with diabetes. The risk of severe hypoglycemia is greatest in people with type 1 diabetes who are using intensive insulin therapy (IIT), especially those Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result. Check with your nurse or doctor if you don’t know what type of medication you’re on. Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving a car or motorbike with diabetes. Diabetes treated by insulin Car or motorbike licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. You can also fill in form DIAB1 and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. Fill in form VDIAB1I and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE). Diabetes treated by tablets or non-insulin injections Car or motorbike licence Check with your doctor or nurse to find out if your treatment means you need to tell DVLA. If you do need to tell DVLA, fill in form DIAB1 and send it to the address on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections. You must fill in: form VDIAB1SG if your diabetes is treated by sulphonylurea or glinide tablets form VDIAB1GEN if your diabetes is treated by any other tablets or non-insulin injections Send the form to DVLA. The address is on the form. Diabetes treated by diet Car or motorbike licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Bus, coach or lorry licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Continue reading >>

Revised Assessing Fitness To Drive Guidelines 2016 Released

Revised Assessing Fitness To Drive Guidelines 2016 Released

Revised Assessing Fitness to Drive guidelines 2016 released Revised Assessing Fitness to Drive guidelines 2016 released For the past few years there has been great concern about the national guidelines being used to assess fitness to drive for people with diabetes. Diabetes Australia and our state and territory member organisations have led the way on advocating changes to these guidelines on behalf of all people with diabetes to make sure they only address aspects directly affecting someones ability to drive. We are very pleased to advise that, from 1 October 2016, revised and clearer guidelines will help Australians with diabetes and their healthcare teams decide if it is safe to drive. Diabetes Australia has worked closely with diabetes specialist clinicians and researchers in the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) and credentialled diabetes educators in the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) and together we have advised and collaborated with the National Transport Commission (NTC) to make the guidelines fairer and safer for people with diabetes. The old guidelines used a persons average blood glucose measurement over a three-month period (the HbA1c measurement) to determine if their diabetes management was adequate to indicate they were safe to drive. This number was only ever intended as a guide for doctors, but unfortunately many people with diabetes had their licences suspended because this guide measurement was interpreted strictly. Diabetes Australia has successfully advocated for the removal of references to HbA1c from the guidelines and we are very pleased Austroads has made these changes. Diabetes Australia also strongly advocated to maintain the guidelines emphasis on the immediate measurement of blood glucose level using test strips (or conti Continue reading >>

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

In this article we will explore what it takes to get a commercial driver’s license with diabetes, and how to get an insulin waiver for Type 1 and Type 2 persons who use insulin. We will look at requirements for Type 1 vs. Type 2 diabetes. We will look at insulin vs. non-insulin users. We will look at state vs. interstate CDL requirements. We will also look at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) diabetes waiver program, and how you can be evaluated to drive a commercial vehicle across state lines when you have diabetes and use insulin. Intrastate guidelines for CDL with diabetes If you want to work in the trucking industry only within your state, and you do not plan to cross any state lines, you can get approved to drive a commercial vehicle in your state. For drivers driving within state lines, you do not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Likewise, you would not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if you do not use insulin. Whatever rules and regulations your state has for holding a CDL with diabetes is what you have to follow for intrastate or interstate trucking. It is important to know that most commercial driving will be considered interstate, not intrastate driving, even if you do not cross state lines. If you are carrying cargo or passengers to or from another state, this is also considered as interstate commercial driving. For information on intrastate commercial driving, check with your home state for CDL requirements and see if they are applicable to you. They vary from state to state, with each state having its own regulations. You can look up the laws governing your state by visiting this page at the American Diabetes Association website, You can type your home state in the search for laws and requirements fo Continue reading >>

Driving & Your Rights

Driving & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada’s position on driving? People with diabetes have the right to be assessed for a license to drive a motor vehicle on an individual basis in accordance with Diabetes Canada guidelines for private and commercial driving. Read the Diabetes Canada's full position statement on driving and licensing, including background and rationale. What are Diabetes Canada's recommendations for private or commercial drivers? In October 2015, the Clinical and Scientific Section of the Diabetes Canada published Diabetes and Driving: 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association Updated Recommendations for Private and Commercial Drivers. I have been diagnosed with diabetes. Can I keep driving? Most likely. In consultation with your doctor, a decision will be made as to whether you are medically fit to drive. In assessing the suitability of people with diabetes to drive, medical evaluations document any complications and assess blood glucose (BG) control, including the frequency and severity of any hypoglycemic incidents. Diabetes and its complications can affect driving performance due to: Impaired sensory or motor function Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Kidney disease (nephropathy) Cardiovascular disease (CVD) Peripheral vascular disease and stroke Incidents of hypoglycemia Motor vehicle licensing authorities can require licensed drivers to be examined for their medical fitness to drive. You should not have difficulty obtaining and maintaining an operator’s license if you: Properly manage your diabetes; Are able to recognize and treat the early symptoms of hypoglycemia; and Do not have complications that may interfere with your ability to drive. Do I have to report diabetes to the motor vehicle licensing authority? Yes. As a rule, anyone applyin Continue reading >>

Driving While Diabetic

Driving While Diabetic

A lawyer examines the patchwork laws governing people with diabetes and licenses to drive. According to a recent Associated Press report, a Portsmouth, New Hampshire driver needed to be subdued with a taser after hitting several cars in a parking lot and refusing a patrolman’s instructions to stop. The driver, who had diabetes, appeared to have been suffering a hypoglycemic episode. Fortunately, the officer recognized this, as did the responding fire department EMT. The man was given emergency I.V. treatment, stabilized, and taken to the hospital. He was not charged with breaking the law. Portsmouth Deputy Chief Corey MacDonald, released this statement on the incident: “Upon initial review, though the incident is regrettable for all involved, the officer appears to have used reasonable non-lethal force to end a potentially dangerous situation. Our police officers are not paramedics. They are charged with bringing dangerous situations under control. This driver could just as easily have been under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or engaging in willful criminal conduct.” Fire Chief Steve Achilles also offered his own statement: “It is not uncommon for diabetics in that condition to be combative or angry, making responses by emergency officials ‘challenging.’” Hypoglycemic impairment is not the only hazard that can complicate driving. Other potential complications of Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes include vision impairment and neuropathy leading to loss of feeling in the feet and hands, for example. New Hampshire currently has no law concerning driving with diabetes. However, using my skills as a retired lawyer, I uncovered some 30 states with laws on the books addressing the question of non-commercial driver’s licences for people with diabetes. Als Continue reading >>

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