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Dot Physical A1c Guidelines 2017

New Cdl Requirements Could Pull Drivers Off The Road

New Cdl Requirements Could Pull Drivers Off The Road

New CDL requirements could pull drivers off the road New CDL requirements could pull drivers off the road Meadville, Pennsylvania - If you have a commercial drivers license, a CDL, some big changes are on the way that could take some drivers off the road. Department Of Transportation passed new regulations that significantly increases medical requirements for commercial drivers. Anyone who possesses a commercial drivers license, or CDL, will be required to pass strict new medical requirements. This could result in some drivers not being re-certified. The new regulations will apply to school bus drivers, transit drivers, truck drivers or anyone who transports people for any kind of compensation. Steve Marshall is the safety and compliance officer for the Crawford Area Transit Authority and says some drivers may be surprised when it comes to getting re-certified. Health problems like diabetes, sleep apnea, and high blood pressure will now be a cause not to re-new a CDL license. Those health problems that might not have mattered in the past, will now The new stricter health regulations go into effect May 21st Copyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. WASHINGTON (AP) - The trial of President Donald Trump's onetime IRVINE, Calif. (AP) - Simone Manuel won the 50-meter freestyle, MATI, Greece (AP) - Fire officials in Greece raised the death toll Continue reading >>

10 Things Commercial Drivers Need To Know About The New Dot Regulations

10 Things Commercial Drivers Need To Know About The New Dot Regulations

On November 13, 2017, the Department of Transportation (DOT) published a final rule that changes its drug testing program regulation. The rule was added to meet new Health and Human Services (HHS) drug testing guidelines, and to help combat the opioid epidemic. Some of these changes may have a big impact on drivers and service agents like collectors, labs, TPAs, and MROs, so its important to stay informed and learn about them if you havent already. Heres a list of 10 things you need to know about the new regulations. The new testing standards went into effect on January 1, 2018. The main feature of the new rule is that four semi-synthetic opioids have been added to the testing panel: hydrocodone, oxycodone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone. The DOT removed MDEA from the drug test panel and added MDA in its place. 4. Impact on Third-Party Administrators (TPAs) The employer or TPA is no longer required to submit blind specimens to laboratories. This is intended to relieve unnecessary costs and administrative burdens. The collector will discard the employees urine sample if they dont provide the necessary amount by the end of the three-hour wait period. This modifies the shy bladder procedure. HHS-certified labs need to alter the drug testing panels to include the four new opioids and replace MDEA with MDA. Theyll need to modify the reports provided to employers and the DOT to reflect the panel changes. Labs will also add three more reasons as to why a specimen could be reported as rejected for testing: (1) there is no Custody and Control Form (CCF); (2) two separate collections were performed using one CCF; and (3) there was no specimen submitted to the lab with the CCF. 7. Impact on Medical Review Officers (MROs) Several of the MRO drug test review processes were modified Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes in trucking: Three things you need to know Tom Milam, CEO of health care provider TrueLifeCare, will tell you that there are three things motor carriers and their drivers need to know about diabetes and how it impacts the trucking industry: There's a 50% higher occurrence of diabetes in truck drivers than the national average; Drivers with diabetes can apply for a medical waiver with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to allow them to operate a commercial vehicle, as long as they meet its specific criteria; Yet while the use of insulin is no longer a complete barrier to being able to operate a commercial vehicle on the road, a driver must be able to prove they are maintaining stable blood sugars; not an easy task. Managing diabetes on one's own is a daunting task. Add to that the high mobility of truck drivers and it's nearly impossible, Milam explained to Fleet Owner. Thats where companies like ours come into play; developing diabetes management programs for employers who have high incidences of diabetes in their workforce, he added. We coach drivers via telephone about ways to manage their disease and stabilize blood sugars in order to keep them healthy and on the road. Milam said there are two key facts fleets need to keep in mind diabetes: First, that there is no cure and, second, diabetes is progressive, meaning that as symptoms worsen, the disease causes more harm to your body, especially without attentive personal management. The most immediate impact for drivers with diabetes is losing their jobs, he stressed. Truck drivers can lose their ability to drive if they require insulin to manage their disease, an almost automatic do not certify condition, Milam said. Today, nearly 20% of all people with diabetes use insulin therapy. While Continue reading >>

Why The A1c Test For Drivers?

Why The A1c Test For Drivers?

Understanding your blood sugar level is important for your CDL and your long-term health Land Line contributor Suppose a driver goes in for a DOT exam and his/her urine specimen indicates sugar “spilling” on the routine test. What does this mean? The normal kidney can hold up to a 300 mg percent rise in blood sugar without spilling sugar into the urine. If sugar is detected in that urine specimen, here’s what happens next. Usually, a medical examiner will order a “finger stick” to determine the blood sugar level. If the test comes back with a reading of 160 mg percent or higher, then the driver is diagnosed with new onset diabetes mellitus or uncontrolled diabetes that needs better treatment. Such a diagnosis can lead to loss of a professional driver’s DOT medical card or a three-month medical card. The driver must see his doctor – if he has one – and be treated or have his medication adjusted. Then the driver must demonstrate to the DOT examiner (soon to be “certified medical examiner”) that his blood sugar is being treated. It must also be demonstrated that the driver is compliant with follow-up and is taking medication for his disease. Here is where the A1C test is going to be a life-changer for professional drivers. The number that most of us DOT medical examiners look for is an average blood sugar of 160 or less. But how do we find the average blood sugar when we have only three months to demonstrate compliance? The answer is a test called “hemoglobin A1C.” This test measures the glucose found in the red blood cells. It just so happens that the human red blood cell lives for 120 days, so we can measure the sugar in it. DOT medical examiners now have either instant A1C in office test or, at worst, a two- to three-day send-out test. The good n Continue reading >>

A1c Levels For Truck Drivers

A1c Levels For Truck Drivers

I recently saw the following question: I am a truck driver who was diagnosed with type 2. What is an acceptable level when it comes to the A1c? My reply: What level of A1C is “acceptable” depends on who you ask According to the American Diabetes Association’s Glycemic Targets for Adults With Diabetes, people with diabetes should be to aim for an A1C below 7.0%. The ADA points out that lowering A1C below or around 7.0% has been shown to reduce both microvascular and macrovascular complications. Another organization, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, says the goal should be an A1C at or below 6.5% “for healthy patients without concurrent illness and at low hypoglycemic risk” and above 6.5% for other folks. The ADA agrees with AACE that the targets should be individualized based on Age/life expectancy Comorbid conditions Diabetes duration Hypoglycemia status Individual patient considerations Known CVD/advanced microvascular complications so that goals should be more stringent (<6.5%) if there’s Short diabetes duration Long life expectancy No significant CVD and less stringent (<8%) if Severe hypoglycemia history Limited life expectancy Advanced microvascular or macrovascular complications Extensive comorbidities Long-term diabetes in whom general A1C target difficult to attain Since you have type 2 diabetes, and if you are not taking insulin or sulfonylurea medications, your risk of hypoglycemia would seem to be fairly low. Therefore, you should be able to get your A1C down below 7.0% and perhaps below 6.5% without risking severe hypos. Of course, discuss your goals with your doctor or diabetes nurse educator! Notice, the guidelines quoted above say nothing about adjusting A1C goals based on occupation, or the risk of hypoglycemia while on- Continue reading >>

Fmcsa Regulations

Fmcsa Regulations

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has a list of frequently asked questions on their website. You can find FMCSA FAQ at this link Please read through Trucker Docs™ Q&A before posting a question. This will help everyone to not have duplicate questions. Thank you! If you still can’t find a related answer, then you are welcome to ask your question in the comments section below. Q&A Where can I get the new DOT physical / medical examination forms? Which drivers are required to have a DOT medical certificate? Does a DOT medical card have to be obtained in the same state as the CDL is from? I have a CDL and have been notified to present DMV with a medical certificate or I will lose my driving privileges. I’m not currently driving and may not drive again. Do I need to get a DOT physical just to maintain my license? Is the DOT medical card transferrable or do I have to get a new one when I start a new job? Is there a difference between a DOT medical certificate and a DOT physical card? What are the DOT physical requirements? Does the DOT physical exam include a drug test? Can I get a copy of my DOT physical long form or will I have to take another physical? What do I do if my medical card gets lost or damaged? Do I need a medical card if I’m a local driver? What’s involved in a DOT physical examination? Who can I go to to get my DOT physical exam done? What is a waiver or exemption and how can I get one? For how long is my medical certificate valid? My medical certificate only expires in nine months. What if I recently developed a medical condition that I couldn’t drive. Can I drive truck again now? Can my Company have different medical requirements than the FMCSA requirements? Can my new employer make me get a DOT physical even if my current medical ce Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Protocol

Blood Sugar Protocol

Do you need to get your blood sugar or A1C under control quickly for a DOT physical, or more importantly to get and stay healthier? If so the following 2 protocols will get blood sugar numbers back into the normal range faster than any other method. I highly recommend that you get a blood glucose meter and start checking your own blood sugar, both fasting and after meals. Here is the device I recommend, it can also check for blood ketones with the proper strips. Here are the DOT rules for blood sugar: All drivers diagnosed with diabetes must bring a printed copy of their most recent hemoglobin A1C from his or her primary care physician. This lab value must be 10% percent or less and be done within the last 6 months. The driver will receive a one year certificate if cleared. If the A1C levels are between 10-12% then the driver will receive a 3 month certificate. If, after 3 months, the new AIC levels are 10% or less at the end of the 3 months, the driver will receive a 9 month certificate based on the previous physical exam. If they are higher than 10% the driver will not receive a card. If the driver does not have the lab results available or his or her urine is positive for sugar, a random blood test (RBT) will be done. If this is 250 or less the driver will receive a 3 month certificate in which he should see his primary care physician and obtain an AIC lab. Once he or she returns with the report and it is less than 10% then 9 months will be added to your medical certification expiration date. There will be an additional charge for the provider to review the driver’s records and labs. If a driver has never been diagnosed with diabetes and a random blood test is greater than 250, the driver will not receive a medical certificate and will need to return with A1C for a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Concern | Truckersreport.com Trucking Forum | #1 Cdl Truck Driver Message Board

Diabetes Concern | Truckersreport.com Trucking Forum | #1 Cdl Truck Driver Message Board

Sorry if this is not the proper place to ask this but it seemed the most appropriate. I am preparing to take my very first DOT Physical and I have Type 2 Diabetes, it is controlled with diet and medication. I do not require insulin. My "normal" is in upper 100's, sometimes creeps up in to the lower 200's. The issue is that I have not had blood work done in almost a year, a lot has changed and I lost my medical coverage when I lost my job last year. Luckily I have went to the same doctor for a very long time and she has kept my prescriptions current to help me out. I read that most physicians will want to review your latest blood work results to check your A1C, if it is not available they will do a standard finger prick blood test and base their decision off that. Has anyone experienced this with their physical, having diabetes of course? I also read that some physicians will take your daily log of your own finger prick tests, I do check my sugar a couple of times a day and keep very accurate records of the results. Anyone use this for that part of the physical? Sorry if this is not the proper place to ask this but it seemed the most appropriate. I am preparing to take my very first DOT Physical and I have Type 2 Diabetes, it is controlled with diet and medication. I do not require insulin. My "normal" is in upper 100's, sometimes creeps up in to the lower 200's. The issue is that I have not had blood work done in almost a year, a lot has changed and I lost my medical coverage when I lost my job last year. Luckily I have went to the same doctor for a very long time and she has kept my prescriptions current to help me out. I read that most physicians will want to review your latest blood work results to check your A1C, if it is not available they will do a standard finge Continue reading >>

Dot Physical - The Complete Guide

Dot Physical - The Complete Guide

What New Truck Drivers Need To Know About The DOT Physical: In order to drive a commercial vehicle in the U.S. with a maximum gross vehicle weight rating of over 10,000 lbs in interstate commerce , drivers are required to pass a physical examination given by a DOT-approved medical examiner to obtain and maintain a medical examiner's certificate. Drivers receive a medical certification which is normally valid for 2 years. Your medical exam will be transmitted and stored electronically in the Commercial Driver's License Information System (CDLIS). Please note that some drivers who have problems meeting the requirements for the Diabetes, Vision, Hearing, or Physical Impairment parts of the DOT physical can be eligible for a Driver Exemption Program Drivers will be required to submit a "self-certification" to their state driver's licensing agency (SDLA), to declare their intent to drive commercially in 1 of 4 possible categories. This information will be added to the driver's CDLIS record. Under the recently enacted FAST Act, military veterans will be allowed to have their DOT physical done by a qualified physician through the Veteran's Administration, rather than National Registry ME's. CMV driver examinations can only be completed by Certified Medical Examiners (MEs) listed on the FMCSA’s National Registry. On This Page: You will be asked about your medical/health history, including whether you've had the following: Loss of hearing Digestive problems Psychiatric disorders Dizziness or fainting Alcohol/Drug Use Missing limbs Spinal cord injuries Impaired vision Kidney disease Stroke Chronic pain Paralysis Brain injuries or neurological disorders, Epilepsy or seizures Heart attack or heart disease Respiratory (breathing) Conditions Drivers will be required to certify that Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure And Hypertension

Blood Pressure And Hypertension

Please read through the Q&A before posting a question. This will help everyone to not have duplicate questions. Thank you! If you still can’t find a related answer, then you are welcome to ask your question in the comments section below. Q&A What are the blood pressure requirements to pass the DOT physical? Can I get a DOT medical card if I have hypertension? What if I’m on blood pressure medication? What if I don’t normally have high blood pressure, but I have “white coat syndrome”? What are the blood pressure requirements to pass the DOT physical? Here are the medical guidelines according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs). Note that employers are allowed to impose more stringent medical requirements. A driver with a BP of less than 140 / 90 may be medically certified to drive for a two-year period. A driver with a BP of 140 – 159 systolic and /or a BP of 90-99 diastolic, has stage 1 hypertension, and may be medically certified to drive for a one-year period. Certification examinations should be done annually thereafter and should be at or less than 140/90. A driver with a a BP of 160-179 systolic and/or a BP of 100-109 diastolic, has stage 2 hypertension, and is a candidate for antihypertensive drug therapy. The driver is given a one-time certification of three months to reduce his or her blood pressure to less than or equal to 140/90. Provided treatment is well tolerated and the driver demonstrates a BP value of 140/90 or less, he or she may be re-certified for one year from the date of the initial exam. The driver is certified annually thereafter. A driver with a BP at or greater than 180 systolic and / or 110 diastolic has stage 3 hypertension and is disqualified. The driver may not be qualified, even temporarily, until blood pres Continue reading >>

News Dedicated To A Healthy Workplace

News Dedicated To A Healthy Workplace

The Department of Transportation (DOT) Medical Examination is very highly regulated as illness complications can have serious consequences for the driver, the examiner, and the general public. DOT medical guidelines outline the health criteria that commercial vehicle drivers must meet to qualify for certification. One health condition that is closely reviewed by the DOT is diabetes. Individuals with known or suspected diabetes are required to provide specific medical information to the DOT-certifying physician regarding diabetic control. The DOT definition of diabetic control often causes confusion for individuals seeking certification, as well as their employers. The following information provides answers to common questions and clears up misconceptions about diabetes and DOT certification. The maximum certification for a person with diabetes is one year. According to DOT guidelines, a person with diabetes, whether controlled with diet alone or diet plus medication, must meet the following criteria: Maintain a glycosylated hemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C or “HBA1C”) of 8% or less. The HBA1C is a measure of the average amount of sugar in the blood over the last 3 months. A normal HBA1C is less than 5.7%. Values between 5.7 and 6.4% are classified as being in the pre-diabetic range. These individuals should be closely monitored. If the level is above 6.4%, then the person is diabetic. The HBA1C correlates very well with end organ (blood vessels, nerves, kidneys, heart, or eyes) damage and therefore is a popular marker for disease control. Red blood cells have a lifespan of about 90 days before they are removed by the spleen. Glucose sticks to the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Therefore, the glycosylated hemoglobin can be a good estimate of the average blood sugar and is Continue reading >>

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) adapted medical guidelines that diabetic truck drivers must meet. They are part of the requirements for obtaining an interstate Commercial Driver’s License (CDL). At one point in time, a truck driver with diabetes had to prove they have had diabetic episodes for three years to qualify for the diabetic exemption program. Since the diabetic exemption program was revised, this qualification no longer applies. Read below to find out what the new DOT regulations mean for prospective truck drivers with diabetes. Changing DOT regulations for diabetic truck drivers The first diabetic exemption program was established in 2003. It contained a long list of stipulations that made it hard for diabetic truck drivers to qualify for their CDL. This kept many capable truck drivers from employment with interstate trucking companies. One of the main DOT regulations hindering diabetic drivers from qualifying for the exemption program was the three-year rule. The three-year rule stated truck drivers with diabetes must have a record of driving for three years without a diabetic episode, and must have been on insulin for that time. It prevented nearly all potential drivers with diabetes from meeting the old DOT regulations. Between 2003 and 2005, only four exemptions were granted to diabetic truck drivers. On November 8, 2005, the FMCSA overturned some of the rules stated in the 2003 diabetic exemption program. The agency made vital changes, opening the road to more diabetic truck drivers. The FMCSA started accepting applications for the revised diabetic exemption program on September 22, 2005. Implementing changes in the DOT program for diabetic truck drivers The 2005 DOT regulations for the Continue reading >>

Dot Physical Exam – Guidebook

Dot Physical Exam – Guidebook

Worried about getting your DOT Medical Certificate? Anxious about the DOT Physical Examination? Concerned about the appointment? Will you pass or fail? Will you need to go back for further evaluation? Stressed about conditions like diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, and what this means for your future as a commercial driver? Not sure where to find a DOT doctor? (New Federal regulations state that after May 21, 2014, CMV drivers can get medical certificates only from a National Registry Certified Medical Examiner) Here’s What You Need To Know: When you know the rules you’ll be able to get your DOT Medical Certificate with as few hassles as possible. How to be on the “same page” as the doctor, and relate the demands of your job to the physical examination. Everything you need to bring to your appointment so you can get it done right, first time. What to expect so there are “no surprises” during the DOT Physical Examination. What additional information to bring if you have/had a medical condition that has restrictions. How to go about getting the required information from your primary care physician, if necessary. Understand the Medical Certificate qualification periods, and where you fit in. What about waivers and exemptions. Where to go if you still need more answers. Find a Certified Medical Examiner that’s convenient for you. Allen & Rita, OTR drivers, WA. As a team driving for Landstar we found this booklet a great help to prepare for our DOT physicals. We definitely recommend this booklet to any driver, especially new drivers who have not had a DOT physical yet! It helped to know what to expect and what we needed to bring with us. Know Before You Go! Eliminate The Hassles! Don’t go to your DOT Physical Exam before you’ve read this guidebook. Prepa Continue reading >>

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

In this article we will explore what it takes to get a commercial driver’s license with diabetes, and how to get an insulin waiver for Type 1 and Type 2 persons who use insulin. We will look at requirements for Type 1 vs. Type 2 diabetes. We will look at insulin vs. non-insulin users. We will look at state vs. interstate CDL requirements. We will also look at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) diabetes waiver program, and how you can be evaluated to drive a commercial vehicle across state lines when you have diabetes and use insulin. Intrastate guidelines for CDL with diabetes If you want to work in the trucking industry only within your state, and you do not plan to cross any state lines, you can get approved to drive a commercial vehicle in your state. For drivers driving within state lines, you do not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Likewise, you would not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if you do not use insulin. Whatever rules and regulations your state has for holding a CDL with diabetes is what you have to follow for intrastate or interstate trucking. It is important to know that most commercial driving will be considered interstate, not intrastate driving, even if you do not cross state lines. If you are carrying cargo or passengers to or from another state, this is also considered as interstate commercial driving. For information on intrastate commercial driving, check with your home state for CDL requirements and see if they are applicable to you. They vary from state to state, with each state having its own regulations. You can look up the laws governing your state by visiting this page at the American Diabetes Association website, You can type your home state in the search for laws and requirements fo Continue reading >>

Truck Drivers With Diabetes – How High Is Too High?

Truck Drivers With Diabetes – How High Is Too High?

Sites all across the internet are showing that qualification for a CDL truck driver requires a blood sugar reading of less than 200. I would like for someone, anyone, to provide me with the link to the regulation that actually shows this to be the case. According to the FMCSA under Part § 391.41, an applicant is qualified to operate a Commercial Motor Vehicle if he or she : “Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring insulin for control.” Again, we must note that truck drivers requiring insulin may still be able to drive under the Federal Diabetes Exemption Program. Nowhere in the regulations, that I can find, does it specifically state that a commercial truck driver’s blood sugar must be under 200. Many sites report that the 200 minimum is listed on the CDL Medical Examination Report, which I found to be false as well. According to Barnes Care, an occupational medicine facility, new DOT Medical Guidelines went into effect on September 30th, 2004. They note that a CMV driver’s blood sugar reading must: Maintain a fasting blood sugar of 140 or below or . . . Maintain a 2 hour postprandial blood sugar of 200 or less or . . . Maintain glycosylated hemoglobin of 8 percent or less Word has it that the FMCSA will be moving away from the urinalysis test for sugar and will be going to the A1C blood testing. Currently, the American Diabetes Association recommends an A1C reading of under 7% for those with diabetes, but actual guidelines for the CDL truck driver has not been established. The “normal” range for blood sugar is typically 70-100 fasting and not over 135-140 after a meal. Still, actual blood sugar levels required for CMV qualifications are not listed anywhere within the Federal Motor Carrier Regulation Continue reading >>

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