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Dosage Of Chromium Picolinate For Diabetes

Chromium Picolinate Facts

Chromium Picolinate Facts

Chromium picolinate is a nutritional supplement and chemical compound sometimes used as an alternative treatment for type 2 diabetes. But chromium picolinate has also stirred up chatter on popular health programs regarding how it works in the body for losing weight. How effective is it really for weight loss? In this review we are looking into the NOW brand of Chromium Picolinate. According to Everyday Health, chromium picolinate works with insulin in the body to metabolize carbohydrates. It's made by combining chromium with picolinic acid. The acid helps the body absorb chromium. [1] Many multivitamins do contain some chromium, and it is also sold as an over-the-counter supplement. Because chromium is a trace mineral in the human body, a large dosage is not needed. According to the Institute of the National Academy of Sciences, daily intake is recommended at 200 micrograms (mcg). Unfortunately, chromium content in foods can be affected by both agricultural and processing variables, so the best science can give is general guidelines. But they do agree relatively good sources can be found in meat, whole-grain products, fruits, vegetables, and some spices. Foods high in simple sugars, in contrast, are low in chromium. [6] Chromium deficiency in the body is rare, so the supplement has not gained support in the weight-loss world. Also, there really aren't any studies which have shown it to be particularly effective in aiding weight loss. At best, it may serve as a moderate appetite suppressant. There are also warnings: chromium picolinate should not be taken if you are pregnant or nursing, or if you have a history of liver disease, kidney disease, diabetes with insulin injections, thyroid disorder, or mental illness of any kind. Always reach out to your doctor before takin Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chromium

Diabetes And Chromium

Chromium is of interest to people with diabetes as it has been suggested that Chromium Picolinate could be particularly suitable for lowering blood sugar levels . Supplements are increasingly becoming recognised as having a place in the management and treatment of diabetes. However, each separate naturally occurring or manufactured supplement will affect different people in different ways. Chromium is an essential mineral. Chromium may potentate insulin, and is usually lost in processed foods . What does Chromium have to do with diabetes? According to some studies, Chromium Picolinate can have a significant effect on diabetes. According to an Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Vermont: Prior human studies have suggested that chromium picolinate decreases insulin levels and improves blood sugar metabolism in both obese people and people with type 2 diabetes . Richard Anderson, of the US Department of Agriculture, seconded the positive assessment of Chromium: Essentially all the studies using chromium picolinate supplementation for impaired glucose intolerance and diabetes showed a positive effect. Is there an upper limit for Chromium Supplementation? According to the American IOM (Institute of Medicine), following an extensive review of scientific literature about chromium picolinate, there is no reason to set an upper limit (UL) for Chromium. In theory, this means that there are no substantive safety concerns about chromium. So, as a diabetic, should I be taking chromium? This remains uncertain, although medical research lends support to the idea that chromium can be useful. Dr. Byron Hoogwerf of the Cleveland Clinic Heart Centre, said: Routine use of chromium supplementation in diabetic patients who have overall adequate nutrition has not consistently sh Continue reading >>

How Calcium, Magnesium And Chromium Can Benefit Diabetics

How Calcium, Magnesium And Chromium Can Benefit Diabetics

How Calcium, Magnesium and Chromium Can Benefit Diabetics If you have been following my Real Diabetes Truth blog posts, you will already know that eating sensibly, in a way that helps to keep your blood sugar levels stable, is a basic lifestyle strategy for managing diabetes, be it type 1 or type 2. The key factor, as Ive explained, is controlling your intake of carbohydrates and, above all, those with high glycaemic load (GL) values. But that isnt the end of the story when it comes to nutritional influences on blood sugar. There are three key mineral nutrients that you also need to know about they are calcium, magnesium and chromium. Calcium is best known for keeping bones strong, but it actually has many other roles in the body. A study published in January this year, involving more than 8,000 people, confirmed earlier findings that those people with the most calcium in their diets have the lowest risk of developing metabolic syndrome. In an earlier, placebo-controlled trial involving 20 non-diabetic patients with high blood pressure, taking a supplement of 1,500 mg of calcium per day for eight weeks was found to improve insulin sensitivity. A narrow range of calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration within the cell is critical for processes that involve the hormone insulin. The best food sources of calcium are dairy products, tinned fish (with bones), tofu, nuts, seeds, dried beans and leafy greens. It makes sense to eat these foods on a regular basis, but if you are unable to get your calcium this way, I would recommend a supplement of 1,000 mg a day, preferably as calcium citrate, which is more easily absorbed than calcium carbonate. Magnesium also appears to play a significant role in insulin sensitivity. A review published in Diabetes Carelast year concluded that higher Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Chromium Picolinate For Weight Loss, Diabetes & More

Benefits Of Chromium Picolinate For Weight Loss, Diabetes & More

Chromium is what is known as an essential trace mineral. It is essential because it is involved in the critical metabolism of macromolecules and is involved in insulin signaling pathways. The picolinate portion is what Chromium is bound to and is it the picolinate portion that gives the Chromium some special properties, especially when compared to dietary chromium. Picolinic acid helps to make the Chromium portion of the supplement more stable and it acts to increase its bioavailability (meaning the amount that your body can use). Chromium bound to picolinic acid (picolinate) helps increase the absorption and therefore utility of chromium. Scientists know that Chromium is essential, but they don't completely understand how it works. Because of this we actually don't have any way to accurately determine if someone is deficient in Chromium . The reason for this has to do with how little we understand the complex role of Chromium in the body. We have isolated out certain ways that chromium helps by reverse engineering studies and by looking at obviously deficient patients, but there still isn't a good way to determine if patients are suffering from minor deficiencies or sub-optimal levels. We know that rats fed a diet depleted in Chromium present with dysregulated blood sugar and insulin signaling and we also know that patients with type II diabetes have 20-40% lower blood chromium levels and 40-50% chromium levels measured in scalp hair when compared to healthy adults and controls . Obviously this promotes a challenge when we discuss the importance of Chromium and when we talk about supplementation! So with that in mind we really need to discuss how or why people would be deficient in Chromium to begin with. And the answer to this question has to do with diet: We have tw Continue reading >>

Chromium For Diabetes Type 2 - Usage, Benefits And Effects

Chromium For Diabetes Type 2 - Usage, Benefits And Effects

Dietary supplements have been recognized as an important weapon to counteract the symptoms as well as causes of type 2 diabetes ; not only by practitioners of alternative medicine but also by mainstream medical physicians. Functional medicine practitioners have also been using supplements to reduce the stress of side effects of prescription anti-diabetic drugs that cause both short-term and long-term health complications due to removal of vital nutrients from the body. Chromium has garnered a lot of interest, in recent times, with people with diabetes type 2 as it has been reported that chromium picolinate has been found to lower blood glucose levels. Chromium is an essential mineral that helps insulin regulate blood sugar level in our body. All metabolic reactions of chromium are insulin dependent. Adequate chromium consumption decreases our requirement of insulin and improves our blood lipid profile. Chromium is used by the body to make Glucose Tolerance Factor, a biologically-active compound that enhances activity of insulin by as much as three times. This activity has led to studies that show the importance of chromium for diabetes type 2. What Does Research Say About Chromium and Diabetes? The earliest study that showed the effect of chromium supplementation in decreasing symptoms of diabetes was done in the 1970s, when a patient was given supplemental chromium . Within two weeks, the patient showed distinct improvement in signs and symptoms, blood sugar levels improved and insulin requirements were greatly reduced. These and many other studies implicated chromium as a critical cofactor in insulin action. In a study with Chinese subjects with Type 2 Diabetes, patients that received a chromium picolinate diabetes dosage of 500 micrograms (g) twice per day of chromi Continue reading >>

Chromium: Cause Of Cancer Or Miracle Cure?

Chromium: Cause Of Cancer Or Miracle Cure?

Chromium: Cause of Cancer Or Miracle Cure? According to some reports, chromium picolinate can lower insulin requirements. In fact, some people swear by it, and there are athletes that take more than 800 mcg of the substance every day. Unfortunately, there remains the question of whether over-the-counter chromium pills are safe. Some researchers affiliated with the FDA fear that taking chromium supplements could increase the risk of cancer. However, R. Keith Campbell, RPh, CDE, says that chromium is not a panacea. The New York Times recently reported that an FDA study showed chromium did indeed cause chromosome damage in human cells in lab tissue. Critics of the study argue that the results were misleading, since the levels administered in the research were higher than what a person would be exposed to under normal conditions. Mark F. McCarty, research director of chromium distributor Nutrition 21, says, The doses associated with chromosome damage were 3,000 times the recommended amount. Thats 60,000 mcg of chromium a day, and I dont think anyone would want to take that much. Data presented about this in the popular press was totally misleading. The recommended daily allowance for chromium is 50-200 mcg per day, but Diane Sterns, a researcher involved in the FDA study, says that chromium accumulates in the body, which means that over time a person could be exposed to such high levels. Chromosome damage has been shown to cause cancer. Says Campbell, While no one would say at this point that chromium causes cancer, since it has shown chromosome damage, the risk is possible. In a 1993 issue of DIABETES HEALTH, S. Robert King, M.S., a frequent contributor to the newspaper, said, Chromium deficiency in humans leads to high insulin resistance and then to diabetes. However, he Continue reading >>

Supplements For Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Supplements For Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Reset Of the 15 million Americans who have Type II diabetes, more than a third are unaware of it. Another 21 million Americans have a greater than 50/50 chance of developing the disease because they have impaired blood-sugar metabolism. This year alone more than 187,000 people will die of Type II diabetes, also called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), making it the sixth leading cause of death by disease. Each day, over 2,200 people are diagnosed with this chronic life debilitating, expansive, and pro-aging disease. Learning about supplements for diabetes prevention and treatment is essential to a long and healthy life. What is Diabetes? Glucose is a simple sugar found in food. It is an essential nutrient that provides energy for the proper functioning of the body cells. After meals, food is digested in the stomach and the intestines into glucose and other nutrients. The glucose in digested food is absorbed by the intestinal cells into the bloodstream, and is carried by blood to all the cells in the body. However, glucose cannot enter the cells alone. It needs assistance from insulin in order to penetrate the cell walls. Insulin therefore acts as a regulator of glucose metabolism in the body. Insulin is called the “hunger hormone”. As the blood sugar level increases following a carbohydrate rich meal, the corresponding insulin level rises with the eventual lowering of the blood sugar level and glucose is transported from the blood into the cell for energy. When the blood glucose levels are lowered, the insulin release from the pancreas is turned off. When the blood sugar level drops below a certain level, hunger is felt. This often occurs a few hours after the meal. In normal individuals, such a regulatory system helps to keep blood glucose levels in Continue reading >>

Potential Benefits Of Chromium Picolinate For Diabetes

Potential Benefits Of Chromium Picolinate For Diabetes

Chromium is an essential trace mineral found in our bodies. It's required for a number of bodily functions, one of which is the proper digestion of food. On top of this, levels of chromium in our blood have been linked to eye health, with low levels increasing the risk of glaucoma (an eye condition you're at increased risk of with diabetes). Chromium can also slow down calcium loss from our bones. And in terms of the benefits of chromium picolinate for diabetes, this essential mineral may help you manage your condition. What is known for certain about chromium is that it's vital for human nutrition and is required for Surprisingly, this function was discovered by chance patients receiving liquid nutrition in a hospital were developing diabetes, but a diagnoses of type 2 diabetes was prevented once chromium was added to the liquid nutrition. Let's explore chromium in a little more detail Please note that this information is not an endorsement for chromium. We are simply sharing the research surrounding it. You should always discuss supplementation with your doctor. Chromium binds to a special protein within cells called low-molecular weight chromium binding substance (LMWCr). This substance switches it into its active form. Once activated, it exerts several metabolic influences, one of which is the LMWCr binds to insulin receptors within beta-cells in the pancreas and potentiates their activity. Or in simpler terms, it amplifies the action of insulin as it carries out its function of helping glucose in the bloodstream get into cells. Some research even suggests that this chromium-mediated amplification may increase the activity of insulin by 7 times its normal speed! If you have diabetes, you have metabolic syndrome a condition of altered metabolism symptoms of which in Continue reading >>

Chromium | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

Chromium | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

Chromium (Cr0) is an ubiquitous trace metal. The predominant chromium form in the body is trivalent chromium (Cr3+), which may play a role in normal insulin function. (More information) Trivalent chromium has been proposed to be the cofactor for an oligopeptide called chromodulin. Chromodulin may be able to potentiate the action of insulin, hence improving tissue sensitivity to insulin and facilitating glucose transport into cells. (More information) Potential chromium deficiency cases have been associated with symptoms resembling diabetes mellitus : impaired glucose tolerance and increased insulin requirements. (More information) The lack of an accurate measure of chromium nutritional status prevents the identification of individuals who may be susceptible to chromium deficiency. In 2001, the US Institute of Medicine set the adequate intake ( AI ) of chromium at 20-35 g/day for adults. (More information) Randomized controlled trials have failed to provide any evidence of benefits of chromium supplementation in the prevention or treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. (More information) A well-balanced diet that includes fruit, vegetables, meat, fish, and grains should easily cover dietary needs of chromium. (More information) Few adverse events have been reported with chromium supplementation. (More information) Chromium was first discovered in 1797. The most stable oxidation state of chromium in biological systems is trivalent chromium (Cr3+), which forms relatively inert complexes with proteins and nucleic acids (1) . The essentiality of trivalent chromium is questioned, and its presumed function in the body remains poorly understood. Another common and stable form of chromium in the environment is hexavalent chromium (Cr6+). Hexavalent Continue reading >>

Can Chromium Help With Diabetes?

Can Chromium Help With Diabetes?

Chromium is an essential mineral—just to clarify, chrome metal is made by electroplating a very thin layer of the mineral chromium onto metal or plastic—and while chrome may be useful for your car’s bumper, it is not useful for your overall health! Chromium appears to be necessary for the optimal function of insulin. There is a relationship between being low in chromium and an increased risk for diabetes and high blood sugar—and an increased risk for high triglyceride levels, heart disease, and high cholesterol levels.[1] Many people are low in this essential mineral—particularly the elderly, those who are physically very active, pregnant women AND those people who consume high levels of sugar and sugar-filled foods. Chromium: The Basics Chromium (Cr) in the body is generally in its trivalent form, or Cr3+. Cr3+ is thought to act as a cofactor for a protein known as chromodulin. Chromodulin is believed to enhance the signaling activity of insulin after insulin binds to the cells of the body. The enhanced signaling activity of insulin would result in increased uptake of blood sugar by cells, thus decreasing the level of sugar in the blood.[2] There are a lot of “unknowns” regarding chromium, but it is believed that men over the age of 14 are adequately supplied (Adequate Intake) with about 35 mcg/day while women over the age of 14 are adequately supplied with a bit less—about 24 mcg/day. Higher amounts of chromium are needed in pregnancy (29 mcg/day) and breastfeeding (44 mcg/day), but it is not known if gestational diabetes is related to low chromium levels during pregnancy. Adults over the age of 50 require about 30mcg/day while children require lower amounts based on their age. There is another form of chromium—the hexavalent form, or Cr6+. This form Continue reading >>

Cinnamon & Chromium For Diabetes

Cinnamon & Chromium For Diabetes

Cinnamon, a spice derived from the bark of several trees of the genus Cinnamomum, has garnered attention for its purported ability to lower blood sugar. Chromium, a mineral used by the body in minute quantities known as micrograms, is also widely used as a natural method to regulate blood sugar levels and to help with diabetes management. Consult your doctor before using cinnamon or chromium to treat diabetes. Video of the Day Cinnamon lowers blood sugar in ways that are unrelated to insulin, according to a study published in the 2010 issue of the journal "Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry." In this study on laboratory animals with Type 1 diabetes, 30 mg per kg body weight of cinnamon per day for 22 days reduced blood sugar levels and kidney stress. The researchers observed that cinnamon worked by increasing glucose transporter molecules on muscle and fat cells and by increasing energy expenditure in cells. The results of this preliminary animal study may be prove helpful, along with further research to confirm the results on humans, in distinguishing how cinnamon can best be used in the treatment of diabetes in humans. Antioxidant Effects Antioxidant compounds known as procyanidin oligomers are responsible for the blood sugar-regulating effects of cinnamon, according to a study published in the February 2011 issue of the journal "Phytomedicine." In the study on laboratory animals, doses of 200 mg and 300 mg of cinnamon per kg body weight significantly improved the ability of insulin-resistant liver cells to absorb and utilize glucose. The researchers concluded that the results of their preliminary animal study indicate that cinnamon may be able to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease blood sugar levels in humans with Type 2 diabetes. Further research on the Continue reading >>

Chromium Picolinate Worsens Insulin Sensitivity In Healthy, Non-diabetic, Non-obese Individuals By Up To 25% - Suppversity: Nutrition And Exercise Science For Everyone

Chromium Picolinate Worsens Insulin Sensitivity In Healthy, Non-diabetic, Non-obese Individuals By Up To 25% - Suppversity: Nutrition And Exercise Science For Everyone

Chromium Picolinate Worsens Insulin Sensitivity in Healthy, Non-Diabetic, Non-Obese Individuals by Up to 25% The more supplements you take the more likely you are to get way more than the 200mcg of chromium of which previous studies have shown that they are useless for healthy people, but at least not detrimental (cf. Lukaski 1996 & 2007; Vincent. 2007). Especially people who like the 'poly-supplementary' approach are yet at risk of getting so much of a this trace mineral that it will hamper not improve their insulin sensitivity. I don't have to tell you that you would already be dead if you were following all the bro-scientific advice that's out there on the Internet and still I usually recognize a certain reluctance to give up on what X suggests and Y has tried an what has worked so well for Z. One of the instances, where I have hitherto been missing a 100% convincing argument to argue that this is just another instance where common wisdom would in fact be better called "common stupidity" is the "insulin mimetic" or "insulin sensitizer" (or whatever your favorite bro-expert may call it) chromium picolinate. With the recent publication of the result of a study on the effects of chromium supplementation in healthy individuals there is now finally a human study that confirms that chromium, which has never been an "insulin sensitizer", but rather an "insulin release amplifier" that reduced blood glucose in diabetics by simply having them produce even more insulin is not a supplement any healthy man or woman, let alone athlete should consider a staple of his or her regimen. The long and short: Chromium hampers insulin sensitivity in normoglycemic individuals For their experiment lead author Umesh Masharani and his colleagues from the UCSA recruited a group of 27 non-obese Continue reading >>

Chromium Do You Use It | Diabetic Connect

Chromium Do You Use It | Diabetic Connect

I too have Dumping Syndrome. But I started taking HCL with Pepsin (Hydrocloric Acid) (Which you have to google to find out how to take since you can only take when you eat protein, plus if you take too much, the quickest, best, way to fix it is to take baking soda in water) to help my stomach digest before it goes further since , you know, the lining of my gut is not good enough to digest. Anyway it has helped a LOT. Also, I figure that any drug I took probably was not digested well enough to work. Chromium sounds like a good idea! I am overweight, but just want to be healthy. GTF chromium is bound with niacin for easier absorption! Chromium in its pure state cannot be absorbed by the body. This is why itis chelated or bound with another substance. I am type 2 diabetic where do you find niacin? and is that better than cinnamon with chromium picolinate. I am confused on what to take for vitamins and supplements any suggestions. Research and dig to find the supplements that your body needs. Your doctor can give you blood tests that will help you figure things out. I take Niacin for my cholesterol. My cholesterol is 170. Not too bad, but my doctor wanted me on statins. I could not tolerate them, so I take niacin for it instead. BUT it can raise your blood sugar, so you need to talk to your doctor or pharmacist first. Start low and work up. But you have to test your numbers as you do, to make sure you are not exchanging it for higher glucose numbers. in most any pharmaiy or in a health food store, or send for it online. You might want to get a slow releasing Niacin as often you will get a "flush" when you're taking it. I've heard the same thing except that my resource said to use the GTF Chromium formulation specific for Glocose Tolerance (Formulation). Continue reading >>

Chromium Picolinate For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Chromium Picolinate For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Chromium Picolinate for the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes 1Assistant Director, Integrative Medicine, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine 2Assistant Director, Vascular Research Lab, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine 3Data Analyst, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine 4Professor of Toxicology and Molecular Epidemiology, University of Southern Maine 5Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology), Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine 6Director, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Treat Strategies Diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and metabolic syndrome are considered precursors to type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus. 1 Endothelial dysfunction is also associated with increased risk for diabetes and is directly linked to insulin resistance 2 and hyperglycemia. While pharmacotherapy with such drugs as metformin, acarbose, orlistat, and thiazolidinediones can reduce risk of T2D, 3 their cost and potential adverse effects can be objectionable to patients who do not yet have an actual disease. 4 Intensive diet and lifestyle change can play an important role in diabetes prevention 5 though adherence to these regimens is often difficult. 6 The micronutrient chromium (Cr) is of interest in this regard as a potential means of improving glucose tolerance 7 , 8 by reducing insulin resistance. 9 Chromium picolinate is widely marketed to the public with diverse health claims pertaining to glucose metabolism, insulin action, muscle mass, weight control, and diabetes prevention. 10 In 2002, estimated sales of chromium-based supplements was $85 million (USD Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Prescription

The Prediabetes Prescription

A nutrition and supplement plan that can help to keep prediabetes from progressing Prediabetes is a wake-up call—one that does not have to be a prelude to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Most people can take steps to reverse prediabetes—wait too long and type 2 diabetes will have to be treated medically. An estimated 70–100 million Americans have prediabetes, most of them undiagnosed. Being overweight or obese, having difficulty losing weight, feeling tired much of the time, and having poor concentration are common symptoms of prediabetes. Getting Tested Having either a fasting blood sugar level between 100–125 mg/dl or a HbA1C level between 5.7 and 6.9 percent is a sign of prediabetes. A fasting blood sugar between 90 and 99 mg/dl points to looming prediabetes. It’s also important to have your fasting insulin tested—a measure of 11 mcIU/ml or higher indicates that your body is working very hard to control blood sugar. A high fasting insulin is an accurate early predictor of diabetes risk in the coming 10–15 years. The Cause In the vast majority of cases, prediabetes is a consequence of eating a diet high in refined carbohydrates, including sugary foods, for many years. These foods include candies, desserts, white bread, white rice, pizza, pasta, muffins, bagels, grits, and tortillas. Potatoes and rice wafers have a similar effect on blood sugar. Conventional Treatments A variety of drugs are commonly prescribed to people with prediabetes. Like most drugs, they have side effects. Eating Tips Improving eating habits is essential. Focus on quality protein (fish, chicken, grass-fed beef), which stabilizes and lowers blood sugar levels. Eat plenty of high-fiber vegetables as well. Fiber, particularly soluble fiber, slows the breakdown of carbohydrates and also low Continue reading >>

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