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Donate Unused Diabetic Supplies

Where Can I Donate Unused/unopened Insulin?

Where Can I Donate Unused/unopened Insulin?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Where can I donate unused/unopened insulin? My dad recently had a shipment of meds come to our house with about 10 vials of Humilin. He is in Florida now (back after holidays) and said that his endo is changing his whole program...going to Lantus and Humalog, so in my fridge are about 10 boxes of unopened, unused Humilin that he won't be needed any longer! I would love to donate them to some old age home or some facility where poor Diabetics can have access to them. Who should I call? I was thinking JDRF? do you have any retirement homes in your area? I'd call them directly to see if they need it.. JDRF is a good idea.. they could point you in the right direction.. or your endo's office.. they may know someone that could use it I'd call the Endo's office. They may have patients who do not have insurance and must purchase insulin out-of-pocket. I'll bet they'd love some freebies! I wondered this same thing recently because when we move to a pump we will have quite a bit of Levemir that will be unused. I emailed Insulin for Life. It is an organisation in Australia that supplies diabetes supplies around the world to those who would not get them otherwise. I asked if they have a group here in America. The response I got was that they accept insulin and test strips with at least 5 months to use-by date. They can just be sent by ordinary mail to: My dad recently had a shipment of meds come to our house with about 10 vials of Humilin. He is in Florida now (back after holidays) and said that his endo is changing his whole program...going to Lantus and Humalog, so in my fridge are about 10 boxes of unopened, unused Humilin that he won't be needed any longer! I would love Continue reading >>

How To Donate

How To Donate

This page will give you information on how to find places near you that will welcome your extra supplies as a donation, if we are unable to purchase them from you. Under the section HELP FOR UNINSURED DIABETICS you will also find links that will direct you to help finding low-cost prescriptions and assistance with getting your diabetic supplies if you are facing financial challenges. How To Donate Your Supplies Uninsured and under-insured diabetics often are not able to pay for their diabetic supplies. Donations of diabetic supplies are greatly needed for low income and uninsured diabetics. Charity organizations look for donations of test strips, glucose meters, syringes, sharps containers, insulin pumps and alcohol pads. Step 1 Check the Islets of Hope website for a list of charitable organizations that accept donations of diabetes supplies and redistribute them to low-income or uninsured diabetics and health care clinics. Step 2 Contact hospitals, low income and free health care clinics and ask if they accept donations of diabetes supplies. Find a health center in your area: Step 3 Consider your local animal shelter! They are often overlooked when they could be desperately in need of supplies to help the diabetic animals in their care. Find a shelter in your area: Step 4 Call social services and ask if they know of organizations accepting donations or of a specific individual in need of free diabetes supplies. Find a homeless shelter in your area: Step 5 Ask your doctor if s/he is interested in accepting your diabetic supplies. Your doctor will most likely encounter an uninsured diabetic patient who could benefit from free supplies. Step 6 Place an advertisement in your local newspaper listing your diabetes supplies “for free.” Talk to the newspaper about placing Continue reading >>

Donations Of Medical Supplies

Donations Of Medical Supplies

Community Connections Free Clinic will accept the medications and medical supply items listed below. All medications must be sealed. Sealed containers have a foil cover, are in a blister pack, or otherwise packaged in an anti-tamper proof container. All donations should be clean and in excellent shape. Dirty or worn donations will not be accepted. Before use, any identifying information will be removed. The following supplies and medications will be accepted: Insulin vials, pens, or pen refills (refrigerated). Mediations for chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, etc. (sealed inhalers, nasal sprays, and nebulizer medications). Non-narcotic pain medications such as Metamucil, Lamisil Cream, etc. Samples from an official pharmaceutical representative or practitioner volunteer. The following supplies and medications will not be accepted: Opened medications or expired medications (call the Iowa County Health Department, 608-935-2810, to learn how to safely dispose of unneeded medications.) Syringes pre-loaded with medication (i.e., Lovenox) Blood testing machines or the strips used in these machines; we bulk order these products. Sleep apnea machines (can be donated to Upland Hills Health Sleep Center). Nutritional drinks such as Ensure, Osmolite, or Carnation Instant Breakfast. Large medical supply items such as beds, etc., will not be accepted. Contact the Aging and Disability Resource Center (608-935-0389) about these and other items in this list. Continue reading >>

Insulin For Life - Contact

Insulin For Life - Contact

Over 200 donated meters and associated supplies arriving in Fiji, being used by the National Diabetes Centre. Diabetes supplies being distributed in Cebu, Philippines. A Thank You message from the Philippines. Samanta at 4 with insulin donated by IFL. Samanta at 10, alive with your help. Handing over ceremony of the donated supplies to the Ministry of Health and Medical Services, Solomon Islands in the Pacific. Dr Neng-Chun Yu, President of TADE (left), Neil Donelan (IFL) & Wayne H-H Sheu, President, Chinese Taipei Diabetes Association, with donation to IFL Sujata from India - before, and after 4 weeks of treatment with insulin Ecuador girl who receives donated supplies from IFL Most people in most countries of the world who need life-saving insulin cannot obtain it. Insulin for Life Australia is a not-for-profit organisation that collects and distributes insulin and other diabetes supplies that would otherwise be wasted. These are donated to recognised organisations in many countries, with agreed monitoring systems, on an ongoing, sustainable basis, and following emergencies. Recipient organisations include childrens diabetes camps, programs involving Australian medical students, Diabetes Associations and clinics. This is an innovative, cost-effective and life-saving humanitarian assistance program... one model "right for the 21st century." For details about the supplies we can accept please complete the form on the Contact Us Page Sir Michael Hirst, Past-President of the International Diabetes Federation www.idf.org is the Patron of Insulin for Life Australia. Sir Michael has said to us that the work of IFL .is hugely valued. There is nothing more noble in life than helping to save lives, as you do. We very greatly appreciate your commitment and the hard work of Insu Continue reading >>

What Can I Do With 1000 Unused Insulin Needles?

What Can I Do With 1000 Unused Insulin Needles?

What can I do with 1000 unused insulin needles? A friend's mother was into bulk purchasing and she passed away a month ago. He gave me a bunch of stuff she left behind (massive amounts of sterile gauze, which is a win because it's virtually the same thing as massive amounts of cheesecloth, which I use all the time) and it includes almost a thousand sterile, still-packaged insulin needles. REtail value looks to be in the neighborhood of at least $150, but since I'm not a pharmacy, I'm thinking I probably can't sell them. A needle exchange program, perhaps? 1 Donate to charity, & get a tax deduction. 2 The four characteristics of humanism are curiosity, a free mind, belief in good taste, and belief in the human race. Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Donate to charity, & get a tax deduction. Great idea. Check with your local Red Cross, ask a nearby hospital if they know any organization that could use the needles. 4 Some states require a prescription to sell syringes with needles. I'd check that first if you want to sell them. If you're amenable to donating them, medical charities like Doctors Without Borders, or even animal shelters can use them. Just call ahead and make sure it's something they'd like to take. 5 Also consider animal shelters, if that makes it easier. The last set of extra syringes I had got sent to Haiti. 6 Since the OP is looking for advice, let's move this to IMHO. They're not worth much. WalMart sells them for less than 25c each, and most online pharmacies that ship drugs just include them free with order. So it's unlikely anyone would offer any more than about a hundred bucks on eBay. 8 Donating to a needle exchange program would get you bonus karma points. Those folks get noise from just about everybody. A kind gesture would be a welcome Continue reading >>

Gainesville Nonprofit Readying Diabetes Supplies For Irma Response

Gainesville Nonprofit Readying Diabetes Supplies For Irma Response

A Gainesville nonprofit is preparing to ship thousands of pounds of diabetes-management supplies to those in the path of Hurricane Irma days after it also did so in response to Hurricane Harvey hitting Texas. Insulin for Life USA has already started to coordinate with partner organizations in South Florida and Puerto Rico to donate and ship the supplies, saidMark Atkinson, president of the organization and director of the University of Florida Diabetes Institute. There hasnt been much of a break here between what we did in Texas and what were prepared to do in South Florida, said Atkinson, whos also a professor in UFs College of Medicine. The organization typically delivers the diabetes-management supplies internationally, including to Belize and Gambia.For the Harvey response, it donated and shipped about 4,000 pounds of it to Texas, including insulin, glucose readers and syringes. Items used to manage diabetes need to be stored under specific conditions, and the flooding and power outages in Texas caused the loss of usable supplies, Atkinson said. Proper management of diabetes is a challenge during a natural disaster, he said. The insulin itself needs to be refrigerated, so if you lose power, the insulin has the potential of going bad. He also noted that glucose-monitoring equipment can be destroyed by water. Insulin for Life partnered with a network of disaster-relief organizations from around the country that set up distribution sites in parts of southeast Texas affected by Harvey, including Houston and Wharton. In preparation for Irma, Insulin for Life is in need of volunteers, unused diabetes supplies and money to cover shipping costs, Atkinson said. Meanwhile, those with diabetes can visit the organizations website to learn more about special storm preparations. Continue reading >>

Where Do Expired Test Strips I Donate Go?

Where Do Expired Test Strips I Donate Go?

You may wonder what is going to happen to the expired test strips you donate. Don’t worry, we put them to good use. The expired test strips you donate will be donated to the Pet Diabetes Program or the Diabetes Art Center. These are wonderful programs that help support both humans and animals with diabetes. The Pet Diabetes Program gets expired test strips that have been expired for less than 1 year It is not only people that are affected by diabetes, but animals can get diabetes too. Treating diabetes in an animal is just as costly as treating it in a human. Since most pets do not have health insurance their owners must pay out of pocket for their testing supplies and medication. Many owners do not test their pets regularly because of the costs associated with it. This leads to poor control and increases the risk of diabetic complications. We donate expired test strips that have been expired for less than a year to families with a diabetic pet. Control solution is also provided at no cost to ensure that the results are accurate. This program has improved the lives of several diabetic pets who would have otherwise suffered from poorly controlled diabetes. The Diabetes Art Center gets expired test strips that have been expired for more than 1 year Expired test strips that have been expired for more than one year are donated to the Diabetes Art Center. Diabetic artists of all ages create masterpieces made of old diabetic supplies and The Diabetes Art Center auctions them off to the highest bidder. All proceeds from the auctions go to help the uninsured/underinsured pay for their antidiabetic medications and diabetes testing supplies. This is a great way to recycle those expired test strips and help out a diabetic in need. Continue reading >>

Helping Developing Countries

Helping Developing Countries

Home » Here to Help » Helping Developing Countries IDDT helps poor children and young people with diabetes Have you any unwanted, in-date insulin in your fridge? IDDT is the UK arm of an Australian organisation, ‘Insulin for Life’ [IFL]. IFL is a not-for-profit organisation which collects unwanted, unopened, in-date insulin and test strips to send to developing countries as part of a humanitarian aid programme. Details of IFL can be found by visiting www.insulinforlife.org Here is a true story: “Kilpana was a 5 year old little girl with diabetes who visited the Nagpur clinic regularly with her parents. One day she was brought into the clinic in a coma and ketoacidosis. Her parents had stopped giving her insulin because they simply could not afford it any longer. In desperation they had resorted to alternative medicine. Kilpana died!” If children with diabetes have adequate daily doses of insulin, they grow normally and can do things that children without diabetes can do. But if the dose is inadequate, then their growth is impaired and their quality of life is adversely affected. If insulin injections are stopped, they go into coma and this can be fatal. In developing countries the cost of insulin for one person can be as much as 50% of a family’s income, so one of the main problems for poor families is that find it extremely difficult to afford the insulin and medical treatment for just one child in the family. Under agreed protocols, IDDT collects and sends unwanted insulin and other diabetes supplies to clinics in developing countries for distribution to children and adults with diabetes who cannot afford insulin and treatment they need to stay alive. IDDT ensures that any insulin and supplies you donate will reach the developing countries in need of our h Continue reading >>

The Donation Of Supplies Is Key To The Mission Of Ifl Usa

The Donation Of Supplies Is Key To The Mission Of Ifl Usa

Sharing what you no longer need will save lives…. The reasons underlying this tragic and unacceptable circumstance are numerous; the one common thread is that it occurs to each child through no fault of their own. 90,000 children with type 1 diabetes, from over 70 countries, suffer, sometimes even die, for lack of insulin. We collect in-date & unneeded insulin, test strips, as well as other diabetes supplies, and ship them to developing countries. They are then distributed, free of charge, to children and adults with diabetes who otherwise would go without these life saving medications. Continue reading >>

Details

Details

LH-5000.5100-350Home Glucose Monitoring Systems Definition Programs that pay for or provide equipment and accessories that allow individuals with diabetes to monitor their blood sugar levels in the privacy of their own homes as a means of analyzing and controlling their disease. Included are subcutaneous glucose monitoring systems which implant a subcutaneous sensor that records blood sugar levels at regular intervals over a multi-day period which is analyzed by a computer following the test period; systems that employ meters and test strips which measure the blood sugar levels using a drop of blood extracted by pricking a finger; wrist devices which use small electric currents to extract fluid from the skin, measure its glucose content and sound an alarm if blood sugar reaches levels that are dangerously high or low; and tests which measure the amount of glucose in the urine. Patients are encouraged to use the latter method several times a day. TI-1800.5000Medical Equipment/Assistive Technology Donation Programs Definition Programs that accept assistive technology equipment (i.e., equipment, appliances and assistive aids for people with disabilities), sickroom equipment, medical bandages, respiratory aids and other medical supplies that are required by people who are convalescing following surgery or illness, refurbish them if necessary, and keep them for use in their own program or donate them to other community-based organizations for their own use or for distribution to the people they serve. A disorder in which the pancreas produces too little insulin with the result that the body is unable to adequately metabolize sugar. Principal symptoms are elevated blood sugar, sugar in the urine, excessive urine production and increased food intake. Complications of diabetes Continue reading >>

What To Do With Unused Needles

What To Do With Unused Needles

Daily injections are a part of life for most surrogates. In the majority of surrogate medical cycles we will ask our surrogates to administer one intramuscular shot per day over the course of the first ten to twelve weeks of the pregnancy. This necessitates the need for you to keep a large inventory of syringes and needles on hand during the medical cycle. Once you are done with these injections and weaned from medications it is typical for there to be several additional needles and syringes on hand. This excess supply often provides a conundrum for our surrogates: what to do with all of those unused needles? The simple answer is this: you need to talk with your intended parents and/or case specialist first. These needles and syringes are the property of your intended parents, as they purchased them for your use during the medical cycle of their surrogacy. No matter what you choose to do with the unused medical supplies and medications, this decision should be cleared with your intended parents first. That said, there are a few common options for disposing of all of those unneeded needles and syringes. Send them back Some surrogates and their intended parents will opt to send the unused medical supplies back to the pharmacy from which they were purchased. If this is the wish of your intended parents, you’ll want to call the pharmacy in advance to see if any restocking fees exist, if they’ll accept the return of sharps, and how to ship the items safely. Dispose of them properly Perhaps the most common choice is simply disposal, as you’ll need to dispose of your used sharps anyway. In this case it is important to open the sharps and deposit them into the sharps container as opposed to simply placing them into the trash. You’ll also want to find a location that off Continue reading >>

Hands On Nashville | Donate Items

Hands On Nashville | Donate Items

Many of Hands On Nashville's Nonprofit Partners accept donated items. Listed below is a wish list of items needed to help with the continuation of their successful programs. To donate your items, you can contact the agency directly. Please let the agencies know that Hands On Nashville sent you. Thank you for your support of Middle Tennessee's nonprofits! 16:10 Now & Then, Inc. needs computers, software, furniture, administrative and financial support, business advice, and marketing and strategic planning advice. 2nd Chance 4 Pets needs gift cards to office-supply stores and-pro bono printing services. More information:[email protected] American Cancer Society Hope Lodge needsbasicitems for guests staying away from home (toilet paper, disposable plates/utensils/cups, nonperishable foods, sugar, etc). For a full list of needed items, click here . More information:(615) 342-0840 American Red Cross needs in-kind donations of snacks and other nonperishable refreshments for meetings and events. Begin Anew needs $10 or $15 Walmart or Kroger gift cards for clients, womens and mens gloves/hats/scarves,new board games for children to play,and snacks for children and adults. More information:(615) 244-3669 [email protected] Bellevue Edible Learning Lab, Inc. (BELL Garden) needs garden tools (shovels, hoes, hand-weeding tools, etc.), kid-friendly utensils (harvest knives, knives, spoons, and spatulas), egg cartons, and basic cooking staples (olive oil, flour, spices, salad dressings, etc.), and especially kitchen tools (salad spinners, mixing bowls, cutting boards, graters, blenders, food processors). More information:[email protected] Bethlehem Centers of Nashville needs notebook paper, hand sanitizer, glue sticks, multi-surface cleaners, pencils, paper towels, Continue reading >>

Getting Rid Of Used Needles, Syringes, And Lancets

Getting Rid Of Used Needles, Syringes, And Lancets

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, syringes (needles) and lancets are medical wastes called “sharps.” Sharps can be dangerous to those handling garbage, if the sharps are thrown in the regular trash.”Sharps boxes” are recommended for home use. Many pharmacies sell sharps boxes at a reasonable cost and will allow you to return the boxes when they are full. General Guidelines for Sharps Disposal Use a sharps box if one is available. Some hospitals and clinics provide or sell sharps boxes. Check with your diabetes educator to learn about your local disposal options and procedures. Remember never to re-cap your syringes before you dispose of them. If you do not have a regular sharps box, use a hard (puncture-proof) non-clear container for disposing used clipped or un-clipped syringes and lancets. If you choose to clip the syringes, use a device that traps the clipped points in a puncture-proof compartment. Properly dispose of your syringes and lancets when traveling or bring your used sharps home for disposal. Safety Precautions Do not drop your used syringes or lancets into the regular trash. Do not cut off syringe needles with scissors or break off the needles. The needle could break off as you are cutting it and could hurt you or someone else. Do not use clear plastic bottles for syringe disposal. Children or drug users may see the syringes and try to open the bottle. Do not put plastic bottles filled with syringes/lancets in recycle bins. Insulin for Life USA Insulin for Life USA is part of a global network of independent organizations that collects in-date, unopened and unneeded insulin, test strips, and other diabetes supplies from around the world and distributes them to children and adults with diabetes in developing countries. Individuals and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Supplies For Hurricane Harvey Victims Gathered By Uf Health Researchers Non-profit Group

Diabetic Supplies For Hurricane Harvey Victims Gathered By Uf Health Researchers Non-profit Group

When Hurricane Harvey swamped Southeast Texas, many people lost access to crucial medical supplies. A Gainesville nonprofit group led by a University of Florida Health diabetes researcher and his wife has stepped up to help, getting thousands of pounds of insulin and diabetic supplies on the road to Texas with more to come. Insulin for Life USA typically gathers unused diabetic supplies and dispatches them to needy patients around the world. Hurricane Harvey created an instant need closer to home. There are a lot of people in Southeast Texas who have diabetes. Many of them lost the insulin and supplies they need to manage their disease, said Mark Atkinson, Ph.D., director of the UF Diabetes Institute, a professor in the UF College of Medicines departments of pathology and pediatrics and president of Insulin for Life USA. On Wednesday afternoon, five pallets of diabetic supplies some 4,000 pounds in all were boxed up and sent to Texas. For Atkinson, who is president of Insulin for Life, and his wife, Carol, its their first time handling domestic aid since they founded the group in 2012. As Mark Atkinson spoke earlier this week about organizing donations, emails about the need for diabetic supplies in the Houston area kept pinging his phone. Its a tall order for the Atkinsons and their small cadre of volunteers, which include UF College of Pharmacy students, but they get results: Last year, the group distributed more than $3 million of diabetic supplies to people who need them. Insulin for Life is accepting all types of diabetes-related donations in-date, unneeded insulin vials, pens and cartridges; glucagon; A1C test kits; glucose meters and strips, syringes and other supplies. Cash donations, which help with shipping expenses and allow the supplies to be distributed fr Continue reading >>

Details

Details

LH-5000.5100-350Home Glucose Monitoring Systems Definition Programs that pay for or provide equipment and accessories that allow individuals with diabetes to monitor their blood sugar levels in the privacy of their own homes as a means of analyzing and controlling their disease. Included are subcutaneous glucose monitoring systems which implant a subcutaneous sensor that records blood sugar levels at regular intervals over a multi-day period which is analyzed by a computer following the test period; systems that employ meters and test strips which measure the blood sugar levels using a drop of blood extracted by pricking a finger; wrist devices which use small electric currents to extract fluid from the skin, measure its glucose content and sound an alarm if blood sugar reaches levels that are dangerously high or low; and tests which measure the amount of glucose in the urine. Patients are encouraged to use the latter method several times a day. TI-1800.5000Medical Equipment/Assistive Technology Donation Programs Definition Programs that accept assistive technology equipment (i.e., equipment, appliances and assistive aids for people with disabilities), sickroom equipment, medical bandages, respiratory aids and other medical supplies that are required by people who are convalescing following surgery or illness, refurbish them if necessary, and keep them for use in their own program or donate them to other community-based organizations for their own use or for distribution to the people they serve. A disorder in which the pancreas produces too little insulin with the result that the body is unable to adequately metabolize sugar. Principal symptoms are elevated blood sugar, sugar in the urine, excessive urine production and increased food intake. Complications of diabetes Continue reading >>

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