diabetestalk.net

Donate Expired Diabetic Test Strips

Glucose Test Strips Expiration Dates A Waste Of Supplies

Glucose Test Strips Expiration Dates A Waste Of Supplies

Glucose Test Strips Expiration Dates A Waste of Supplies Yesterday, I helped a supplier move some boxes of test strips. Im sure youve all seen a 3 x 3 x 3 box of reinforced cardboard (it goes by Flex-bin, Carboy, Cowboy, Gaylord, etc. depending on where you are Photo below). After filling 16 of these, they were tossed into the dumpster. Ive never felt so guilty for obeying the law. But the strips had expired a month ago, and the FDA will throw you in jail for selling expired test strips. I dont recommend it. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) spends most of its time creating ambiguous regulations instead of finding a solution to the actual problem. I discuss this and the medias role in the blog: I have a few questions for the FDA or anyone who knows basic chemistry. How do you determine an expiration date for test strips? It seems like theres a huge conflict of interest if the manufacturers decide. 27 million Americans use glucose test strips multiple times every day. Without it, health complications arise fast. Heres an idea why not find ways to extend the shelf life, or allow people to decide for themselves if they want to use expired boxes. Its not like test strips are good one day, and shut down on expiration day. Its a gradual process, and theres no definite date. Heres a quick list the FDA might want to consult: 2. Can we improve the quality, thereby creating a more reliable product that expires in 5 years instead of 2 years? 3. Diabetes is an epidemic. Instead of half-assed preventive measures, how about we adapt. 4. What does the latest research on expiration dates say? Are we just playing it safe? We could afford that 20 years ago, not anymore. 5. Who determines this sacred date, and has it proven to be accurate? Theyll spew nonsense about the risks of usi Continue reading >>

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

Chelsea Arnold was getting into debt over tiny pieces of plastic: diabetic test strips. When Arnold was first diagnosed with diabetes she needed to test her blood sugar 10 times a day. She went to Wal-Mart and found that one box, which contained only a five-day supply of test strips, was $80. Arnold called her parents and told them she didn't know what to do. She didn't have the money. Arnold then did what a lot of people do when they need help: She searched on Google. She typed in the words "cheap test strips," and Craigslist came up. She bought eight boxes for less than $100. At Wal-Mart, she would have paid $640. Arnold said, "it was like having a life sentence and then realizing that there's a cure." With this Google search, Arnold stumbled into an underground economy for diabetic supplies. It's a market that offers a lower-cost option for test strips, though it is hard for customers to know where the boxes come from. Some boxes may be repackaged and unsafe to use, and some boxes are sold by diabetics who are desperate for cash. But many of them come from people who have health insurance and have accumulated extra test strips. Trey falls into this category. (He asked us not to use his last name, because he fears retribution from his insurance company, even though he feels he hasn't broken any laws.) He moved from one type of blood sugar monitoring system to another type of monitoring system and ended up with 20 extra test strip boxes. At that point, Trey began researching. He said, "Obviously No. 1: Is it legal to be able to sell test strips?" Trey realized that it is legal, with a caveat. "It's kind of a gray market as long as you don't get them from Medicare and Medicaid," he said. Trey then found a local buyer on Craigslist. It starts to look a little seedy here. Continue reading >>

Growing Diabetic Population Fuels A Black Market

Growing Diabetic Population Fuels A Black Market

Growing diabetic population fuels a black market Test strips, sold over the counter, are resold for quick profit Updated 8:21am, Monday, January 30, 2012 window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: 'thumbnails-c', container: 'taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-5', placement: 'Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 5', target_type: 'mix' }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: 'thumbnails-c', container: 'taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-10', placement: 'Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 10', target_type: 'mix' }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: 'thumbnails-c', container: 'taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-15', placement: 'Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 15', target_type: 'mix' }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: 'thumbnails-c', container: 'taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-18', placement: 'Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 18', target_type: 'mix' }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); Diabetic test strips buyer Brian "Jake" Tucker, of Rotterdam, talks to Times Union reporter Paul Grondahl at the Colonie Library parking lot Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2011 in Colonie, N.Y. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union) less Diabetic test strips buyer Brian "Jake" Tucker, of Rotterdam, talks to Times Union reporter Paul Grondahl at the Colonie Library parking lot Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2011 in Colonie, N.Y. (Lori Van Buren / Times ... more Diabetic test strips buyer Brian "Jake" Tucker, of Rotterdam, right, talks to Times Union reporter Paul Grondahl at the Colonie Library parking lot Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2011 in Colonie, N.Y. (Lori Van Buren / Times Union) less Diabetic test strips buyer Brian " Continue reading >>

Where Do Expired Test Strips I Donate Go?

Where Do Expired Test Strips I Donate Go?

You may wonder what is going to happen to the expired test strips you donate. Don’t worry, we put them to good use. The expired test strips you donate will be donated to the Pet Diabetes Program or the Diabetes Art Center. These are wonderful programs that help support both humans and animals with diabetes. The Pet Diabetes Program gets expired test strips that have been expired for less than 1 year It is not only people that are affected by diabetes, but animals can get diabetes too. Treating diabetes in an animal is just as costly as treating it in a human. Since most pets do not have health insurance their owners must pay out of pocket for their testing supplies and medication. Many owners do not test their pets regularly because of the costs associated with it. This leads to poor control and increases the risk of diabetic complications. We donate expired test strips that have been expired for less than a year to families with a diabetic pet. Control solution is also provided at no cost to ensure that the results are accurate. This program has improved the lives of several diabetic pets who would have otherwise suffered from poorly controlled diabetes. The Diabetes Art Center gets expired test strips that have been expired for more than 1 year Expired test strips that have been expired for more than one year are donated to the Diabetes Art Center. Diabetic artists of all ages create masterpieces made of old diabetic supplies and The Diabetes Art Center auctions them off to the highest bidder. All proceeds from the auctions go to help the uninsured/underinsured pay for their antidiabetic medications and diabetes testing supplies. This is a great way to recycle those expired test strips and help out a diabetic in need. Continue reading >>

The Eco-friendly Diabetic

The Eco-friendly Diabetic

The average person generates 4.3 pounds of waste per day. While there are no specific stats to pull from, its pretty obvious that those livingwith diabetes no matter what type could potentially be contributing morethan the average person to the landfill. Who needs the added stress of their chronic condition negatively impacting the earth?In keeping with the directive to add more greens, here are a few tipsto reduceyour waste: Thats needles, the one lancet you use each month, used insulin bottles, syringes, or pump tubes all of these items cannot be recycled or reused, and shouldbe disposed of in a biohazard container. Test strips falls into this category as well-but in the spirit of being reasonable, lets just try to keep them contained and not liter. Where to start? Ask your doctors office as they will have the most up-to-date local information. Many communities provide disposal services or there are mail-in program options.Find more information and resources for biohazards as well as expired product disposal here . Recycle those packaging materials! All those inserts that come with your medications, CGM and pump suppliesare recyclable along with the box they were delivered in. Just this step alone is tremendous.Check with your pump company to see what recycling programs they offer. For example, Omnipod offers a mail-in program for recycling their pods. If you have supplies you are no longer using, reduce your inventory by donating or selling if they are still in their prime. Insulin For Life accepts donations of supplies andinsulin. Be sure to double check expiration dates. Working meters could be donated to local community programs or Certified Diabetes Educators for teaching purposes.Electronics no longer in working order should be placed in an electronic waste bin Continue reading >>

Can You Use, Buy Or Sell Expired Diabetes Test Strips?

Can You Use, Buy Or Sell Expired Diabetes Test Strips?

Should you use, buy or sell expired diabetes test strips? A diabetic patient knows the worth of the Blood Glucose test strips which are undoubtedly very expensive and is hefty in the pockets if to be purchased on a regular basis. In response to this, the very first question that comes to the mind is that “are you wasting diabetes test strips by throwing them away?” Do they still give you accurate results if you use them after they are expired? These are very valid questions a diabetic patient asks as most if not all know how expensive diabetes test strips are. And for others, you may have too many of it. And you may want to sell diabetes test strips before they all get expired. Long discussions have been made that whether to use or sell expired diabetes test strips or not. Well, before that it is more important to understand about these diabetes test strips and how do they work. How did the argument regarding expired diabetes test strips passes at the first place? The keys aspect of diabetes test strip is the enzymes. The end of the strip is coated with enzymes which are protein made by cells and is present is all living organisms. The end of the test strip is made of plastic. The use of different enzymes can provide greater accuracy within a very short period. These enzymes are either glucose dehydrogenizes or glucose oxidizes. The glucose in a person’s blood reacts with these enzymes that in turn is converted into an electrical current. Once the electricity is being sent through the strip, the blood glucose meter represents the glucose concentration. However, the activity of the enzymes can be reduced by either: Exposure to humidity Experiencing extreme temperature Consequently, errors are going to occur. It will either display high or low readings. That is why Continue reading >>

Second-hand Diabetic Testing Strips Being Sold On Blackmarket

Second-hand Diabetic Testing Strips Being Sold On Blackmarket

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) From social media to the streets, there seems to be a huge demand for diabetic testing strips, which test glucose levels in the blood. For people living with diabetes, like Anna DeFeo, a supply of the strips is essential. Im always testing during the course of the day, she said. If the blood sugar was high, they would know to take extra insulin. If the blood sugar was too low, they would know that they need to take in some sugar, explained Dr. Robert Gabbay , with the Joslin Diabetes Center. Because the little strips are so smart, theyre expensive. Thats a real challenge, Dr. Gabbay said. A box of 50, for example, costs about $80. If youre under-insured or have no coverage at all, the strips can become a financial burden. As a result, second-hand strip dealers have set up shop online, placing ads looking to buy unused and unwanted strips. CBS2s John Dias met up with one such dealer in south Jersey. He took three boxes, gave me $15 for each box for a total of $45, Dias reported. While the dealer claimed to donate the strips with the help of a local church group to people in Africa, experts say theyre more likely to end up online in the new underground economy for diabetic supplies, like cheap test strips. Those strips may not be as accurate, and therefore people are making decisions about taking insulin based on bad information, said Dr. Gabbay. Why take the chance, he said, on a strip that could be expired or tampered with? You dont really know what youre getting that could potentially affect your health, he said. While buying and selling diabetic test strips is not illegal, it is against the law to deal strips paid for by Medicare or Medicaid. Still, experts say diabetics receiving free or low-cost strips are the primary supplier to second-hand d Continue reading >>

Do Diabetic Test Strips Expire?

Do Diabetic Test Strips Expire?

Glucose test strips are expensive. Are you wasting money if you throw away expired strips? Are they still accurate if you use them after they have expired? These are important questions to ask if you cannot afford new test strips, or want to use old ones. Furthermore, you may have too many and want to sell diabetic test strips before they expire. A company named Glucomart performed some tests to help answer these questions. The design and results of their study are shown below. Design They used test strips from different manufacturers that had been expired for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 years. The expired strips were compared with the same brand unexpired strips. Three control solutions were used: normal, high, and low concentration glucose solutions. Test trips were tested three times in each control solution. Statistics were used to test the accuracy of each strip. The brands tested included: Accu-Check Aviva Plus Accu-Check Compact Advocate Bayer Breeze 2 Bayer Contour Bayer Contour Next Element Embrace FreeStyle FreeStyle Insulinx FreeStyle Lite Liberty Nova Max One Precision Xtra One Touch Ultra One Touch Ultra Blue TrueBalance TrueTest Results The accuracy of the test strips depended on: The brand of the test strip. The length of time since expiration. [thumbnail target=”_self” alt=”Accuracy of the test strips by brand ” src=”There was no significant difference between the accuracy of unexpired strips and those that had been expired for up to 1 year. Most strips that expired 2 years previously were accurate, except for Precision Xtra: Precision Xtra strips that expired 2 years ago were not accurate or precise. Those that expired 3 years ago gave false low readings. Most test strips that expired at least 5 years ago were less precise and accurate. They sometimes ga Continue reading >>

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Maybe you've seen the "Diabetic Strips" signs on the side of the road in your state and also wondered what actually happens when you call one of the numbers listed... We wrote about organizations dealing in test strips cheap-for-cash in our post "Test Strip Charities" last year, but without the extra bonus of having an undercover "secret shopper" to check the service out. Now our talented cartoonist, D-Advocate and correspondent Mike Lawson offered to make that happen by following up on one of these surprising road-side signs. Read on to discover what Mike found out! Special to the 'Mine by Mr. Mike Lawson I felt like Woodward. No...I felt like Bernstein. Wait. Which one did Robert Redford play in All The President's Men? That's the one I felt like. I was sitting in a McDonald's parking lot in Scottsdale, Arizona, waiting for a man named Marcus to meet me so I could sell a box of 50 test strips. I arranged this meeting by calling a phone number that I saw on a road-side sign in Phoenix that said "Ca$h Paid For Diabetic Strips." It is not illegal for companies to buy and sell test strips like this — although the companies are required to register with the FDA and many fail to do so — yet this transaction still felt a little shady. When I called the number, for example, I wasn't greeted with a company name but just by a woman who identified herself as "Stephanie." Stephanie told me that there was no physical building for me to drop off the strips, but rather a courier would be sent to me. Stephanie also told me that the price paid for strips varied based on the brand and the expiration date. So I could sell this box of One Touch strips that I purchased for $10 on my private insurance to this unnamed company for $20. And this same box of strips will sell for $40 or mor Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cats In Need: How Can I Support Dcin?

Diabetic Cats In Need: How Can I Support Dcin?

The easiest way is to interact with our Facebook posts - likes, shares, and comments can help the kitties we share find new forever homes or let people who have never heard of us know about a fundraising campaign we have going on. The more you interact with our posts, the more they get out there - and the more lifesaving work DCIN can do! People who would like to send us cash donations can do so via PayPal using the address [email protected] If you choose the "Send money to friends or family" option and pay using your linked bank account, DCIN will get your full donation (no fees will come out). If you want to use your credit card, please opt to pay the associated fees so DCIN doesn't have to pay them. We also often have YouCaring fundraisers going on; you can donate to them via the process outlined above - in the optional message box, just let us know which campaign your donation is intended for. We love to get in-kind donations! If you have new syringes, lancets, Relion Confirm/Prime or Arkray Glucocard meters or unexpired test strips, we'd be happy to have them! We also accept donations of long-expiration-dated insulin and medicines (Zobaline and liquid/injectible B-12 especially). Email [email protected] if you have in-kind donations to offer. We also have a number of campaigns going on at all times where your purchases lead to a donation for DCIN! Here are the current events: Schwan's: When you shop at Schwan's, use our link . 20% of your purchase will come to DCIN. If you'd like to buy an eGift card, that will generate a $10 donation for DCIN. Get tasty food and help DCIN at the same time - it's a win-win! Amazon : Whenever you shop at Amazon, start with our associate link . Your cart needs to be empty when you start, but then everything you add to it will generate a Continue reading >>

Donating Expired Diabetic Strips

Donating Expired Diabetic Strips

We are donating the supplies pictured today to both local and national diabetic charities to help both people and animals affected with diabetes. These supplies are badly needed by those who cannot afford the high cost of testing blood glucose levels. The diabetic supplies donated include Freestyle Lite, Accu-Chek meters and lancets, Truetest test strips, BD alcohol wipes, Gmate test strips, Prodigy Test Strips and Liberty lancets and control solutions. We could not do this important work without your help. Diabetics everywhere thank you! Can Dogs Have Diabetes? Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose—which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder—and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. What Type of Diabetes Do Most Dogs Get? Diabetes can be classified as either Type 1 (lack of insulin production) or Type II (impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone.) The most common form of the disease in dogs is Type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require insulin therapy to survive. Type II diabetes is found in cats and is a lack of normal response to insulin. What Are the Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs? The following Continue reading >>

Spring Cleaning With Diabetes Supplies

Spring Cleaning With Diabetes Supplies

Like me, you probably have a diabetes supply drawer (unofficially) labeled with “I have no idea what to do with these.” We recently asked a question to our Facebook community that read, “Spring is almost here! Are you planning to do some spring cleaning with your diabetes supplies?” and it sounded like the community had some of the same questions I had about best practices for disposing of these supplies. So what are you supposed to do with different diabetes supplies? When it comes to spring cleaning with diabetes supplies there are a few key things to keep in mind. Recycling Keep an eye on the symbols that appear on packages as these may provide guidance on whether or not you can recycle something. If there is a recycling symbol found on the package you should be able to recycle it. You may not have realized that there are many diabetes products that you can recycle such as test strip or infusion set boxes, infusion set cartons, protective plastic needles caps, and paper instructions for use, just to name a few. Check out this website to find a recycling center and local guidelines in your area. Disposing of Needles Most importantly, and possibly most common for people with diabetes, you need to be aware of how to properly dispose of needles. Needles should always be disposed of in a sharps container or container that can’t be easily punctured like a sealed milk carton or laundry detergent bottle (although this might not be allowed where you live, so make sure to confirm what’s allowed in your area first). To learn about your local regulations on throwing away needles, check out this website. Disposing of Electronic Waste Electronic waste can range from an out of warranty MiniLink® transmitter to a blood glucose meter that you don’t use anymore. As a ru Continue reading >>

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

By Nicole Kofman and Kelly Close Twitter Summary: Learn how you can donate your unused diabetes supplies to help save peoples lives around the world: donate at this link. Before insulin was discovered in 1921, a diabetes diagnosis was often a death sentence. Nearly 100 years later, it still is in many places on our planet. This is particularly true in less developed parts of the world, where hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes don’t have access to the most basic life-saving resources that we often take for granted: insulin, strips, and meters. There are several organizations dedicated to bringing these resources to people across the world with diabetes – Life for a Child, Insulin for Life, Team Type 1 Foundation, and Marjorie’s Fund are just a few. We were fortunate to sit down recently with Dr. Mark and Carol Atkinson, President and Director of Insulin For Life USA (IFL USA), to learn more about their work and how people can get involved. We hugely support the work of IFL USA, which gathers unused diabetes supplies from the U.S. and sends them, free of charge, to people in need in disadvantaged regions. You can learn how to donate your unused supplies (insulin, strips, and more) at this link, and read below why and how IFL USA came to be. What amazing efforts the Atkinsons are making – and this is in addition to all that Dr. Atkinson is already doing at the University of Florida and with the nPOD Program. The Problem As Dr. Atkinson outlined in a recent highly praised piece published in the research journal The Lancet, there are several barriers to accessing diabetes supplies, including: High cost of insulin and blood glucose test strips; Insufficient health system resources applied to diabetes; Lack of diabetes education; and Lack of home refrigerati Continue reading >>

Is It Okay To Use Expired Diabetic Test Strips?

Is It Okay To Use Expired Diabetic Test Strips?

Have you ever thought about using expired diabetic test strips to save money? Read this article to find out whether or not it’s a good idea. Diabetic test strips can be expensive. Some of them range up to $2 a piece. And in a box of 50, that can really start to add up. It’s understandable that you’d want to be able to get the most for your money from that. It’s understandable that you’d want to be able to get the most for your money from that. That’s why it can be so frustrating when they reach their expiration date before you’re finished with them and you have to throw them away. When this happens, you’re probably wondering, “What’s the worst that will happen if I use these?” Well, the conversation around expired test strips is actually very lively. Many people have an opinion on whether or not using expired test strips is the right thing to do. We’re here to give you all of the facts, so that you can form an opinion of your own How do diabetic test strips work? In order to understand whether or not you should be using an expired test strip, it can be useful to understand how they work. The basic explanation is this — a liquid-attracting layer moves your blood into the little window on the strip, which is known as the “chemistry strip.” This strip is made up of an enzyme and what’s known as a mediator. The enzyme attaches itself to the glucose in your blood and pulls off sugar electrons. The mediator then passes the enzyme through the circuit to get you your reading. The enzyme is “living,” which is how a diabetic test strip is able to expire in the first place. Eventually, the enzyme will “die,” or break down. And then it will not be able to attach to the glucose in your blood or pull off the sugar electrons. But when exactly do Continue reading >>

More in diabetes