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Dog Diabetes Test Cost

If You Think You Can Not Afford A Dog With Diabetes, Read On And Learn.

If You Think You Can Not Afford A Dog With Diabetes, Read On And Learn.

Affording Dog Diabetes Treatment Special December Offer Canine First-Aid Handbook Get first-aid information to help avoid unecessary Vet appointments and charges. Click for info. Jazz wrote "Thank you very much for your information." Jane wrote "Thank you so much. I needed diet advice on the diet for my diabetic dog. She is 11 years old and recently diagnosed with diabetes. My vet said it was ok feed her potato, but I now know this is not true!" Brad wrote "I wish I had known about this information when my dog was first diagnosed. My dog has been on insulin for about 17 months and I was specifically looking for information on preparing food myself as my dog is going off the food I purchase from the vet." Margaret wrote "My Westie was diagnosed in January and I was carrying a vial of honey in my pocket along with treats and poo bags. I was really terrified of her having a hypo but your information showed me how easy it can be. Thank you sooooo much." Treating Canine Diabetes Need Not Be Expensive, in Time or Money. Relax, We Have The Solutions You Seek. You may not be aware of the diabetes symptoms dogs exhibit, or even that dogs can become diabetic... ...until a pet of yours is diagnosed with diabetes. But relax. You are not alone and help is at hand. The information you need is just minutes away. Dear fellow diabetic dog owner, If your pet has been diagnosed with diabetes, and only now are you beginning to realize the true cost, in time as well as money, please do not fret or worry. You are not the first person this has happend to and you most certainly will not be the last. We have helped hundreds of diabetic dog owners worldwide overcome what seems to them impossible situations. Financial burdens, unable to administer insulin, can't work out a good diet, problems get Continue reading >>

My Dog Has Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Today

My Dog Has Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Today

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My dog has been diagnosed with diabetes today Hi everyone I'm completely new to diabetes looking for some guidance and help with this, my 11yr old border collie Issabella has been diagnosed with diabetes and today we gave her the first insulin injection . Our main concern after her well being is the cost of this illness and it's treatment . At the present time it's costing 60 approx per two weeks for syringes and insulin ,never mind vets fees blood tests etc any advice on how we could save on the cost would be greatly appreciated . Do you have pet insurance, most policies will cover you for conditions like diabetes. see the chemist to buy it over the counter, it has to be cheaper than a vet, or is it restricted? does the UK have a junkie needle exchange program? you should be able to get free needles That's a shame, my brothers dog broke it's leg and the vet bill was 4800, as he had insurance they paid for the treatment. I'm not too sure how you could reduce the costs, have you thought about asking the vet if they can help reduce the costs considering your dog will need insulin for life, failing that the PDSA might be able to help or advise you. Meant to say, I'm sorry about your dogs diagnoses. Hi jack412 no we cannot get free needles but I have found that I can purchase them cheaper on line , as she needs 2 injections daily it's going to be quite costly . I don't believe I can purchase the insulin from a chemist in the UK , it's quite annoying that if I was a junkie I would get free syringes ! That's a shame, my brothers dog broke it's leg and the vet bill was 4800, as he had insurance they paid for the treatment. I'm not too sure how you could redu Continue reading >>

Feeding And Treating Your Diabetic Pet

Feeding And Treating Your Diabetic Pet

If your dog or cat is diagnosed with diabetes, this will mean a lifetime of treatment for your pet, starting with insulin injections. When caring for a diabetic dog or cat, pet owners also must pay closer attention to their pet’s diet. There are a lot of important things to consider when feeding your four-legged family member suffering from diabetes, even if your pet is just starting to show early signs of this disease. Symptoms of Diabetes Diabetes is a medical condition where your pet’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. There are a few telling signs your dog or cat could have diabetes. Increased Urination Increased Thirst Increased Appetite Weight Loss Caring for a Pet with Diabetes There are several areas you’ll want to keep a close eye on when feeding a canine or feline suffering from diabetes. Below are some key points to remember: Watch water intake. First, a major symptom of diabetes is when your pet drinks abnormally large amounts of water. Even after diagnosis, keep and eye on how much your pet drinks. Get in a routine. Feed your pet the exact recommended amount of food ever day. Also, find a mealtime for your pet and stick to it. Sweat with your pet. Make sure your dog or cat is getting regular exercise to help reach a healthy body weight. Then keep exercising to maintain that weight. Inquire before the injection. It’s important your pet actually eats his or her meal to keep a consistent blood sugar level. If your pet doesn’t eat, contact your vet before giving your dog or cat an insulin shot. Track treatment. Keep a very close record of your pet’s meals and insulin injections. If friends or family must care for your pet, ask they do the same. It’s important to eliminate any chance of an accidenta Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Overview Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease with a lot of variables. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin (Type I) or an inadequate response to insulin (Type II). Insulin is an anti-diuretic hormone whose job is to control the kidney’s absorption of water. Mellitus Diabetes (Type I) is characterized by insulin deficiency. This is the most common form of the disease, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require ongoing, life-long insulin therapy in order to survive. Insipidus Diabetes(Type II) is characterized by an inadequate response to insulin. Symptoms The following symptoms could be an indication that your dog has diabetes. Weight loss Increased urination Change in appetite Excessive thirst Unusually breath smell Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Vomiting Cataract formation Skin problems Note: If your dog shows any of these symptoms it's important to visit your veterinarian immediately for tests. Treatment The management and prevention of dog diabetes starts with a proper diet. For most dogs, insulin injections are necessary for adequate regulation of blood glucose. Once your pet’s individual insulin treatment is established, typically based on weight, you’ll be shown how to give him insulin injections at home. Cost to Treat: If your dog requires insulin to treat diabetes you can expect to pay $60 to 100 per month. Related Content Common Pet Health Problems Continue reading >>

How Much Does Dog Diabetes Cost To Manage?

How Much Does Dog Diabetes Cost To Manage?

Pet owners worry about the cost of caring for dog diabetes. Test strips, insulin, needles and special diets cost money. Learn the average cost of managing dog diabetes and what you should expect. Mild cases of dog diabetes are treated simply by changing the dog's diet and increasing his exercise. If this alone doesn't stabilize blood sugar levels, you will need to give your dog insulin injections. Some dogs need one insulin injection per day, but larger dogs often need two doses. This will depend on the type of insulin and the size of the dog. Dietary Restrictions for Dog Diabetes Dogs must be given a diet that is high in fiber and protein. Foods should not be high in carbohydrates or high in fat. Feed your dog three times a day to keep his blood sugar levels optimized. Half an hour after your dog's first meal, administer the injection of insulin. You will need to test your dog's blood sugar levels every day to monitor insulin levels. This helps you understand when the insulin dosage needs to be altered. Cost of Dog Diabetes Testing Supplies When caring for a dog with diabetes, testing and insulin administration remains key to keeping your dog healthy. Your veterinarian will go over a plan of action with you, but there are tips you should know. You'll be testing your dog's insulin levels a minimum of once per day. The test strips usually come 50 to a box and cost upwards of $35. These strips are key in determining how much insulin is necessary. Make sure you always use the correct syringe and needle. 40 U/ml insulin needs a U-40 syringe just like 500 U/ml insulin needs a U-500 syringe. Using the wrong syringe size will lead to an improper dosage that could kill your dog. Before giving your dog the insulin, double check the expiration date. If it's past, throw it out and Continue reading >>

What Tests Are Needed To Diagnose Diabetes In Dogs

What Tests Are Needed To Diagnose Diabetes In Dogs

Canine diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder of the endocrine system that occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce an adequate supply of insulin, or alternatively when a dogs cells are unable to take up the insulin that is produced. If your dog is showing clinical signs that are suggestive of diabetes mellitus, your veterinarian will run a series of tests to confirm the diagnosis. Several other diseases can cause the same or similar symptoms as canine diabetes mellitus, so several tests are usually necessary to rule out other conditions and to confirm a definitive diagnosis of diabetes. Your veterinarian will conduct a thorough physical examination to assess your dogs general health. She probably will ask you about any changes in your dogs behavior and body, such as increased or decreased urination, thirst or appetite, weight loss or lethargy, among other possible signs. Some tests are fairly standard in the assessment of diabetes. A urine sample will be collected and tested for the presence of glucose or bacteria in the urine. A bladder or urinary tract infection can mimic the clinical signs of diabetes, but also commonly accompanies the disease. Blood samples will be analyzed for a number of things, especially for the levels of blood glucose, cholesterol and liver enzymes. Your dog likely will need to fast for 12-24 hours before this particular blood test, to ensure accurate results. A single blood test may not be sufficient for a definitive diagnosis, so additional tests may be necessary. Some other things your veterinarian may recommend include abdominal ultrasound and assessment of serum thyroid hormone concentration, serum pancreatic enzyme levels, blood progersterone concentration in intact female dogs, and/or bacterial culture of the urine. If blood and Continue reading >>

Instant Pet Diabetes Test Kits

Instant Pet Diabetes Test Kits

Pet diabetes test kits for dogs and cats instantly tell sugar level in urine. Now you can monitor your dog or cat's blood-sugar level whether treating with insulin or a natural remedy for diabetes -- or transitioning off insulin entirely as recommended by your holistic veterinarian. These diabetes test kits for dogs and cats indicate glucose levels in the urine, which alert you to needed blood-sugar adjustments. Tests are clean and easy to give, and simple to interpret. When using the instant diabetes home urine testing kit along with our Primalix Blood-Sugar Balance, you can keep your pet out of the danger zone for a lifetime. If your pet has not been diagnosed with diabetes, but you believe a "preliminary indication" may be helpful, the test will point you in the right direction. The test does not replace diagnostic services of a licensed veterinarian, but for about $6 per test you can begin formulating your own best treatment plan for you and your diabetic dog or cat. Paw Check - Instant Diabetes Home Urine Testing Kit for DOGS (2 Tests per Package) D-I-S-C-O-N-T-I-N-U-E-D $12.95- No additional shipping cost when included with additionalitem(s) in your order. Please note: This item may not be returned or exchanged. D-I-S-C-O-N-T-I-N-U-E-D (Cats only) Paw Check - Instant Diabetes Home Urine Testing Kit for CATS (2 Tests per Package) $12.95- No additional shipping cost when included with additionalitem(s) in your order. Please note: This item may not be returned or exchanged. "I have a 13 year old mixed Shepherd/Hound with 2 bulging disks, arthritis in his hips and cataracts that are starting to form. He has done a 180 since the first week of being on your products. He is playful and wagging his tail much more often than he has been over the past couple of years. I am Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Illustration of a dog's pancreas. Cell-islet in the illustration refers to a pancreatic cell in the Islets of Langerhans, which contain insulin-producing beta cells and other endocrine related cells. Permanent damage to these beta cells results in Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, for which exogenous insulin replacement therapy is the only answer. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called "juvenile diabetes", is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must replace the insulin the pancreas is no longer capable of producing for the body's needs. Dogs can have insulin-dependent, or Type 1, diabetes; research finds no Type 2 diabetes in dogs.[1][2][3] Because of this, there is no possibility the permanently damaged pancreatic beta cells could re-activate to engender a remission as may be possible with some feline diabetes cases, where the primary type of diabetes is Type 2.[2][4][5] There is another less common form of diabetes, diabetes insipidus, which is a condition of insufficient antidiuretic hormone or resistance to it.[6][7] This most common form of diabetes affects approximately 0.34% of dogs.[8] The condition is treatable and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life.[9] If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis, dehydration, and death.[10] Diabetes mainly affects mid Continue reading >>

3 Things Your Vet Might Not Tell You About Treating Your Diabetic Dog

3 Things Your Vet Might Not Tell You About Treating Your Diabetic Dog

3 Things Your Vet Might Not Tell You About Treating Your Diabetic Dog Diabetic dogs can live happy and healthy lives, but you may need to do additional research when learning how to manage their care. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, diabetes affects approximately one in every 500 dogs. Chuck, my senior Pug mix, was diagnosed with the disease shortly after I adopted him. He was 10 years old and severely overweight when he camefrom the shelter. Although I did get his weight down by 25 percent thanks to a lot of walks, all that extra heft undoubtedly contributed to the onset of his disease. (Please dont let your dogs get fat , its so dangerous to their health!) When your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, there is a ton of information to learn. Yet, there are quite a few things you may justtake at face value without even thinking to question. Trust me, dont do that. Always be inquisitive. Here is what I learned by managing Chucks diabetes. Chuck was 10 when diagnosed and is 12 years old now. (Photo byAmber Avines) When Chuck got his first insulin prescription, it was for Humulin N. I went to Costco and paid $130 for a bottle that would last a month. Over the next few days, I did some research and discovered Chuck could be moved to Novolin N (a different type of insulin). This is an equally expensive drug, but I finally found it for $24.88 at my local Walmart. Never underestimate the value of shopping around. Pharmacies frequently have contracts with certain drug companies that affect which drugs they sell and how much they cost. When your dog is diagnosed, invest the time into exploring your medication options. When asked, Chucks vet didnt even know there were two insulins (she just jotted down the one she knew about), and it took some independent r Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Test Your Dog For Diabetes

5 Reasons To Test Your Dog For Diabetes

Did you know that some authorities feel that 1 out of every 100 dogs that reaches 12 years of age develops diabetes mellitus1? Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a hormonal problem where the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, the hormone that helps push sugar (“glucose”) into the body’s cells. Without the insulin, the body’s cells are starving for sugar; unfortunately, this then stimulates the body to produce more and more sugar (in an attempt to feed the cells). That’s why your dog’s blood sugar is so high (what we call a “hyperglycemia”) with diabetes mellitus. Without insulin, the sugar can’t get into the cells; hence, why you need to give insulin to your dog with a tiny syringe twice a day. In dogs, this is a disease that can be costly to treat and requires twice-a-day insulin along with frequent veterinary visits for the rest of your dog’s life. So how do you know if your dog has diabetes? Clinical signs of diabetes mellitus in dogs include: Dilute urine Muscle wasting Ravenous appetite Frequent urinary tract infections Weakness Unkempt or poor hair coat Blindness secondary to cataracts Neuropathies (nerve problems) As your dog gets older, it’s worth talking to your veterinarian about doing routine blood work to make sure your dog is healthy. This blood work will help rule out kidney and liver problems, anemia, infections, electrolyte problems and diabetes mellitus. The sooner you recognize the clinical signs, the sooner your dog can be treated with insulin and the less complications we see as a result. So, if you notice any of the signs above, get to a veterinarian right away. Now, continue on for 5 important reasons to test your dog for diabetes: Diabetes mellitus can shorten the lifespan of your dog, as secondary complications and infections Continue reading >>

It Costs What To Treat A Diabetic Pet?

It Costs What To Treat A Diabetic Pet?

Pet diabetes is more common than you may think. Statistics show that up to 1 in 500 dogs and up to 1 in 200 cats become diabetic. Whenever I diagnose a pet with diabetes, I discuss the costs of ongoing care with clients, as they will likely need to budget for diabetic supplies. In general, there are monthly costs (insulin, syringes, test strips, perhaps an increased cost of food relative to the prior food), and there are the initial costs of diagnosis and equipment (glucose meters, test strips, sometimes urine strips). If a pet is diagnosed when ill with a complication, such as diabetic ketoacidosis, the initial costs could escalate quickly. Each situation is different. Each patient is different. Medicine is an art. You are unlikely to find 2 veterinarians who will treat any given patient exactly the same way. Some veterinarians (like me) ask clients with a diabetic pet to get a glucose meter and do the blood glucose curves at home. I find the results can be more accurate at home as the pet typically eats more normally at home than in a clinic setting. In addition to the improved results, the cost of glucose curves goes down significantly. I’ve worked in many practices over the years and have seen a blood glucose sample cost anywhere from a mere $8 to a whopping $49 per blood glucose sample. Most veterinary clinics charge somewhere between $10 and $20 per sample. By the time a vet has checked 6 to 8 blood glucose samples and hospitalized a pet for the day, it could end up costing up to $200 for a glucose curve. A client can purchase a glucose meter and 50 test strips for about the cost of one glucose curve in a hospital setting. Some diabetics are relatively simple uncomplicated patients. Others may make their veterinarians want to pull their hair out! If your diabeti Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog

The Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog

Here, the cost of having a diabetic dog will be discussed. Insulin Dogs that are diabetic are unable to regulate their blood sugar after meals, due to insufficient insulin in their bloodstream. Therefore, pet owners must inject insulin into their pets once or twice daily. The amount of insulin required will depend both on dog’s size, and the severity of his or her diabetes. The monthly cost of insulin for most pet owners ranges $20 - $90. Syringes Insulin is injected with a sterile syringe, which cannot be reused. Depending how much insulin is required by your pet, the monthly syringe cost is $8 - $16. Glucose Meter Pet owners have one of two options: they can purchase a glucose meter for testing their pets at home, or travel to the veterinarian for low-cost testing. The cost of a glucose machine ranges from $20 - $500, whereas owners will spend $10 - $40 per month (not to mention time spent driving) when performing testing at the veterinarian’s office. Lancets / Test Strips There are two methods for testing a dog’s blood sugar at home: via blood or urine. A blood test requires both lancets and testing strips, while a urine test may be more difficult to perform, but is painless. Altogether, pet owners can expect to pay $5 - $15 per month on these supplies. Diabetic Dog Food The cost of diabetic dog food is difficult to factor, because dogs must eat regardless of whether they are diabetic. However, dog food that is specifically suited for diabetic animals can be more expensive than a regular dog food formula. For instance, Hill’s Prescription Diet for Digestive / Weight / Glucose Management costs $80 for a 27.5 lb bag. Veterinary Visits Diabetic dogs will also cost require more veterinary visits than the average dog. Insulin prescriptions must be written every 3 Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs - Testing And Monitoring

Diabetes In Dogs - Testing And Monitoring

By Kristiina Ruotsalo, DVM, DVSc, Dip ACVP, Margo S. Tant BSc, DVM, DVSc, &Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Diagnosis What tests are suggested for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in dogs? Generally, the following screening tests are performed when diabetes mellitus is suspected: a complete blood count (CBC), a serum biochemistry profile, and a urinalysis. Why so many tests? Can't diabetes be diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar value alone? Elevated fasting blood and urine glucose (sugar) values are absolutely essential for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, but other screening tests provide additional information regarding the severity of the diabetes, any conditions that may be contributing to the diabetes, and any complications related to the diabetic state. Because diabetes mellitus is usually diagnosed in middle-aged to older dogs, your dog may have other unrelated conditions that need to be managed along with diabetes. The screening tests will usually alert us to any such conditions. What might a CBC reveal if my dog has diabetes mellitus? The complete blood count (CBC) evaluates the red blood cells, the white blood cells, and the platelet components of a blood sample. With uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, these components are often within the normal range. However, changes may occasionally be seen in the red or white cell values. Despite drinking large quantities of water, diabetic dogs lose body water because they produce such dilute urine. Therefore, your dog may actually be dehydrated. Dehydration can be indicated on the CBC by increases in the packed cell volume (PCV - the proportion of the blood volume that is actually occupied by red blood cells) as well as increases in the total red blood cell count. In some severe diabetic states, lysis (ruptu Continue reading >>

How To Save On Dog Insulin

How To Save On Dog Insulin

Has your dog been newly diagnosed with diabetes and you're wondering how you are going to be able to afford a daily medication like insulin? Learn some ways you can save money on your dog's insulin and still have enough to buy them that new squeaky toy. Taking care of a diabetic dog can be a costly endeavor. Insulin -- the hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood -- is the most important part of your dog’s treatment, and it can also be the most expensive. But it doesn’t have to be. Here we’ll share some tips for saving money on your dog’s insulin. Typical Insulin Costs for Dogs Insulin can cost anywhere from $30-$150. The price will vary depending on if you buy from your veterinarian, online, or with a pharmacy benefits plan. It will also depend on if you choose a brand name or generic drug. Buying at the Vet vs. Online Purchasing insulin from your veterinarian may seem like the most convenient option, but it is usually not the most cost-effective. This is because the majority of veterinarians and clinics markup their medications -- anywhere from 100% to 160% over wholesale prices. Most vets also charge a $5 to $15 dispensing fee.* Online retailers can keep prices low by buying in bulk and cutting out administrative costs. If you do order insulin online, it will require special overnight shipping, which can sometimes translate into high shipping costs. Insulin must be kept cold, so it requires special packaging and must arrive to its destination quickly. Despite this, buying online will probably still cost less than buying from your vet. Buying Brand Name vs. Generic If you are wondering what the difference is between brand name and generic drugs, the answer is: not much. Generic drugs have the same active ingredients and medicinal effects as their bra Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus is a disease resulting from the body’s inability to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas in response to protein digestion. Normally, proteins are converted to glucose which is then carried into the cells by insulin. When insulin is not produced or cannot be used, cells lose their main energy source and unused glucose builds up in the bloodstream (hyperglycemia). Untreated diabetes can lead to organ failure, blindness, coma and death. Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin. Insulin is required for the body to efficiently use sugars, fats and proteins. There are two types of diabetes, with the most common striking 1 of every 500 dogs. Veterinarians commonly diagnosis canine diabetes in patients that are middle-aged, female, and overweight. The following symptoms are strong indicators that a pet may have diabetes: Increased appetite Weight loss (with increased appetite) Excessive thirst Excessive urination Bladder or kidney infection Signs of advanced diabetes include: Blindness Anorexia Lethargy Vomiting Cataracts Seizures Collapse Types Diabetes mellitus is grouped into two types based on disease pathology: Type I - The more severe of the two forms. The body is unable to produce insulin. Treatment is with daily injections of insulin. 99% of diabetes in dogs is Type I. Type II - In this form, the body produces insulin, however the cells are unable to use the insulin. Type II can be treated with oral medications. Only 1% of dogs have Type II diabetes. Approximately one in 500 dogs will develop diabetes. The exact cause is unknown, but certain dogs are at increased risk for developing diabetes: Obese dogs Female dogs (twice as likely to develop diabetes) Older dogs (7-9 years) Autoimmune Continue reading >>

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