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Does Weather Affect Diabetes

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

Hot Summer Weather May Affect Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Hot Summer Weather May Affect Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Hot summer weather may affect individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes Exercise is a key component in diabetes management plans, and individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may be more likely to meet their physical activity goals during the summer months when there is plenty of opportunity to spend time outdoors. However, the hot weather may pose certain risks to individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. A recent article published by Fox-31 News Online reported that people with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may be more susceptible to dehydration than those who do not have the disease. The news provider explained that low blood sugar levels may accelerate the rate of dehydration, so it is important for diabetics to stay hydrated throughout the day. Checking your blood sugar is very important because with the extra energy that your body has to use to stay cool, your blood sugar may go down more than it normally would, said pediatrician Cathy Palmier, quoted by the news source. She noted that some individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes have an impaired ability to sweat, which may make them more likely to be affected by even moderate heat. Warm weather may also affect diabetes medications, the news organization stated. Temperatures above 86 degrees may cause abnormal interactions between ingredients in diabetes treatments, which may alter their efficacy. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes who require insulin should store their supplies at room temperature. Bottles of insulin that are not in use can be kept in the refrigerator, but they should be taken out long enough to warm up before they are put to use, the organization says. This is because chilled insulin m Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Weather

Diabetes And Weather

The weather can have a significant impact on people with diabetes as blood glucose levels can be affected in hot and cold weather. In hot weather, the risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia is increased, while people with diabetes tend to have higher HbA1c levels during the winter months. Diabetes and hot weather Hot weather can cause several problems cause for people with diabetes. These include: Increased hypo and hyper risks Dehydration Carrying medication Blood testing Heat exhaustion Increased hypo and hyper risks Hot weather can increase the risk of hypos and hypers for people on blood-glucose lowering medication. Whether it is a blood glucose raising or lowering effect can vary from person to person. According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, the body’s metabolism is higher in hot weather, and this can increase the absorption of medication such as insulin. Increased activity in hot weather can exacerbate this risk, and you should test your blood sugar more often if taking part in exercise or physical activity. You may also need to adjust your insulin levels in hot weather, especially if you are experiencing erratic blood sugar levels. This should be discussed with a member of your health care team. Hypos might be harder to spot in hot weather, and you should take extra care to prevent hypos from occurring. Steps that can be made include: Don’t disregard hypo symptoms – sweating and fatigue, which can occur in hot weather, could be signs of a hypo Take extra care when driving – test your blood before and after each journey, and stop regularly on longer journeys Keep sugar on hand at all times – such as glucose tablets, or some quick-acting carbohydrate Dehydration Hot weather can increase the risk of dehydration, and so can having higher than normal blood Continue reading >>

Hot Weather And How It Affects Diabetes

Hot Weather And How It Affects Diabetes

Diabetes Qld Pharmacist The hot summer ahead may have many impacts on diabetes management for your clients. Oral hypoglycaemic medications, insulin and blood glucose monitoring strips are affected by the heat so may impact people living with diabetes and their care. As the temperature rises, so may the levels of counter regulatory hormones in your clients living with diabetes. Counter regulatory hormones such as catecholamines, growth hormone, cortisol and glucagon may potentially elevate blood glucose levels, impacting glucose management. Higher temperatures may also increase the risk of hypoglycaemia, especially for people living with type 1 diabetes. This may be due to an increase in absorption rate of insulin from the subcutaneous layers. In a study, the absorption of rapid-acting insulin injected subcutaneously was compared at room temperatures of 20°C and 35°C. During a 4-hour period, the rate of insulin disappearance at 35°C was 50 per cent to 60 per cent greater than at 20°C ambient temperature. (1) Another factor to consider which increases risk in high temperatures among people with diabetes is possible abnormalities of the thermoregulatory capacity caused by autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy affects several organ systems, with undesirable outcomes such as hypoglycaemia unawareness and cardiovascular dysfunction. Heat stress intensifies the issues resulting from autonomic neuropathy by affecting body homeostasis (balance within the body), especially for cardiovascular and glycaemia states. (2) Oral medications have a shelf life which represents the time that the active ingredient retains an acceptable potency. At the expiry date, the potency of the medication must be above 90 per cent of the original active ingredient content. Medications are all Continue reading >>

How The Weather Affects Blood Glucose

How The Weather Affects Blood Glucose

The weather can affect your blood glucose control and insulin requirements. Some people experience a sudden decline in their insulin requirements when a long period of cool weather (e.g., winter) is abruptly interrupted by significantly warmer weather. In such individuals, insulin requirements will rise as winter occurs and drop in the summer. The reason for this effect is not completely understood, but may relate to the increased dilation of peripheral blood vessels during warm weather and resultant increased delivery of glucose and insulin to peripheral tissues. People with diabetes who also have the disease lupus erythematosus may experience just the opposite - lower insulin requirements in cold weather and higher requirements in warm weather. If you find your blood glucose suddenly going unusually high or low and the weather is changing, test often and talk with your doctor about adjusting your treatment routine. Tip of the Day courtesy of Dr. Richard Bernstein, author of Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution Reviewed by Francine Kaufman, MD. 4/08 _________________________________________________________________________________ Learn More about the Diabetes DTOUR Diet! Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Weather can change in an instant, and if you live somewhere where it’s 40 degrees one day and 80 the next, then you know exactly what we’re talking about. But did you know that fluctuating temperatures also affect your blood sugar levels? Both hot and cold weather extremes have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Dr. Lori Roust, endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic, explains that “when you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys.” Dr. Roust also says that it’s important for people with type 2 diabetes to try and avoid holiday treats as they tend to be loaded with carbs that cause your blood sugar to rise. Read more about Dr. Roust’s tips here. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Weather

Diabetes And Cold Weather

Cold weather can be fun but can also make blood testing difficult Over the winter months people of all diabetes types tend to have higher HbA1c levels than during the warmer months. With snow, ice and frost all threatening, sugar levels can creep up whilst the temperature drops. With this in mind, we've compiled some tips to help keep your blood glucose levels under control during a cold snap. The cold weather can leave you with cold hands which can make blood testing more difficult. Don't let the cold put you off doing your tests though. Regular testing will help you to catch any highs, or lows, and keep your sugar levels under control. If your hands are cold, try warming them up on a warm mug or on a radiator with a towel or thick clothing over it, before doing your test. Even just a little physical activity each day can help your glucose levels in a number of supporting ways. A little activity each day will help with insulin sensitivity (in all types of diabetes) which can help the body to better regulate sugar levels. Particularly if you are using insulin, keep a watch of your blood sugar levels in case your insulin requirements go down. Bear in mind that activity can affect blood glucose for up to 48 hours. A little bit of exercise helps to keep you warm. We all know that whilst exercising we heat up, but the effects don't stop as soon as we stop exercising. We may feel cooler after stopping, if we've built up a sweat, but the longer term effects of exercise is to help with metabolism which can help to keep our body temperature up even hours after exercise and helps improve fitness levels . If you tend to feel cold during the winter months, a little more activity in your day could be just the thing. The saying 'healthy body, healthy mind' rings true. If you keep y Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Managing Diabetes In Cold Weather

5 Tips For Managing Diabetes In Cold Weather

Over the winter, people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes tend to have higher HbA1c levels than during the warmer summer months, as blood glucose levels can creep up as the temperature drops.1 Help control your blood glucose levels during the cold months with these 5 tips: 1. Help your immune system If people with diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) get the flu, this can weaken the immune system even if your condition is well-managed.2 People with diabetes are more at risk of potentially serious complications of flu infections such as pneumonia. High blood glucose levels, caused by infection, can increase the risk of conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State (HHS).3 The flu vaccination is offered free of charge on the NHS to people with diabetes, to help prevent contracting flu this winter. Contact your GP or healthcare team for further information. 2. Test, Test, Test Cold hands can make blood testing more difficult, but don’t let the cold put you off testing your blood glucose as required! 3. Stay hydrated Keep your fluid levels up during the winter months as being unwell and having diabetes can be made worse if you are not hydrated. Some medications mean you need to eat regularly, so try to eat a little and often. Remember, carbohydrate-based drinks, like milk or juices, may help you manage your blood sugars alongside any medication.4 4.Keep moving Just a little physical activity each day to get you a little bit out of breath, can help your body better regulate blood glucose, keeping you warm and helping your mental health. 1 Don’t be scared by the cold weather, either move your workout indoors or dress properly for an outdoor workout! Physical activity can affect your blood glucose level during and after exercise, so make sure you Continue reading >>

Cold Weather And Your Blood Sugar

Cold Weather And Your Blood Sugar

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Now that winter is upon us in full force, we need to answer the question, “How will my blood sugars react to the cold?” Cold weather, in general, will cause a rise in blood sugars. This is because cold is a stress on the body, and a reaction to stress is that blood sugars can go up. 3 things to remember about cold weather and diabetes 1. Remember not to stay out long in extreme cold, especially if you have any cardiac issues or neuropathy. The cold weather can make blood thicker and more prone to clotting. 2. Higher blood sugars make you “feel” warmer in cold temperatures. This is because sugar content in the blood makes it harder to cool down or freeze. For example, some think this protected the Inuit Indian tribe, as they have a high rate of diabetes and endured extreme temperatures. I can’t quite see the protection factor in diabetes, but it is a different way to look at how our bodies evolved and changed according to the environment. 3. Protect your insulin and testing equipment from extreme cold. Keep these items indoors if possible. If your monitor won’t work, try warming it up under your arm for a few minutes. Sometimes hot tea in a thermos packed with your supplies will prevent freezing. How do you handle the cold this time of year? Leave your thoughts in the comments below. To learn more about this topic: How Weather Changes Can Affect Your Blood Sugar Don't Let Jack Frost Send Your Blood Pressure Soaring Reci Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Winter Hacks: 7 Tips To Staying On Track Cold Weather Season

Diabetes Winter Hacks: 7 Tips To Staying On Track Cold Weather Season

1. Keep your diabetes devices and insulin out of the cold Just like extreme heat, extreme cold can affect your insulin (insulin solutions freeze near 32 degrees Fahrenheit), and we recommend that you avoid exposing your insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor to weather below 34 degrees Fahrenheit. If you’re outside in cold weather, wear your pump close to your body and cover it with an accessory or warm clothing. Just like in heat, freezing temperatures can break down insulin and cause it lose its effectiveness. Make sure your blood glucose (BG) meter is protected in a case, and bundled up too! 2. Protect your immune system Winter is flu season, and when you’re sick, you’re probably stressed, both of which can raise BG levels. Talk to your doctor about whether or not you should be getting an annual flu shot to help protect yourself against the flu. And wash your hands often with soap and water, or keep hand sanitizer nearby, so you don’t spread germs. Just remember, hand sanitizer may have sugar alcohols so could affect your BG readings and dry out your hands, so make sure you wash them before you pull out your meter. If you do get sick, follow sick day rules provided by your healthcare team. 3. Test, don’t guess Dramatic temperature changes may affect your BG levels. As the seasons change, pay close attention to your CGM trend, because you’ll likely be experiencing different activities or schedules than other times during the year. If you notice a change in your BG levels, talk with your healthcare team about adjusting your basal rate or turning on a basal pattern accordingly to help keep your numbers where you want them. 4. Keep your hands warm Cold weather can leave you with cold hands, making testing your BG more difficult. When your hands are warme Continue reading >>

Eight Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cold Weather

Eight Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cold Weather

Eight Ways to Manage Diabetes in Cold Weather Cold weather can throw off your diabetes management. Here are eight ways winter can present a challenge, and what you can do to maintain your blood sugar control. 1. Be aware that cold environments can raise your A1C A1C levels (a measure of average glucose over the previous 23 months) often increase in cold weather. To some degree, bodies seem to do this on their own, perhaps as an evolutionary adaptation that helps raise their freezing point to survive the cold , according to Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD. Pharmacist and diabetes educator Susan B. Sloane says that higher sugars may make you feel warmer in the cold, but they are still unhealthy. Sloane says, Remember not to stay out long in extreme cold, especially if you have any cardiac issues or neuropathy. The cold weather can make blood thicker and more prone to clotting. Diabetes may reduce circulation to feet, leaving them less able to keep warm in cold weather. Winter may increase your chances of infection and nerve pain in your feet. Wear the warmest socks and well-fitting shoes or waterproof boots you can get. Pay extra attention to your foot care ; inspect your feet carefully every day and use moisturizer if the skin is drying (except between the toes). Wear warm gloves or mittens. 4. Keep your diabetes supplies at the right temperature Like extreme heat, extreme cold can affect your insulin and cause your blood glucose monitor to stop working properly. Joslin Diabetes Center advises not leaving supplies in the car in very cold weather. The same applies to insulin vials, pens, and pumps. Cool is generally OK; very cold or freezing is not . Some experts advise keeping a Thermos of warm tea in your diabetes supply case you have one of those, dont you? to keep supplies wa Continue reading >>

Does Climate Affect Diabetes?

Does Climate Affect Diabetes?

I don’t have a simple answer for you. Type 1 diabetes (the kind that occurs during childhood and used to be called “juvenile diabetes”) seems to develop more often in winter than summer, and is more common in areas with cold climates. Among Caucasians, who have a higher risk of type 1 diabetes than any other race, diabetes risk varies geographically, and is generally higher among Northern Europeans than Southern Europeans. While this may suggest that climate is a contributing factor, the experts at Harvard’s Joslin Diabetes Center note that the risk is also high in Sardinia, an island in the warm Mediterranean near Italy, a fact that would seem to contradict the notion that cold climate is a risk factor for diabetes. Weather has no direct effect on diabetes control but can affect it indirectly. While your blood sugar doesn’t go up or down in response to hot or cold outdoor temperatures, weather does have an impact on eating and exercise habits, which can in turn influence how well you’re able to control your blood sugar. Then there is the fact that bad weather can lead to depression and anxiety, which, in turn, can affect blood-sugar management. In the summer, diabetics are among those most likely to suffer as a result of heat stress and high humidity. Another consideration: if you’re on insulin, you have to be very careful of where you store it during hot or cold weather, it will break down and won’t work if it gets exposed to temperature extremes. Andrew Weil, M.D. Continue reading >>

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Back to Living Better Many diabetics are aware stress and illness can cause blood sugar fluctuations, but did you know changes in temperatures can affect blood sugar levels and lead to false readings? Sabrina Rene, M.D., an endocrinologist at Piedmont, explains how temperature can produce blood sugar highs and lows, and how they can affect diabetes testing supplies. Effects of warm weather on diabetics During warmer months, it is especially important for diabetics to stay properly hydrated. Dehydration can cause blood sugar to rise as the glucose in your blood becomes more concentrated. High temperatures can also cause blood vessels to dilate, which can enhance insulin absorption, potentially leading to low blood sugar. It is best for diabetics to stay indoors during the hottest part of the day and monitor blood sugar closely for changes when temperatures start to rise. Ideal storage temperature for diabetic testing supplies Extreme heat and cold can affect insulin, test strips and glucose monitors. Never leave these supplies in a car, no matter what time of year. The meter should also be stored and used in a room that remains between 50 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Rene says it is important to store test strips in a dry, cool place. “You never want to store test strips in your bathroom. The warm, humid atmosphere can damage the strips, causing them to produce false readings,” she says. Vascular problems and temperature changes Patients with vascular problems often do not have proper blood flow, especially to their extremities, and cold weather may exacerbate slow blood flow. Diabetes test strips need a certain level of oxygen and blood flow to accurately calculate the glucose level. The lower these are, the less accurate the reading, says Dr. Rene. Raynaud’s p Continue reading >>

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