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Does Water Dilute Glucose Test

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Your blood sugar level can give your doctor important clues about your health, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) shows how well your body handles sugar from foods. It can tell whether you are at risk for diabetes or if you already have it. A shorter version of an OGTT checks for diabetes during pregnancy. Normally when you eat, your blood sugar rises. Your pancreas, a long gland deep in the belly, releases a hormone called insulin. It helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for energy and storage. Then your blood sugar goes back down to normal. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body uses insulin poorly. Glucose builds up in your blood. This excess sugar can damage blood vessels around your body. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, eye disease, and kidney damage. You might need an oral glucose tolerance test if you: Have a close family member with diabetes Have high triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood) Have polycystic ovarian syndrome (which causes menstrual problems) Delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A shorter version of this test is done between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy to see whether you have gestational diabetes. It's called the oral glucose challenge test. To get an accurate result on the OGTT, eat about 150 grams of carbohydrates each day for 3 days before the test. Don't eat or drink anything except water after about 10 o’clock the night before. You don't need to do any special prep before the pregnancy glucose challenge test. You can eat in the morning. Just avoid foods with a lot of sugar, such as doughnuts or orange juice. You'll get the OGTT at your doctor's office, a clinic, hospital, or lab. Here’s what happens: A nurse or doctor will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm to test your s Continue reading >>

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There’s talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans. It all comes down to this: What it’s really about-the one, single thing it’s about-is lowering that sky-high blood sugar number. That’s it. Everything follows from getting that blood sugar number down. It doesn’t matter how you got there, and it doesn’t matter what you did. What’s important, what’s critical for you right here, right now, is to lower that number. Here are five simple ways to lower your blood sugar. The list doesn’t including the most obvious choices (medication) because you know them already. These are some methods you might not have thought about. 1. Stay on your feet The simple answer that doctors give diabetics (especially type 2s) who want lower their blood sugars is to exercise. And it works! But what if you’re not the exercising type? What if the sight of a treadmill or exercise bike or running shoes gives you the fits? That’s okay, too, actually. You might want to consider simply spending a chunk of each day on your feet. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, simple activities like sweeping the floor or dusting the shelves or taking the dog out for a walk are all healthy ways to stay active. You will burn calories, and you will move that blood sugar number down. 2. Drink water Believe it or not, evidence suggests that staying hydrated can have an effect on blood sugars and whether or not people develop type 2 diabetes. Is the effect it a big one? We’re not sure yet. But a 3,000-person study cited in the New York Times showed that people who drank the most water-17 to 34 ounces a day-were 30 Continue reading >>

Am I Correct That Drinking Water Does Not Help My Blood Sugar Go Down?

Am I Correct That Drinking Water Does Not Help My Blood Sugar Go Down?

Am I correct that drinking water does not help my blood sugar go down? I have type-2 diabetes which I manage by exercise, diet, and, when absolutely necessary, oral medication. Generally my blood glucose control is good, but every so often I go high for one reason or another. The last time it happened I was with another diabetic I know, woffhandedly commented that I'd need to drink a lot of water that day to bring my blood sugar down. I commented that, yes, I probably would be thirsty and need to drink a lot of water, but that the water ingestion itself was not going to be responsible for the lowering of my BG; she disagreed, saying that she believed that the water drinking, in and of itself, would be helpful. I have reactive hypoglycemia and am for all purposes pre-diabetic, so I get crashes as opposed to highs. Water doesn't alleviate my symptoms and I can't think why it would help you OR me. The only things that bring mine back up are eating, or smoking for a quick counter to the adrenaline rush. Unless she's a medical professional, I see no reason to take her seriously. Sounds like she's conflating correlation. 2 I have reactive hypoglycemia and am for all purposes pre-diabetic, so I get crashes as opposed to highs. Water doesn't alleviate my symptoms and I can't think why it would help you OR me. The only things that bring mine back up are eating, or smoking for a quick counter to the adrenaline rush. Unless she's a medical professional, I see no reason to take her seriously. Sounds like she's conflating correlation. You can get an artificially high blood glucose level if you're dehydrated. There's less water in the blood, and since blood glucose is measured by a percent of the volume of the liquid of blood, there would be a greater percentage of glucose in dehydr Continue reading >>

Why No Water? Glucose Test..

Why No Water? Glucose Test..

I have my Glucose test tomorrow... My midwife didn't give me any instructions to do before test...but I'm a STM and I remember not eating after a certain time the night before.. But I don't remember not being allowed to have water?! I've only heard that come up on here... Why would water affect the test? Anyone know.. When I get up to pee at night I usually drink more water... Water was fine with my doc until I actually had the drink. I would assume because it can dilute the drink and affect results but usually water isn't included in fasting so it should be fine night before. I wasn't allowed to eat 1 hour prior to my appt, but was allowed water. Midwife also told me I could sip on water while I was waiting for my blood draw as well. I was allowed to drink water the entire time. Everyone's tests seem to have different rules though! Hmm ok thanks ladies... My midwife never told me this and don't remember it with my first I just know I've seen post on here about it... I just couldn't figure why water would matter! Thanks! :) I didn't have to fast at all but I was not allowed any water or to pee unless I got super sick. And I wasn't allowed to walk around/ leave the room. At least the drink was good. I wish I didn't have to drink it so fast tho haha Continue reading >>

One Hour Glucose Test Instructions

One Hour Glucose Test Instructions

Your one hour glucose test (also called “28 week labs”) can be done at any time of day. Drink all of the glucola beverage within a five minute period. Do not eat or drink other fluids after drinking the glucola. (A small amount of water is okay.) Arrive at the lab (with your lab) slip 40 minutes after you finished drinking your glucola to allow time for check in. Your blood needs to be drawn 1 hour after you have finished drinking the glucola. Bring a high-protein snack (such as crackers and cheese or peanut butter) to eat after your lab is drawn. Please note that although you may eat prior to drinking the glucola it is important not to have eaten sugary foods. This may alter your test results. We will have your test results available at your next scheduled office visit. If your results are abnormal, additional testing will be ordered and we will call you to schedule those tests. Continue reading >>

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

This article was originally from the weekly Diabetes Daily Newsletter. To receive your copy, create a free Diabetes Daily account. Picture a glass of water. Mix in a little sugar and stir until it dissolves. Now place it outside on a hot, sunny day. As the water evaporates, the remaining water gets sweeter and sweeter. If you have diabetes, this happens to your blood when you’re dehydrated. Because your blood is 83% water, when you lose water, the volume of blood decreases and the sugar remains the same. More concentrated blood sugar means higher blood sugars. The lesson: stay hydrated to avoid unnecessary high blood sugars. How Much Water Should I Drink? The average person loses about 10 cups of water per day through sweat and urination. At the same time, you gain fluid from drinking liquids and eating food. So how much you need to drink is a tricky question. You may have heard the “drink 8 glass of water a day” rule. Where did this rule come from? As Barbara Rolls, a nutrition research at Pennsylvania State University says: “I can’t even tell you that, and I’ve writen a book on water!” It turns out that there’s no basis for this in the medical literature. The easiest way to tell is looking at your urine. If it’s a little yellow, you’re probably hydrated. If it’s darker, then you need to drink more fluids. You can also go with your own intuition. Are you thirsty? Drink! If you’re busy or stuck at a desk for long periods, make sure you have a water bottle so you can easily answer when your body calls for water. Does Coffee or Tea Count? Yes! Although consuming caffeine can cause your body to shed some water, you still gain more water than you shed. And studies have shown that this effect is partically non-existent for people who drink caffeine re Continue reading >>

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

June 30, 2011 (San Diego) -- Drinking about four or more 8-ounce glasses of water a day may protect against the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), French researchers report. In a study of 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the start of the study, those who reported that they drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next nine years than those who said they drank 16 ounces or less daily. The analysis took into account other factors that can affect the risk of high blood sugar, including sex, age, weight, and physical activity, as well as consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Still, the study doesn't prove cause and effect. People who drink more water could share some unmeasured factor that accounts for the association between drinking more water and lower risk of high blood sugar, says researcher Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Hospital Bichat in Paris. "But if confirmed, this is another good reason to drink plenty of water," he tells WebMD. The findings were presented here at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. About 79 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to result in a diagnosis of diabetes, according to the CDC. It raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. An additional 26 million have diabetes, the CDC says. Roussel notes that recent research indicates an association between the hormone vasopressin, which regulates water in the body, and diabetes. Despite the known influence of water intake on vasopressin secretion, no study has investigated a possible association between drinking water and risk of high blood sugar, he Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Water Dilute A Pregnancy Test?

Can Drinking Water Dilute A Pregnancy Test?

Can Drinking Water Dilute A Pregnancy Test? So you plan to take a pregnancy test at home. Thats great. But suddenly a question pops into your mind. Can drinking water dilute a pregnancy test? When you are going to take your pregnancy test for the first time, youd feel more nervous than ever. It is natural. There is a storm of questions raging in your mind. When should I take the pregnancy test, which is the best pregnancy test, At what time should I take the pregnancy test, etc. To make matters worse, there are certain things that we should do and other things we should avoid. There are so many things thatcan corrupt the pregnancy test without your knowledge. So it is equally important to know What are the things that manipulate the pregnancy test. One must consciously avoid them. One such doubt is that can drinking water dilute a pregnancy test? Yes, certainly the water that dilutes everything can dilute a pregnancy test. Can drinking water dilute a pregnancy test? When you drink excess water, your body gets more fluid. This fluid is less in osmotic pressure (it has fewer solutes and is pure) and hence this disturbs your body composition. Your body has to balance all that goes inside and so it wants to expel the water out. So the kidneys start filtering the water and more diluted urine is excreted. When you are pregnant your body has just started making the hCG hormone . So it is in very minimal amounts even in a large volume of your urine. Kidneys concentrate urine overnight as they keep reabsorbing the urine. The reason being that you dont pee and the body needs water. This makes even a low level of hCG detectable. Once you drink more water, the entire hCG will be like a drop in the sea and hence hard to detect! Why do I feel like going to pee often during pregnancy Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Tests: What Exactly Do They Involve?

Glucose Tolerance Tests: What Exactly Do They Involve?

Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) are used to measure how well the body can process a larger amount of sugar. If the blood sugar measured in the test is above a certain level, this could be a sign that sugar is not being absorbed enough by the body’s cells. Diabetes or gestational diabetes might be at the root of this problem. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar levels are often higher due to changes in the metabolism during pregnancy – but they usually come back down again after the child is born. What types of glucose tolerance tests are there? There are two types of glucose tolerance tests: a short version called the glucose challenge test, and a full glucose tolerance test. The short version is easier to do and serves as a preliminal test to determine someone's risk of diabetes or gestational diabetes. Glucose challenge test The glucose challenge test is the short version of the glucose tolerance test. The test can be done at any time of the day. It involves drinking a glass of concentrated glucose solution (50 g of glucose dissolved in 250 to 300 ml of water). After one hour has passed, a blood sample is taken to determine the blood sugar level. Glucose tolerance test For this test, you should not eat anything before going to the doctor in the morning. In other words, you should not have breakfast, and you should eat your last meal the evening before. This also applies to all drinks with the exception of water. First of all, blood is taken to determine your baseline blood sugar level. The blood is drawn from a vein or your fingertip or earlobe. After that you drink a large glass of concentrated sugar solution. In the glucose tolerance test, 75 g of glucose are dissolved in 250 to 300 ml of water. The amount given to children is based on their body weight. If Continue reading >>

Drinking Water Before Fasting Sugar Check Up

Drinking Water Before Fasting Sugar Check Up

drinking water before fasting sugar check up pls tell..i use to drink 1 litre water early morning as i got up..after drinking water if i check my fasting then it will affect the readings..i mean it will increase or decrease the reading as an effect of water consumption.. If you drink water, the same will be absorbed in the blood. If your blood sugar is 180 mg/dL or above, the excess glucose will be leaked out along with urine. However drinking of water before the test will affect fasting blood sugar level. One glass of water is ok.. one liter of water will dilute 5 liter body blood .. say by 20 %...Hence it might show less fasting sugar by approx 20 %...If actual is 100 Mg/dl... it might show 80... Too mathematical. The water will be absorbed gradually and the speed of absorption will depend upon body requirement. Any excess water will be passed in urine. However these are technical questions. Someone should study the effect of excessive water drinking on bs. Thyrocare suggested, can drink only one glass of water before giving sample in the morning.and it is better you don't drink at all to know your precise values. This also applies when you check on home glucose meter. When you drink a lot, youre not going to increase your blood volume that much. As soon as the water you drank started getting absorbed, your body would sense it, and start excreting dilute urine to keep your salt concentrations ok. Drink too fast, and before your blood is diluted to any real extent, youll have brain swelling, seizures, coma and death because you screwed up your sodium level. Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

The answer is yes, indirectly it will reduce insulin resistance and help a person reduce their hunger. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day appears to bring down one's blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance due to proper hydration. While at the same time the more water you drink the less hungry a person is so they tend to eat less during the day, similar to drinking a glass of water prior to eating fills the stomach causing a person who is dieting to reach satiation (fullness) sooner. If your blood sugars are very high and your kidney is not able to process all the sugar, water will help remove the excess sugar and ketones out of your system. Drinking water is important for everyone but for diabetics, especially type 1 diabetics, it is crucial to remove excess ketones from the blood stream and reduce dehydration when blood sugars are high. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

This board covers the second and third trimesters (week 13 onwards). Visit our Pregnancy section for more tips and advice. You can even sign up for our week by week pregnancy emails . Or if you are looking for other members with babies due at the same time, pop in to our Pregnancy and Due Date Clubs forum where you can meet other mums who are due when you are. Hi ladies, i have been booked in for this test on tuesday and was wondering if any of you had been for it, how long does it take and what does it involve? is it a proper blood test or do they just do the finger prick ( i hate needles!! lol) any advice much appreciated just so i know what to expect x I have had 2. I believe it is slightly different when testing for normal diabetes, but for gestational diabetes they give you a proper blood test, then you drink a really horrid sugary drink, make you sit there for 2 hours, and then take another full bloodtest. It is supposed to calculate how well your system processes the sugar in the drink. I find it really difficult because I have suffered from severe morning sickness with both pregnancies, so the not eating for 12 hours before hand thing it really hard. Also if you are sick during the test it negates it and you have to do it again. Sorry not to be more positive. Good luck. I have no idea but I am getting mine done in a few weeks and will be interested in what people have to say about it I had to go for it too. I had to fast from 10pm the night before and be in for 9ish. They took my bloods (through the vein not the finger prick) and then I had to drink the glucose drink. Its not very pleasant and I was actually sick after it (lol) so they had to abandon the test I think the procedure after it if i wasnt sick was to take another set of bloods an hour after then ano Continue reading >>

Water During 3 Hour Glucose Test?

Water During 3 Hour Glucose Test?

Were you ladies allowed to drink water during the 3 hour? I usually drink water allll day long and they told me no water during the 1 hour bc it can dilute the sugary drink and skew results. I can't imagine not being able to drink any water during the 3 hour! my doc said no food or drink after midnight the night before the 3 hour test. so no water for like half a day. seems like torture.... my doc said no food or drink after midnight the night before the 3 hour test. so no water for like half a day. seems like torture.... @elonimes I was allowed sips but that was it @elonimes I was allowed 8 oz over the course of the three hours. @elonimes I was allowed water only for 12 hrs before my test. During the test I was allowed sips. @elonimes I was not allowed any water at all during the test. I was absolutely dehydrated and was sick the whole day! @elonimes I was allowed one water bottle during my 2 hr glucose test... But told no more than that because it can dilute it... I was allowed one cup of water as well and that was it. I was told I could have water during my 1 hour... It IS torture! I was so dehydrated they had a hard time even finding my veins. As a result I look like a pregnant junkie : / @elonimes During the 3 hour I asked about drinking water, the lab person said go for it! No limits on it. I didn't have anything from midnight to 8 am prior to starting the test though. @elonimes You cannot eat or drink at all!!! I was allowed 8oz which seemed like nothing!!! So thirsty after drinking that sugar drink. @elonimes They let me sip the water during 3hr test.... I failed too.. @elonimes I was told to drink as much water as I could handle. I had my lab done at the hospital and not a LabCorp like place and it was much better. @elonimes My doctor has told me NOT to change Continue reading >>

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

A fasting blood sugar level is usually ordered by a physician either to check for a new diagnosis of diabetes or to monitor a person who is known to have diabetes. Ideally fasting blood sugar is tested shortly after you get up in the morning, 8 to 12 hours after eating or drinking anything other than water. The normal range is from 70 to 99 mg/dL. Levels above 100 mg/dL may indicate impaired glucose metabolism. Various factors can affect fasting blood sugar levels. Any foods eaten within 8 hours of the test may cause glucose levels to be elevated. After food is digested, higher levels of glucose remain in the blood for some time. Alcoholic beverages consumed even the night before the test may cause a drop in blood sugar. Medications such as corticosteroids, estrogen -- present in birth control pills, some diuretics, certain antidepressants, anti-seizure medication and even plain aspirin can increase glucose levels. Glucose levels can be decreased by medications that include insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents, anabolic steroids and even acetaminophen. Exercise can cause an increase or a decrease in blood sugar levels. During exercise, insulin becomes more efficient. This effect can persist, lowering blood sugar levels for hours afterward. An hour of afternoon exercise may lower glucose levels until the next morning, affecting the fasting blood sugar test. Exercise can also affect glucose levels by releasing adrenaline. This raises blood sugar temporarily. Physical exertion or other activities that cause excitement may increase fasting sugar levels if performed shortly before the test. Many medical conditions can affect blood sugar levels, such as liver disease, disorders of the pancreas and disorders of the thyroid gland. Acute and severe trauma -- such as major surgery, Continue reading >>

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