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Does Type 2 Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit

Disability Tax Credit And Type 1 Diabetes

Disability Tax Credit And Type 1 Diabetes

UPDATE (Oct 24, 2017): JDRF believes the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) interpretation of the rules regarding life-sustaining therapy has now changed, resulting in many Canadians with type 1 diabetes being denied the tax relief they're eligible for under the Disability Tax Credit. On October 20, JDRF addressed members of Canada’s Standing Committee on Finance, advocating to make this benefit more widely available to all Canadians living with type 1 diabetes. The CRA has invited JDRF to meet on October 25 to discuss this issue further. Find out more in this press release. --- Are you eligible for the tax breaks? As everyone living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their caregivers know, managing the disease can be very costly. The Government of Canada offers some help with this expense, because it officially recognizes T1D as a disability. This allows people living with the disease to apply for a Disability Tax Credit (DTC) and leverage other cost-saving programs. What is the Disability Tax Credit? The DTC is a program designed to help those with disabilities or their caregivers reduce the amount of income tax they pay, offsetting some of the significant medical and treatment expenses. To qualify for the DTC, an individual’s health care provider must submit a T2201 form to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), certifying that the disability causes severe and prolonged impairment and describing its impact on their patient’s life. Once approved, the disability amount can be claimed on the individual’s (or their caregiver’s) tax return. “The disability tax credit (DTC) is a nonrefundable tax credit used to reduce the income tax you pay. It's available for people with a severe and prolonged physical or mental impairment, subject to approval by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit?

Does Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit?

Todd Korol/National Post Last week’s Family Finance column profiled a young couple, Tim and Kathleen, and mentioned that Tim’s disability and diabetes qualifies him to open a registered disability savings plan. Eligibility to open an RDSP is dependent on qualifying for the disability tax credit (DTC). That diabetes would entitle an individual to claim the DTC surprised some readers, who asked for clarification. Under the Income Tax Act, the DTC is available to people with a “severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions” which markedly restricts one or more of the individual’s basic activities of daily living or would markedly restrict an activity if it wasn’t for “life sustaining therapy.” Life-sustaining therapy is therapy that an individual requires to support a vital function and is administered at least three times per week for an average of at least 14 hours per week. The purpose of this rule is to allow individuals to be eligible for the DTC if they must have life-sustaining therapy that requires them to dedicate a significant amount of time away from their normal, everyday activities to receive the therapy. In 2005, the tax rules were amended to state that if the therapy has been determined to require a regular dosage of medication that needs to be adjusted on a daily basis, the activities directly involved in determining the appropriate dosage are considered part of the therapy. As a result of this change, a child with Type 1 diabetes who is unable to independently adjust his or her insulin dosage may now qualify for the DTC taking account into time spent by his or her parents in assisting the child to administer the insulin. Since the amendment passed, there have been at least two reported cases in which the CRA challenged the Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credits And Benefits For Diabetes (type 2)

Disability Tax Credits And Benefits For Diabetes (type 2)

Disability Tax Credits and Benefits for Diabetes (Type 2) Up to $40,000 in Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) retroactive tax refunds If you or a family member is disabled with diabetes, you may be eligible for retroactive refunds from your past 10 years of paid taxes up to $40,000. Up to $90,000 when setting up a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) For those taking advantage of the plan, the Canadian government will provide yearly financial support in the form of matching grants up to $3,500 per year and bonds up to $1,000 per year. Contact us for a free consultation with no obligation. When we work with you to obtain retroactive tax refunds, we work on a contingency basis. There is no cost to you unless we obtain a refund. If we are successful, our fee is 25% of the refund. HandyTax works with families members to maximize any tax refund related to a disability family member. Trust HandyTax to communicate with the government and medical staff securely and confidentially. Telephone: 1-888-343-1155 Email: [email protected] Open Daily from 11AM-5PM EST * Voicemails are generally returned within 24 hours HandyTax has had success in the past helping disabled Canadians with diabetes get retroactive disability tax credit refunds from the Canada Revenue Agency. Tax refunds depend on your personal situation and actual refunds can range anywhere below, $40,000. The entire process takes between 3 and 9 months to complete as communication between the CRA and your qualified practitioner are the source of the varying time periods to completion. If you suffer from diabetes, you may qualify for the Disability Tax Credit under more than one category, including, but not limited to, walking, dressing, feeding and mental functions. Type-2 diabetes is not the same as type-1 diabetes, in tha Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit

Disability Tax Credit

What is the Disability Tax Credit? The Disability Tax Credit is a credit offered by Revenue Canada to those of who have a severe mental or physical impairment which markedly restricts the basic activities of daily living and/or need and dedicate time for Life Sustaining Therapy (Therapy that must occur at least 3 times per week for more than 14 hours per week). They further require that the person eligible have an impairment that has lasted or is expected to last for a period of 12 continuous months. Further Revenue Canada notes "For the purposes of the disability amount, Life Sustaining Therapy is any treatment for a disease or a disorder that, if withheld would prevent the functioning on one or a group of vital organs to sustain human life." There are some who do not wish to be labelled as "disabled" or have their child carry such a label. I respect that but for myself and others, any financial relief provided by the Federal government is accepted and desired. Please note...that CRA has reverted to its pre-May 2017 policy regarding people living with diabetes who apply for the Disability Tax Credit. They are also currently reviewing applications that were denied after that date. We would also ask that you continue make your MP aware of this issue. Who Can Apply? The Disability Tax Credit is available to those who have a taxable income and who are markedly restricted in the Basic Acts of Daily Living OR require 14 or more hours per week to administer Life Sustaining Therapy. My child or I have Type 1 Diabetes. Do either of us qualify? Yes! While the qualification criteria for a child under 18 is slightly different from that of an adult, if both of you are intensively managing your diabetes care (you are using MDI or an insulin pump), you most likely will qualify. Child Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Cra To Review Disability Tax Credit Applications After Backlash From Diabetics

Cra To Review Disability Tax Credit Applications After Backlash From Diabetics

After months of criticism and accusations it lied to disability advocates, the Canada Revenue Agency is reverting to a previous interpretation of a tax credit used by diabetics and will review applications denied since May 2017. Liberal MP Kamal Khera, the parliamentary secretary for the minister of national revenue, said the government is sorry for the confusion. "When there's an apology due we do apologize," Khera told CBC News Network's Power & Politics. When asked if something went wrong, she said yes. Since the spring, people with Type 1 diabetes have complained that they have been turned down for the disability tax credit — even if they had been approved in previous years. To qualify for the credit, the CRA requires adults with Type 1 diabetes to spend at least 14 hours a week on activities, specified by the agency, related to administering insulin. A patient's physician must confirm those hours to the CRA. Diabetes Canada and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation obtained an internal CRA memo, dated May 2, 2017, that says: "Unless there are exceptional circumstances, adults with diabetes can generally manage their daily insulin therapy without taking 14 hours per week." In a briefing with reporters Friday morning, officials said the CRA will return to using the pre-May 2017 clarification letter for disability tax applications, but reiterated that "no change has been made to the eligibility criteria." It will also proactively review denied applications where the CRA relied on that revised clarification letter to determine eligibility. The CRA says individuals do not need to submit new or additional information unless they are contacted by the agency. In the meantime, a new disability committee will come up with recommendations going forward. Advisory committ Continue reading >>

Cra Reverses Course On Disability Tax Credit Eligibility For Diabetics

Cra Reverses Course On Disability Tax Credit Eligibility For Diabetics

Open this photo in gallery: The Canada Revenue Agency took steps Friday to quell a furor over what critics were calling its heartless treatment of diabetics. Disability advocates and opposition parties have been excoriating the agency for weeks over the fact that hundreds of Canadians with Type 1 diabetes have suddenly found themselves ineligible to claim the disability tax credit, even though they've previously qualified for it. The CRA insisted there's been no change in the eligibility criteria, which requires an individual to spend at least 14 hours a week engaged in activities related to the administration of insulin. But diabetes support groups pointed to a May clarification letter sent by the CRA to doctors who provide the medical information needed to support a claim for the tax credit. That letter said only in "exceptional circumstances" would adult diabetics need 14 hours a week to manage their insulin therapy; most would not – which would mean they're not eligible for the credit. The CRA said Friday that it will revert to the clarification letter that existed prior to May, and review all applications for the disability tax credit that have been denied based on the May letter. Diabetes Canada welcomed the move. Kimberley Hanson, director of federal affairs for the group, said she hopes the review "serves as an opportunity to make the application process clearer for those who need to access this much needed credit and ultimately provides financial relief and fairness for those living with Type 1 diabetes." The advocacy group argues that the disability tax credit is essential to help diabetics pay for medication, medical supplies and devices and that the loss of the credit had caused enormous stress and financial hardship for those affected. Revenue Minister Di Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit 101

Disability Tax Credit 101

Its that time of the year again, the time when the tax man comes to call and we scurry to find any way to hang onto our hard earned dollars that we can. This is also the time of year when I find myself inundated with many questions regarding the Disability Tax Credit (DTC). I am not an accountant. I am not a lawyer. I am a mother who has been dealing with this issue since the beginning of time (or at least early 2000). Back then, the DTC was given to some people with diabetes and denied to others. Eventually it was given to those using insulin pumps but not those on injections. Finally after a long battle, a lot of letters and presentations, this ruling was changed and the discrimination faced by people living with diabetes was removed. The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is given to people who are unable to perform the "basic acts of daily living" OR who require life sustaining therapy. While the argument as been made that people with diabetes are not able to perform the basic acts of daily living, the real case has been made that they require life sustaining therapy. If they do not take insulin they die. Its very simple. So what is the tax credit and why do you want it? Well it gets you money back on your taxes! Again, I am not an accountant but I think of it as my own extra RRSP or spouse to deduct off of my taxable income. If you pay in any income tax, you will see a bit more money coming back to you. If you have no income or very little income, this credit may still be important for you. It may reduce your income to the point that you now qualify for the GST. If you have a child with diabetes, it will mean that he/she now qualifies for a disabled child benefit which adds approximately another $100 to your monthly CTB. There are still many questions from people who are Continue reading >>

Can I Get Disability For Diabetes?

Can I Get Disability For Diabetes?

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed with the condition. Diabetes is a chronic, debilitating – and sometimes fatal – disease, where the body cannot produce an adequate amount of insulin for the body, or can’t correctly utilize the insulin it does produce. Insulin is a vital hormone that regulates blood-sugar levels. Without sufficient supply of insulin, a person risks damaged organs, blood vessels, and nerves. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the body’s immune system mistakenly attacking and killing beta cells in the pancreas. Since beta cells are responsible for distributing insulin into the blood via the pancreas, without their presence, sugar in the blood builds up rather than being used for energy. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated with insulin dosages; careful meal planning can also regulate blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce (called insulin insensitivity). This is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 90% of people with the disease. Depending on the severity, the condition can be managed through meal planning, physical activity, or medications. Diabetes has an array of signs and symptoms, the most common being: Unusual thirst Frequent urination Weight change Extreme fatigue / lack of energy Blurred vision Cuts and bruises that heal slowly Tingling or numbness in hands or feet It’s important to note that these are predominantly Type 1 diabetes symptoms; type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. Canadian Disability Tax Credit for Diabetes While people with diabetes can live an active, independent lifestyle, they’ll nee Continue reading >>

Tax Deductions For Diabetes

Tax Deductions For Diabetes

The IRS allows you to claim a tax deduction for many of the expenses you incur to diagnose, monitor and treat diabetes. If you, your spouse or a dependent suffers from diabetes, it’s likely that you have more medical expenses than the typical person. Fortunately, the IRS allows you to claim a tax deduction for many of the expenses you incur to diagnose, monitor and treat diabetes. However, you must be eligible to itemize to claim the deduction, and even then, only a portion of the expense is deductible. Deductible portion of diabetes expenses Your total deduction for medical expenses, including all costs that relate to diabetes, are only deductible to the extent the total exceeds 7.5 percent of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) for 2017 and 2018. Your AGI is not the same as your taxable income; rather it is your total income less specific types of deductions such as student-loan interest and IRA contributions that are separately listed on the first page of your tax return. To illustrate, suppose your AGI is $30,000. Multiplying this by 7.5 percent gives you $2,250. This means that when you total up all of the medical bills you pay during the year, only the portion that is more than $2,250 can be claimed as a deduction. For example, if your total medical expenses for diabetes and other health-related issues cost $3,800, you can claim a $1,550 deduction. Beginning Jan. 1, 2019, all taxpayers may deduct only the amount of the total unreimbursed allowable medical care expenses for the year that exceeds 10% of their adjusted gross income. Diabetes expenses you can include There are a wide range of expenses that you can include in your medical deduction including the purchase price of blood sugar monitoring kits, test strips, insulin and other medications prescribed by your Continue reading >>

Diabetes Disability Tax Credit

Diabetes Disability Tax Credit

What is Diabetes Diabetes includes both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease which causes a person’s pancreas to stop producing insulin. This can strike suddenly and is not related to one’s diet or lifestyle choices. For this type of diabetes there is no cure, however it can be managed with the right tools. Type 2 diabetes is when your body does not product enough insulin or it does not use the insulin that it makes. Signs & Symptoms of Diabetes (Type 1 & Type 2) Signs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes vary. As mentioned previously, Type 1 diabetes can occur suddenly and can strike children and adults at any age. Symptoms include extreme thirst, frequent urination, drowsiness, increased appetite, sudden weight loss, sugar in the urine, vision loss, heavy breathing, and unconsciousness. Patients with Type 1 diabetes must manage their blood-sugar levels as they are at a higher risk of having a heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputation. Symptoms for Type 2 diabetes include excessive thirst and hunger, sores or cuts that won’t heal, blurry vision, and frequent urination. It is important to note that symptoms for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are very similar. Treatment for Diabetes Although there is no cure for Type 1 diabetes there are still many ways to manage it. In order to live a healthy life it is important to monitor your blood-sugar levels regularly and deliver proper doses of insulin to yourself. To treat Type 2 diabetes it is important to keep your sugar levels in the target range set by your health care provider. It is recommended to eat healthy meals and snacks, regularly exercise, maintain a healthy body weight, take medication prescribed by your doctor, and manage your stress levels. An endocrinol Continue reading >>

Tax Credits & Your Rights

Tax Credits & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada's position on tax credits for people living with diabetes? The Government of Canada should institute a system of enhanced tax credits wherein people with diabetes would be eligible for consideration for a non-refundable tax credit or a refundable payout specifically designed to reduce the burden of higher medical and treatment costs. The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) for Canadians with Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes may be eligible for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) if they meet the eligibility criteria for receiving a life-sustaining therapy. What are the eligibility criteria for the DTC? The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) must receive confirmation that the applicant spends at least 14 hours per week on the activities specified by the CRA (listed below) that are related to administering insulin. Who can apply for the DTC? Parents of children with type 1 diabetes Kids with type 1 diabetes under the age 18 years may be eligible for the DTC, as long as the child’s physician signs the T2201 Disability Tax Credit Certificate to certify that the eligibility criteria are met. Most kids under age 18 qualify for the DTC because the child and parent/guardian time can be combined to meet the 14 hour per week criteria. The CRA will require individuals to reapply when they turn age 18. Adults with type 1 diabetes Adults must discuss their eligibility with their doctor. Many adults with type 1 diabetes do not qualify for the DTC because the CRA has not received adequate information that they spend at least 14 hours per week on the activities specified by the CRA related to administering insulin. The CRA must receive confirmation from physicians that their patients who are applying for the DTC spend at least 14 hours per week on the activities. It may be h Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit + The Price Of T1d In Canada

Disability Tax Credit + The Price Of T1d In Canada

WRITTEN BY: Jen Hanson Editor’s Note: this piece was originally published on the Connected In Motion Blog. Update: On December 4, 2017, Diabetes Canada and JDRF reported: “Internal CRA documents show intent to deny the disability tax credit to Canadians with type 1 diabetes.” Read below for ways to raise your voice in opposition. Outside of November (World Diabetes Month), it’s not that often that Type 1 diabetes hits the mainstream media. This past week though, if you’ve been anywhere near the TV news, talk radio, or a Facebook feed, you’ve probably heard that the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) has made drastic cuts in approvals of Disability Tax Credit applications for adults living with Type 1 diabetes. This has been done without any substantiated explanation or evidence to support that any Type 1 diabetes therapy requires fewer than 14 hours per week to manage – the standard being used for approval of the credit. The CRA denial documents claim that “the type of therapy indicated [in patient applications do] not meet the 14 hour per week criteria.” This, followed up by a letter from Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillier outlining that the CRA believes that advances in technology (read: Insulin Pumps) have decreased the time needed by adults to care for for Type 1 diabetes. Perhaps the biggest insult to the Type 1 community is the fact that the CRA has decided that their evaluation of the care needed for Type 1 diabetes supersedes the recommendations of the medical community. Each applicant works with a medical professional to document the minutes and hours required for proper care. An application cannot be submitted without a signature from a medical professional (and, in most cases, follow-up communication with that medical professional to confirm th Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit Help

Disability Tax Credit Help

Hi there i am new here and looking for some info on this tax credit.. my doctor called me today asking for some information so he can send out the forum for my disability tax credit and i have till friday to shot him a number on hours per week that are used on injection..glucose monitoring.. all that fun stuff.. also figuring out medication doses for food i am going to eat.. im hoping someone knows the minimum that are required to be eligible for this tax credit so i dont over shoot since i only have 1 day to figure it out... so if somone can tell me the requirements of hours needed spent on this stuff to be eligible can you let me know.. plz and thanks!!! Glucose monitoring: 1 minute per test at up to 10 tests a day (70 minutes/week) Injections: 1 minute per injection at up to 8 injections a day (56 minutes) Calculating doses for food: 30 seconds at up to 5 meals per day (17.5 minutes) Total time those things affect my ability to work: 0 hours/week Last edited by Triv; 9/10/16 at 12:19 PM. Reason: Moderated D.D. Family type 2 since January 27th, 2016 Glucose monitoring: 1 minute per test at up to 10 tests a day (70 minutes/week) Injections: 1 minute per injection at up to 8 injections a day (56 minutes) Calculating doses for food: 30 seconds at up to 5 meals per day (17.5 minutes) Total time those things affect my ability to work: 0 hours/week disabled. I would bet the majority of diabetics are fully capable of working just fine. Some, like my uncle, should have gotten disability. But he didn't get his approval letter in the mail until the day he was taken off of life support. He worked full time plus hours up to the day before he died. So unless you have something more than diabetes, I am not sure why you need disability. Last edited by Triv; 9/10/16 at 12:20 PM. Rea Continue reading >>

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